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Clinton says controversies behind her; Trump begs to differ
NEW YORK (AP) - Hillary Clinton vigorously defended her family's foundation against Donald Trump's criticism on Friday and declared she's confident there will be no major further accusations involving the foundation, her emails or anything else that could undermine her chances of defeating him in November. She said the private Clinton Foundation's charitable programs would continue if she's elected, even as Trump and other critics argue they would present a conflict of interest. In an interview on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," the Democratic presidential nominee kept up her verbal assault on Trump's campaign, asserting it is built on "prejudice and paranoia" and caters to a radical fringe of the Republican Party.


US: Clinton calendars won't be released until after election
WASHINGTON (AP) - Seven months after a federal judge ordered the State Department to begin releasing monthly batches of the detailed daily schedules showing meetings by Hillary Clinton during her time as secretary of state, the government told The Associated Press it won't finish the job before Election Day. The department has so far released about half of the schedules. Its lawyers said in a phone conference with the AP's lawyers that the department now expects to release the last of the detailed schedules around Dec. 30, weeks before the next president is inaugurated. The AP's lawyers late Friday formally asked the State Department to hasten that effort so that the department could provide all Clinton's minute-by-minute schedules by Oct.


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Rebels, civilians leave town after four-year siege
DARAYA, Syria (AP) - Escorted by armed troops, dozens of insurgents and their families left this war-wrecked suburb of the Syrian capital on Friday as part of a forced evacuation deal struck with the government to end a four-year siege and aerial campaign that has left the area in ruins. The capitulation by rebel forces in Daraya, an early bastion of the uprising against President Bashar Assad, provides another boost for his forces amid a stalemate in the fight for Aleppo, Syria's largest city. It also improves security around Assad's seat of power, pacifying an entire region southwest of Damascus that was once a backbone of the rebellion.


Girl's killing is New Mexico's latest horrific child death
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - The killing this week of a 10-year-old Albuquerque girl who was drugged, raped and dismembered is just the latest horrific child slaying case for New Mexico, which has the nation's highest youth poverty rate and a state government that has had heavily publicized difficulties protecting children from abuse. Victoria Martens was not known to have been a victim of previous violent abuse. But officials acknowledged Friday that the man accused of injecting her with methamphetamine before raping her was not being monitored by probation officers or tested for drugs as mandated by a judge last year.


Photograph of separated elderly Canada couple gets attention
VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) - A photograph of a crying elderly Canadian couple in wheelchairs, separated into two different care homes after 62 years of marriage because no beds were available together, has received international attention. Wolfram Gottschalk, 83, of Surrey, British Columbia was put in an assisted living home in January after he suffered dementia health complications making it impossible for wife Anita, 81, to care for him at home. Four months later, Anita entered a different facility despite family efforts to keep them together. The facilities are half an hour apart, with family driving Anita to see Wolfram several times a week.


FDA expands Zika screening to all US blood centers
WASHINGTON (AP) - The government told all U.S. blood banks Friday to start screening for Zika, a major expansion intended to protect the nation's blood supply from the mosquito-borne virus. Previously, blood testing was mostly limited to parts of Florida and Puerto Rico, where Zika is spreading. Screening will initially extend to states along the Gulf Coast and a few others. "There is still much uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of Zika virus transmission," Dr. Peter Marks said in a Food and Drug Administration release. "At this time, the recommendation for testing the entire blood supply will help ensure that safe blood is available for all individuals who might need transfusion." Blood banks already test donations for HIV, hepatitis, West Nile and other blood-borne viruses.


The colonel's secret recipe revealed? Not so fast, says KFC
NEW YORK (AP) - Has Colonel Sanders' nephew inadvertently revealed to the world the secret blend of 11 herbs and spices behind KFC's fried chicken empire? The company says the recipe published in the Chicago Tribune is not authentic. But that hasn't stopped rampant online speculation that one of the most legendary and closely guarded secrets in the history of fast food has been exposed. It all started when a reporter visited with Joe Ledington, a nephew of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Colonel Harland David Sanders. The reporter was working on a story for the Tribune's travel section about Corbin, Kentucky, where the colonel served his first fried chicken.


Lawmakers call Maine governor unhinged after obscene tirade
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) - Maine's bombastic Republican governor has built a reputation on his unfiltered comments, but his obscene tirade unleashed on a liberal lawmaker prompted Democratic lawmakers Friday to warn that the governor was coming unhinged and to call for a political intervention. Gov. Paul LePage apologized to "the people of Maine" - but not to the legislator - after he left a voicemail message for Democratic Rep. Drew Gattine that said "I am after you" and then told reporters he wished he could challenge Gattine to a duel and point a gun "right between his eyes." LePage said the angry outburst was justified because Gattine had called him racist - something Gattine denied.


Oregon fair generates buzz with 1st legal pot display in US
SALEM, Ore. (AP) - Living marijuana plants went on display Friday at the Oregon State Fair, with organizers saying it's the first state fair in the nation to allow cannabis for public viewing. The state voted to legalize recreational marijuana in late 2014. Here are a few things to know about legal pot in Oregon and the display at the fair: --- WHAT'S THE BUZZ? The Oregon State Fair allowed a display about marijuana without any living plants last year and it generated no complaints. So this year, the organization took the next step and agreed to let marijuana growers display live plants.



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