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AP Top News at 2:26 a.m. EDT

Kim Jong Un says Koreas on "starting line" of a new history
GOYANG, South Korea (AP) - With a single step over a weathered, cracked slab of concrete, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un made history Friday by crossing over the world's most heavily armed border to greet South Korean President Moon Jae-in for talks on North Korea's nuclear weapons. Kim then invited Moon to cross briefly back into the north with him before they returned to the southern side. Those small steps must be seen in the context of the last year - when the United States, its ally South Korea and the North seemed at times to be on the verge of nuclear war as the North unleashed a torrent of weapons tests - but also in light of the long, destructive history of the rival Koreas, who fought one of the 20th century's bloodiest conflicts and even today occupy a divided peninsula that's still technically in a state of war.


The Latest: Kim's wife to cross border for dinner with South
Seoul says North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's wife will cross the border into South Korea to attend a dinner banquet after the Koreas' summit talks at a border village. Kim crossed the border into South Korea on Friday morning for talks with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the southern side of Panmunjom. Kim was accompanied by a group of top officials but his wife, Ri Sol Ju, was not present. Moon's spokesman Yoon Young-chan says that Ri will cross the border and attend the banquet with Kim, Moon and Moon's wife Kim Jung-sook later Friday. Ri is a former singer with the North's Unhasu Orchestra.


Korean summit starts with a handshake, after year of tension
GOYANG, South Korea (AP) - After a year of tensions, the first North-South Korea summit in more than a decade began Friday with a handshake. Surrounded by bodyguards and other members of his delegation, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un emerged right on cue from a large building on the northern side of the border in the truce village of Panmunjom, walked down a wide flight of stairs and strolled confidently toward South Korean President Moon Jae-in to begin the historic meeting. Smiling broadly and exchanging greetings, the two shook hands for a long time, exchanging greetings and looking from outward appearances like old friends.


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Cosby could spend rest of life in prison for sex assault
NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) - After decades of whispers, lawsuits, investigations and close calls, Bill Cosby could be headed to prison at age 80 for sexual assault for the rest of his life, vindicating a multitude of women who doubted anyone would ever believe their word against that of America's Dad. The comedian was convicted Thursday of drugging and molesting Temple University employee Andrea Constand at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004. Women's advocates called the verdict a turning point in the (hash)MeToo movement that proved what Cosby's accusers had been saying all along: his nice-guy image was a sham.


Use of DNA in serial killer probe sparks privacy concerns
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Investigators who used a genealogical website to find the ex-policeman they believe is a shadowy serial killer and rapist who terrified California decades ago call the technique ground-breaking. But others say it raises troubling legal and privacy concerns for the millions of people who submit their DNA to such sites to discover their heritage. There aren't strong privacy laws to keep police from trolling ancestry site databases, said Steve Mercer, the chief attorney for the forensic division of the Maryland Office of the Public Defender. "People who submit DNA for ancestors testing are unwittingly becoming genetic informants on their innocent family," Mercer said, adding that they "have fewer privacy protections than convicted offenders whose DNA is contained in regulated databanks." Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, was arrested Tuesday after investigators matched crime-scene DNA with genetic material stored by a distant relative on an online site.


Arizona, Colorado teachers rally, schools close for 2nd day
PHOENIX (AP) - Arizona and Colorado teachers plan to don red shirts and descend upon their respective Capitols for a second day in a growing educator uprising. Educators in both states want more classroom resources and have received offers either for increased school funding or pay, but they say the money isn't guaranteed and the efforts don't go far enough. The walkouts are the latest in demonstrations that spread from West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky. On the first day of the historic statewide walkout, around 50,000 educators and their supporters marched Thursday through downtown Phoenix in nearly 100-degree (38-Celsius) heat and swarmed the Capitol grounds.


Tom Brokaw denies sexual misconduct claim by ex-NBC reporter
NEW YORK (AP) - A woman who worked as a war correspondent for NBC News said Tom Brokaw groped her, twice tried to forcibly kiss her and made inappropriate overtures attempting to have an affair, according to two reports published Thursday. Linda Vester told Variety and the Washington Post that the misbehavior from the longtime news anchor at the network took place in NBC offices in Denver and New York in the 1990s, when she was in her 20s. Variety reports that Vester, now 52, showed them journals from the time that corroborated the story. Brokaw, who is 78 and has been married since 1962, denied doing anything inappropriate.


APNewsBreak: Trump lawyer gave loans to pot-linked cab mogul
NEW YORK (AP) - President Donald Trump's personal attorney, whose business dealings are being investigated by the FBI, and his father-in-law have lent $26 million in recent years to a taxi mogul who is shifting into the legalized marijuana industry, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. Semyon "Sam" Shtayner, a longtime business associate of Michael Cohen's father-in-law, created Nevada-based Cannaboss LLC the day before the 2016 election. A few months later, he took a majority position in a company that is provisionally licensed to cultivate medicinal marijuana and produce edibles, the records show. "He personally manages over 500 taxi medallions, but he is looking to transition from the medallion business to the cannibas (sic)," according to the personal narrative Shtayner submitted last October to city officials in Henderson, Nevada, that was obtained by the AP under the state's public records law.


Trump's Cohen comments raise questions about relationship
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump said Thursday that personal attorney Michael Cohen handles very little of his legal work, but did represent him in the "crazy Stormy Daniels deal," a rare presidential public reference to the porn star who claims she had sex with the president in 2006. Prosecutors in New York quickly claimed Trump's early-morning comments buttress their arguments that not much of the material that the FBI seized from Cohen's home, office and hotel should be protected by attorney-client privilege. Within two hours of Trump's interview, the prosecutors submitted papers in court citing Trump's comments. Trump's remarks prompted fresh questions about his relationship with Cohen in the tangle of legal dealings involving the president, his legal fixer and the porn star.


Migrant 'caravan' gathers on US-Mexico border for final push
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) - About 170 migrants in a caravan of Central American asylum-seekers have arrived in Tijuana, joining about nearly 200 others on their final stop before entering the United States. Three tourist buses were guarded by a Mexican police escort on a curvy, mountainous road from the Mexican border city of Mexicali. Lawyers planned free workshops on the U.S. immigration system on Friday and Saturday in Tijuana. Many planned to seek asylum starting Sunday at San Diego's San Ysidro border crossing, the nation's busiest. Migrant shelters in Tijuana's Zona Norte neighborhood, home to the many of the city's seedy bars and bordellos, were full.