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GOP says it's got a deal on taxes; cuts coming for next year
WASHINGTON (AP) - Confident congressional Republicans forged an agreement Wednesday on a major overhaul of the nation's tax laws that would provide generous tax cuts for corporations and the wealthiest Americans - Donald Trump among them - and deliver the first major legislative accomplishment to the GOP president. Middle- and low-income families would get smaller tax cuts, though Trump and GOP leaders have billed the package as a huge benefit for the middle class. The measure would scrap a major tax requirement of Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, a step toward the ultimate GOP goal of unraveling the law. "The cynical voices that opposed tax cuts grow smaller and weaker, and the American people grow stronger," Trump said at the White House.


Ky. lawmaker accused of assault dies in apparent suicide
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) - Dan Johnson, a Republican state lawmaker in Kentucky who defiantly denied allegations that he sexually assaulted a teenage girl in the basement of his home, died in an apparent suicide Wednesday night, the county coroner said. He was 57. Bullitt County Coroner Dave Billings said Johnson died of a single gunshot wound on Greenwell Ford Road in Mount Washington, Kentucky. Billings said Johnson stopped his car at the end of a bridge in a secluded area, then got out and walked to the front of the car. He said an autopsy is scheduled for Thursday morning.


10 Things to Know for Thursday
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Thursday: 1. HOUSE, SENATE LEADERS REACH DEAL ON TAXES The broad parameters of the agreement call for cutting the top tax rate for the wealthy and slashing the corporate rate. 2. HOW GOP IS HANDLING BIG ALABAMA LOSS While the president has been humbled, some establishment-minded Republicans are cheered that Roy Moore's loss lifts an albatross on GOP candidates in next year's campaigns. 3. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT DEFENDS MUELLER Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, appearing before the House Judiciary Committee, says he has seen no cause to fire the special counsel and hasn't been pressured to.


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UN chief: Iran may be defying UN on missiles, OK on nukes
UNITED NATIONS (AP) - Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is warning that Iran may be defying a U.N. call to halt ballistic missile development even as it complies with the nuclear deal with six world powers. The U.N. chief says in a report to the Security Council that the United Nations is investigating Iran's possible transfer of ballistic missiles to Houthi Shiite rebels in Yemen that may have been used in launches aimed at Saudi Arabia on July 22 and Nov. 4. The report on implementation of a U.N. resolution that endorsed the July 2015 nuclear agreement was obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press.


GOP's not all that sad; party grapples with Alabama fallout
WASHINGTON (AP) - Weary national Republicans breathed a collective sigh of relief on Wednesday, a day after voters knocked out their own party's scandal-plagued candidate in deep-red Alabama. Yet all is not well in a party confronted with new rounds of infighting and a suddenly shrinking Senate majority heading into next year's midterm elections. A semi-humbled President Donald Trump conceded that Roy Moore's loss was not his preferred outcome. He said he "would have liked to have had the seat" and an important Senate vote as he and GOP lawmakers scratch for legislative victories. But he also acknowledged, "A lot of Republicans feel differently.


Former 'Apprentice' contestant Omarosa leaving White House
WASHINGTON (AP) - True to form, former "Apprentice" star Omarosa is ending her time at the White House with a dose of drama. Omarosa Manigault Newman, one of President Donald Trump's most prominent African-American supporters, was escorted off the White House grounds after resigning her post as a presidential adviser, according to two White House officials who spoke on condition of anonymity. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Wednesday that Manigault Newman's resignation is effective Jan. 20, one year after Trump's inauguration. "We wish her the best in future endeavors and are grateful for her service," Sanders said. The president also bid her farewell, tweeting: "Thank you Omarosa for your service!


Hayek says rebuffing Weinstein led to nightmare on 'Frida'
NEW YORK (AP) - In one of the most vivid accounts yet of Harvey Weinstein's alleged abuse and harassment, Salma Hayek says the disgraced movie mogul turned the making of her 2002 passion project, the Frida Kahlo biopic "Frida," into a nightmare after the actress refused Weinstein's relentless advances. "For years, he was my monster," Hayek wrote in an op-ed published Wednesday by The New York Times. Her refusals - of massages, showers and sex - enraged him, she wrote. "I don't think he hated anything more than the word 'no,'" wrote Hayek. Hayek, who regularly starred in films released by Weinstein's Miramax in the 1990s, credited Weinstein with helping her start her career.


Report: 3 women accuse music mogul Russell Simmons of rape
NEW YORK (AP) - Three women have told the New York Times that music mogul Russell Simmons raped them, the latest in a cascade of serious allegations of sexual misconduct against powerful men in entertainment, media, politics and elsewhere. Simmons vehemently denied what he called "these horrific accusations," saying in a statement emailed to The Associated Press that "all of my relations have been consensual." The allegations reported by the Times Wednesday stem from the 1980s and 1990s. One woman, Drew Dixon, said Simmons assaulted her in his downtown apartment in 1995, when she was an executive at Def Jam Recordings, reporting to Simmons.


The Latest: Trump Jr. finishes 9-hour interview in Senate
Donald Trump Jr. has finished a nine-hour interview with the Senate intelligence committee, concluding his third interview on Capitol Hill as part of probes into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Trump Jr.'s closed-door meeting with Senate staff came a week after he spoke to lawmakers on the House intelligence committee. The Senate Judiciary Committee interviewed him in September. All three panels are investigating the meddling and whether President Donald Trump's campaign was involved. Investigators have been looking into a June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer that Trump Jr. and other campaign officials attended. The top Democrat on the Senate intelligence panel, Virginia Sen.


Bombing underscores New York subway system's vulnerability
NEW YORK (AP) - The crude pipe bomb that exploded beneath the streets of New York this week served as a chilling reminder of the vulnerability of the city's subway system, a 24-hour-a-day operation with 472 stations and more than 5 million daily riders. While police say the nation's largest subway system has some of the tightest security possible that still allows busy New Yorkers to get where they're going, they acknowledge they can't be everywhere or anticipate every kind of attack, particularly in this era of lone-wolf terrorism. "It's very difficult, and it's getting harder," John Miller, the New York Police Department's deputy commissioner of intelligence and counterterrorism, said on CBS's "This Morning." ''This is not the al-Qaida model, where a cell of people who are communicating with a base are an intelligence problem." Instead, he said, the threat is coming from people "where the conspiracy is within the confines of their own mind." Investigators say that appears to be what happened Monday, when a Bangladeshi immigrant indoctrinated into terrorism through internet videos strapped a bomb to his body and set it off in a busy passageway.

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