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AP Top News at 2:06 p.m. EDT

House intel chairman met source on White House grounds
WASHINGTON (AP) - House intelligence chairman Devin Nunes met on the White House grounds with the source of the claim that communications involving President Donald Trump's associates were caught up in "incidental" surveillance, the congressman's spokesman said Monday. The meeting occurred before Nunes disclosed at a news conference that U.S. spy agencies may have inadvertently captured Trump and his associates in routine targeting of foreigners' communications. "Chairman Nunes met with his source at the White House grounds in order to have proximity to a secure location where he could view the information provided by the source," Nunes spokesman Jack Langer said.


Bitter GOP finger-pointing clouds path for Trump agenda
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump is hoping to drive his priorities forward following the crumbling of the Republican health care bill but GOP finger-pointing is rampant, underscoring how tough it will be to produce the unity the party will need. Rep. Ted Poe, R-Texas, criticized the contrarian House Freedom Caucus on Monday, a day after resigning from the hard-right group because it helped sink the Republican health care effort. "You can have your principles and then when it comes to voting, you have to compromise to get something passed," Poe said of the caucus, which has roughly three dozen members.


AP Exclusive: Price tag of North Carolina's LGBT law: $3.76B
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - Despite Republican assurances that North Carolina's "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy, the law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years, according to an Associated Press analysis. Over the past year, North Carolina has suffered financial hits ranging from scuttled plans for a PayPal facility that would have added an estimated $2.66 billion to the state's economy to a canceled Ringo Starr concert that deprived a town's amphitheater of about $33,000 in revenue. The blows have landed in the state's biggest cities as well as towns surrounding its flagship university, and from the mountains to the coast.


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Stocks pare their losses as health care companies climb
NEW YORK (AP) - After falling sharply in the morning, U.S. stock indexes clawed back and were down only modestly in afternoon trading. A run higher for hospital stocks helped to stem losses for banks and other financial stocks. The dollar also pared its losses against other currencies. KEEPING SCORE: The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 3 points, or 0.1 percent, at 2,341 as of 2 p.m. Eastern time. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 41 points, or 0.2 percent, to 20,555. The Nasdaq composite rose 10 points, or 0.2 percent, to 5,839. AFTERNOON COMEBACK: Indexes had been down much more sharply early Monday on worries that the Trump White House may not be able to help businesses as much as once thought.


Suspects sought in deadly Cincinnati nightclub shooting
CINCINNATI (AP) - Cincinnati police searched for suspects in a nightclub shooting that left one man dead and 16 other people injured and sent club patrons diving to the ground to dodge bullets in what they described as a chaotic and terrifying scene. A gunfight broke out inside the crowded Cameo club early Sunday after a dispute among several patrons escalated into a shootout, authorities said. Some 200 people were inside the club near the Ohio River, east of downtown Cincinnati at the time. "What we know at this point in the investigation is that several local men got into some type of dispute inside the bar, and it escalated into shots being fired from several individuals," Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac said.


Navalny: a savvy and determined Kremlin foe
MOSCOW (AP) - The 15-day jail sentence imposed Monday on Alexei Navalny is nothing new for the Kremlin's most visible domestic foe, and is unlikely to be more than a brief interruption of his campaign against what he calls "the party of crooks and thieves." He's repeatedly been jailed, endured a year of house arrest and three convictions that could have brought him significant prison time. Amid all the detentions, the 40-year-old Navalny has relentlessly pursued corruption investigations that allege the top tier of Russian officials, including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, have amassed extraordinary wealth, living lives of unparalleled luxury behind their modest public images.


Police: 'No evidence' London attacker associated with IS
LONDON (AP) - Police have found no evidence that the man who killed four people in London last week was associated with the Islamic State group or al-Qaida, a senior British counterterrorism officer said Monday. Deputy Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu of the Metropolitan Police said Westminster attacker Khalid Masood clearly had "an interest in jihad," but police have no indication he discussed his attack plans with others. Basu, who also serves as Britain's senior national coordinator for counterterrorism policing, said Wednesday's attack - in which Masood ran down pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge before fatally stabbing a policeman guarding Parliament - "appears to be based on low-sophistication, low-tech, low-cost techniques copied from other attacks." Masood was shot dead by police after his deadly rampage, which police have revealed lasted just 82 seconds.


On Muslims' agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states
Muslims complain they are frivolous bills meant to spread fears and sow suspicion of their religion in a nation divided. But supporters of state proposals to prevent Islamic code from being used in American courts argue they aren't overtly anti-Muslim and are needed to safeguard constitutional rights for average Americans. The bills, variations of which have been around for years, don't specifically seek to ban Islamic law, known as Sharia, even though some lawmakers concede that's their intent. Instead, the proposals broadly call for banning the application of any foreign law, legal code or legal system that doesn't grant the same rights and privileges as the state or U.S.


NYC Mayor: 'Fearless Girl' statue can stay through Feb. 2018
NEW YORK (AP) - Mayor Bill de Blasio has decided that the globally popular statue of a young girl staring down Wall Street's famous "Charging Bull" will remain in place through February 2018. The mayor planned to make an appearance with "Fearless Girl" on Monday afternoon. The 4-foot ponytailed girl in a windblown dress stands on Department of Transportation property and will now get the extended new permit through the department's art program. On Monday morning, U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney led a news conference in front of City Hall to honor the artist, Kristen Visbal, and State Street Global Advisors, the asset management firm that commissioned the work.


Q&A: Who'd gain from a Trump border wall? Hint: Not Mexico
LOS ANGELES (AP) - As a billionaire developer, Donald Trump built casinos, luxe condo towers and lush golf courses. Now, as president, Trump aims to develop perhaps his most ambitious and surely his most contentious project yet: A wall along the nearly 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border. How? At what cost? And who would benefit? Much remains unknown. Ultimately, though, experts say the project, if built, could deliver a windfall for some large construction companies and their suppliers. Engineering and infrastructure companies that have worked on previous government projects could capture a chunk of the multibillion-dollar work. Among them are Kiewit and Flour Enterprises.

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