AP Top News at 6:05 a.m. EDT

Damaged USS John S. McCain arrives in Singapore; 10 missing
SINGAPORE (AP) - The USS John S. McCain guided missile destroyer docked Monday at Singapore's naval base with "significant damage" to its hull after an early morning collision with an oil tanker, as vessels from several nations searched for 10 missing U.S. sailors. The collision east of Singapore between the destroyer and the 183-meter (600-foot) Alnic MC, which has recent safety violations, was the second involving a ship from the U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet in the Pacific in two months. Vessels and aircraft from the U.S., Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia are searching for the missing sailors. Four sailors were evacuated by a Singaporean navy helicopter to a hospital in the city-state for treatment of non-life threatening injuries, the Navy said.


Barcelona attack driver still at large, identity confirmed
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) - Spanish authorities confirmed on Monday the identity of the driver of the deadly van attack in Barcelona and said that he is the last member of the 12-man Islamic extremist cell still at large. Catalan interior minister Joaquim Forn told Catalunya Radio that 22-year-old Moroccan suspect Younes Abouyaaqoub is the final target of a manhunt that has been ongoing since Thursday's attack in Barcelona. Forn said that "everything indicates" that Abouyaaqoub was the driver of the van that plowed down Barcelona's emblematic Las Ramblas promenade on Thursday, killing 13 pedestrians and injuring over 120 more. Another attack hours later by other members of the cell killed one person and injured several more in the coastal town of Cambrils.


Trump to outline Afghan strategy in national TV address
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump will use a nationally televised address to outline for a war-weary nation the strategy he believes will best position the U.S. to eventually declare victory in Afghanistan after 16 years of combat and lives lost. The speech Monday night will also give Trump a chance for a reset after one of the most difficult weeks of his short presidency. Trump tweeted Saturday that he had reached a decision on the way forward in Afghanistan, a day after he reviewed war options with his national security team at a meeting at Camp David, Maryland. The president offered no clues about whether he would send thousands more U.S.


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US and S. Korean troops start drills amid N. Korea standoff
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - U.S. and South Korean troops kicked off their annual drills Monday that come after President Donald Trump and North Korea exchanged warlike rhetoric in the wake of the North's two intercontinental ballistic missile tests last month. The Ulchi Freedom Guardian drills are largely computer-simulated war games held every summer and have drawn furious responses from North Korea, which views them as an invasion rehearsal. Pyongyang's state media on Sunday called this year's drills a "reckless" move that could trigger the "uncontrollable phase of a nuclear war." Despite the threat, U.S. and South Korean militaries launched this year's 11-day training on Monday morning as scheduled.


Americans stake out prime viewing spots to see sun go dark
Americans with telescopes, cameras and protective glasses staked out viewing spots along a narrow corridor from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the moon blot out the midday sun Monday in what promised to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history. Eclipse-watchers everywhere - and millions were expected to peer at the sun - fretted about the weather and hoped for clear skies for the first total solar eclipse to sweep coast-to-coast across the U.S. in practically a century. As he set up telescopes, Ray Cooper, a volunteer with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Salem, worried offshore clouds might roll in and spoil the less than two-minute show.


Trump won places drowning in despair. Can he save them?
ABERDEEN, Wash. (AP) - One-hundred-fifty baskets of pink petunias hang from the light posts all over this city, watered regularly by residents trying to make their community feel alive again. A local artist spends his afternoons high in a bucket truck, painting a block-long mural of a little girl blowing bubbles, each circle the scene of an imagined, hopeful future. But in the present, vacant buildings dominate blocks. A van, stuffed so full of blankets and boxes they are spilling from the windows, pulls to the curb outside Stacie Blodgett's antiques shop. "Look inside of it," she says. "I bet you he's living in it." Around the corner, a crowded tent city of the desperate and addicted has taken over the riverbank, makeshift memorials to too many dead too young jutting up intermittently from the mud.


Jerry Lewis, Hollywood survivor, showman, dies at 91
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Jerry Lewis epitomized what it meant to be a survivor in Hollywood. Through ups and downs in popularity, health troubles and weight fluctuations and the sorts of seismic shifts that take place over decades in the entertainment industry, Lewis always figured out a way to battle back, to reinvent himself, to stay relevant. It's what enduring stars know how to do instinctively; perhaps it's that very drive that makes them stars in the first place. Through it all, Lewis remained the consummate showman, and his distinctive comic legacy surely will continue to survive for decades to come.


Legendary comedian Jerry Lewis knew how to laugh and cry
NEW YORK (AP) - Jerry Lewis sometimes didn't know whether to laugh or cry. "There's nothing more dramatic than the comedy I've done," Lewis, who died Sunday at age 91, told The Associated Press in 2016. "Because the comedy I've done is to get to the audience, get them to feel it, or they won't laugh." If jokes are the children of pain, then Lewis was a born patriarch. The filmmaker, entertainer and sleepless host of the Muscular Dystrophy telethons was a storm system of rage and ecstasy, Olympian physical talent, artistic aspiration and vintage Vegas schmaltz. The crazed funnyman who would scream like a toddler worked on a Holocaust film called "The Day the Clown Cried" and for his theme song chose the self-mythology of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "You'll Never Walk Alone": --- Walk on through the wind Walk on through the rain Though your dreams be tossed and blown Walk on, walk on With hope in your heart And you'll never walk alone -- Some comedians are always in character.


Trump's neo-Nazi rally comments thrust GOP doubts into open
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's racially fraught comments about a deadly neo-Nazi rally have thrust into the open some Republicans' deeply held doubts about his competency and temperament, in an extraordinary public airing of worries and grievances about a sitting president by his own party. Behind the high-profile denunciations voiced this week by GOP senators once considered Trump allies, scores of other, influential Republicans began to express grave concerns about the state of the Trump presidency. In interviews with Associated Press reporters across nine states, 25 Republican politicians, party officials, advisers and donors expressed worries about whether Trump has the self-discipline and capability to govern successfully.


Northwestern prof, Oxford worker to stay jailed before trial
CHICAGO (AP) - The fatal stabbing of a hairstylist in Chicago was part of a sexual fantasy hatched in an online chatroom between a Northwestern University professor and an Oxford University employee, whose plan included killing someone and then themselves, prosecutors told a Cook County judge Sunday at a bond hearing for the men. An Illinois prosecutor shared disturbing new details about the July 27 slaying, describing to the court how Trenton James Cornell-Duranleau, the 26-year-old boyfriend of since-fired microbiology professor Wyndham Lathem, was stabbed 70 times at Lathem's Chicago condo and with such brutality that he was nearly decapitated. His throat was slit and pulmonary artery torn.