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AP Top News at 7:51 a.m. EDT

Trump revisits his Charlottesville comments in angry speech
PHOENIX (AP) - President Donald Trump opened his political rally in Phoenix with calls for unity and an assertion that "our movement is about love." Then he erupted in anger. He blamed the media for the widespread condemnation of his response to violence at a Charlottesville, Virginia, protest organized by white supremacists. And he shouted that he had "openly called for healing, unity and love" in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy and had simply been misrepresented in news coverage. He read from his three responses to the racially charged violence - getting more animated with each one. He withdrew from his suit pocket the written statement he'd read the day a woman was killed by a man who'd plowed a car through counter-protesters, but he skipped over the trouble-causing part that he'd freelanced at the time - his observation that "many sides" were to blame.


Navy dismisses 7th Fleet commander after warship accidents
TOKYO (AP) - The U.S. Navy dismissed the commander of the Asia-based 7th Fleet on Wednesday after a series of warship accidents raised questions about its operations in the Pacific. A two-sentence statement said Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, had relieved Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin "due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command." The move follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing. "While each of these four incidents is unique, they cannot be viewed in isolation," Swift said earlier. He said the Navy will carry out a "deliberate re-set" of all its ships in the Pacific, focused on navigation, mechanical systems and bridge resource management.


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. WHO TRUMP IS BLAMING FOR CHARLOTTESVILLE RESPONSE During a rally in Phoenix, the president blames the media for the widespread condemnation of his reaction to the deadly protest organized by white supremacists. 2. NAVY 7TH FLEET COMMANDER REMOVED The dismissal of Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing. 3. WHAT TALK CLIMATE CHANGE IS SPURRING IN ARCTIC With ice pushing farther north each year, the remote region's natural resources, shipping routes, fishing and tourism opportunities are increasingly in demand, AP finds.


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Yemen officials: Saudi-led coalition strikes hotel, many die
CAIRO (AP) - The Saudi-led coalition carried out several airstrikes in Yemen early on Wednesday, hitting a small hotel near the capital of Sanaa and killing dozens of Shiite Houthi rebels and civilians, Yemeni officials and witnesses said. According to the officials, an estimated number of 60 were killed in the attack, which took place in the strikes on Wednesday morning in the town of Arhab, about 35 kilometers (22 miles) north of Sanaa. The two-story hotel in the town's Qaa al-Qaidhi neighborhood sustained extensive damage and bodies were still being retrieved from under the rubble, witnesses said. They also said another airstrike hit a checkpoint manned by the Houthis, a few kilometers (miles) from the hotel.


After US cuts, delays aid to Egypt, Kushner snubbed in Cairo
CAIRO (AP) - White House adviser Jared Kushner and visiting U.S. officials were snubbed by the Foreign Ministry in Cairo on Wednesday in apparent protest over the Trump administration's move to cut and delay aid to Egypt. Egypt's top diplomat, Sameh Shoukry, was to meet with the U.S. delegation headed by Kushner, but a modified version of the minister's schedule showed the meeting had been called off, shortly after the Americans landed in Cairo. The protest came after the Trump administration on Tuesday cut nearly $100 million in military and economic aid to Egypt and delayed almost $200 million more in military financing, pending human rights improvements and action to ease harsh restrictions on civic and other non-governmental groups.


Police: DNA of headless torso matches Swedish journalist
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) - A headless torso found on a beach off Copenhagen has been identified as that of missing Swedish journalist Kim Wall, who is believed to have died on an amateur-built submarine earlier this month, Danish police said Wednesday. Wall, 30, was last seen alive on Aug. 10 on Danish inventor Peter Madsen's submarine, which police believe he intentionally sank off Denmark's eastern coast the following day. Madsen, 46, who was then arrested on preliminary manslaughter charges, denies having anything to do with Wall's disappearance. Her family says that the freelance journalist was working on a story about Madsen.


Uncounted Kansas ballots fuel fears about Kobach's proposals
WICHITA, Kansas (AP) - A conservative firebrand promoting President Donald Trump's unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud oversees a Kansas election system that threw out at least three times as many ballots as any similarly sized state did, fueling concerns about massive voter suppression should its practices become the national standard. Only six states - all among the top 10 in population - discarded more votes during the 2016 election than the 33rd-largest state of Kansas, according to data collected by the bipartisan U.S. Election Assistance Commission, a federal agency that certifies voting systems. Kansas' 13,717 rejected ballots even topped the 13,461 from Florida, which has about seven times as many residents.


North Korea photos suggest new solid-fuel missile designs
TOKYO (AP) - North Korea's state media released photos Wednesday that appear to show the designs of one or possibly two new missiles. Concept diagrams of the missiles were seen hanging on a wall behind leader Kim Jong Un while he visited a plant that makes solid-fuel engines for the country's ballistic-missile program. One of the photos clearly showed a diagram for a missile called "Pukguksong-3," which appears to be the latest in its Pukguksong, or Polaris, series. The other was harder to discern, though it carried a "Hwasong," or Mars, designation name. The photos were carried in the morning edition of the Rodong Sinmun, the ruling party's newspaper, and released by the Korean Central News Agency just two days after the United States and South Korea began annual military exercises that the North claims are a rehearsal for war.


Warming Arctic spurs battles for riches, shipping routes
LANCASTER SOUND, Nunavut (AP) - From a distance, the northern shores of Baffin Island in the Arctic appear barren - a craggy world of snow-capped peaks and glaciers surrounded by a sea of floating ice even in the midst of summer. Yet beneath the forbidding surface of the world's fifth largest island lies a vast treasure in the shape of an exceptionally pure strain of iron ore. The Baffinland mine, part-owned by a local company and ArcelorMittal, one of the world's biggest steel producers, is believed to hold enough ore to feed smelters for decades. As climate change pushes the cold and ice a little farther north each year, it is spurring talk of a gold rush for the Arctic's abundant natural resources, prized shipping routes and business opportunities in tourism and fishing.


Lab-made "mini organs" helping doctors treat cystic fibrosis
UTRECHT, Netherlands (AP) - Els van der Heijden, who has cystic fibrosis, was finding it ever harder to breathe as her lungs filled with thick, sticky mucus. Despite taking more than a dozen pills and inhalers a day, the 53-year-old had to stop working and scale back doing the thing she loved best, horseback riding. Doctors saw no sense in trying an expensive new drug because it hasn't been proven to work in people with the rare type of cystic fibrosis that van der Heijden had. Instead, they scraped a few cells from van der Heijden and used them to grow a mini version of her large intestine in a petri dish.