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AP Top News at 1:33 p.m. EDT

Waffle House suspect remains on the run, may be armed
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - A mentally unstable gunman stole a BMW from a dealership and escaped capture days before killing four people at a Waffle House, police said Monday as their manhunt intensified more than 24 hours the attack. "The crime he committed, a quadruple murder, there's nothing more urgent than that, to find the person responsible," Nashville Police spokesman Don Aaron said. "Given his exhibited mental instability over many months that we're aware of, that's certainly another layer of urgency." The car stolen Tuesday was recovered that day near the apartment of Travis Reinking, but police didn't connect him to the theft until after the restaurant attack, when they found the car keys in his apartment, Nashville Police spokesman Don Aaron said.


'It was life or death,' says man who snatched gunman's AR-15
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The man who snatched an AR-15 rifle from a gunman at a busy Tennessee restaurant says his was a ``selfish'' act of self-preservation and he doesn't consider himself a hero. Never mind that he is being credited with saving several other lives. ``When I grabbed the barrel of the weapon it was hot, but I didn't care. It was life or death,'' said James Shaw Jr., a 29-year-old Nashville resident who found himself wrestling with the suspect after four people had already been fatally shot at a Waffle House bustling with patrons early Sunday in Nashville.


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AP-NORC Poll: Amid strikes, Americans back teacher raises
WASHINGTON (AP) - Americans overwhelmingly believe teachers don't make enough money, and half say they'd support paying higher taxes to give educators a raise. The findings of the new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research come amid recent teacher strikes and other protests over low pay, tough classroom conditions and the amount of money allocated to public schools in several Republican-led states. Tens of thousands of Arizona teachers voted last week to strike after rejecting an offer of a 20-percent raise, because it didn't include a vow from state lawmakers not to further cut taxes before providing more money for the state's schools.


US brands suffer collateral damage in Chinese corporate war
SHANGHAI (AP) - It was looking like a banner year for business in China. The U.S. clothing company was expecting a 20 percent jump in online sales on Alibaba's Tmall, thanks to the e-commerce giant's massive reach. But executives soon learned that what Alibaba gives, it can also take away. The company refused to sign an exclusive contract with Alibaba, and instead participated in a big sale promotion with its archrival, JD.com Inc. Tmall punished them by taking steps to cut traffic to their storefront, two executives told The Associated Press. They said advertising banners vanished from prominent spots in Tmall sales showrooms, the company was blocked from special sales and products stopped appearing in top search results.


Iran police's assault on woman over headscarf stirs debate
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - A grainy video of female officers from Iran's morality police assaulting a young woman whose headscarf only loosely covered her hair has sparked a new public debate on the decades-long requirement for women in the Islamic Republic. While officials of all ranks up to President Hassan Rouhani have weighed in on the incident, it has seen women in Iran not only question the rule that they must wear the hijab in the street but also their faith in the theocratic Shiite-dominated nation. Even before the 1979 Islamic Revolution, the long, flowing black robes for women known as chadors and the headscarves, or hijabs, were both a political and religious symbol in the Shiite-dominated nation.


As trial winds down, DA downplays Cosby travel records
NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) - Prosecutors highlighted gaps in Bill Cosby's travel records on Monday as they sought to downplay their significance to the comedian's defense on sexual assault charges. Cosby's lawyers introduced the records in an attempt to show he couldn't have been at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004, the month his chief accuser alleges he drugged and sexually molested her there. But prosecutors pointed out multiple stretches of time that month when Cosby wasn't aboard his private jet or performing around the country. And District Attorney Kevin Steele noted in court Monday that the records reflect only jet travel, not other modes of transportation.


After brief relief, forecasts indicate drought will continue
Recent showers temporarily relieved drought conditions in parts of the southwestern United States, but dry weather will persist through the summer. Forecasters said Monday a months-long drought is considered "extreme" from southern California to central Kansas. Conditions are even worse in the Four Corners region and the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. The drought has contributed to numerous wildfires. Forecasters say it will last at least through July, with some improvement east of a line from Albuquerque to Denver. The scientists said the desert-like air is responsible for some anomalies. At Alva, Oklahoma, the temperature last Tuesday climbed from 33 degrees to 101 in less than a day.


S.Korea halts propaganda broadcasts before summit with North
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - South Korea halted anti-North Korea propaganda broadcasts across their tense border on Monday as officials from the two Koreas met again to work out details of their leaders' upcoming talks, expected to focus on the North's nuclear program. Seoul had been blasting propaganda messages and K-pop songs from border loudspeakers since the North's fourth nuclear test in early 2016. The North quickly matched the South's action with its own border broadcasts and launches of balloons carrying anti-South Korea leaflets across the border. South Korea turned off its broadcasts on Monday to ease military tensions and establish an environment for peaceful talks, Seoul's Defense Ministry said in a statement.


Pompeo facing rare opposition from Senate panel
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's nominee for secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, is facing serious opposition before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which may not have enough votes to recommend him for confirmation because all Democrats, and at least one Republican, have said they will oppose him. The full Senate is still expected to consider Pompeo's nomination later this week. But the rare rebuke expected from the panel Monday, even after Pompeo's recent visit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, would be the first time in years that a nominee for the high-level Cabinet position did not receive a favorable committee vote.