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Shimon Peres witnessed Israel's history, and shaped it
JERUSALEM (AP) - At every corner of Israel's tumultuous history, Shimon Peres was there. He was a young aide to the nation's founding fathers when the country declared independence in 1948, and he played a key role in turning Israel into a military power. He was part of the negotiations that sealed the first Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, garnering a Nobel Peace Prize. He was welcomed like royalty in world capitals. But only at the end of a political career stretching more than 60 years did Peres finally win the widespread admiration of his own people that had eluded him for so long.


World leaders mourn Peres, praise him as a man of peace
WASHINGTON (AP) - Current and former world leaders mourned the passing of Shimon Peres early Wednesday, praising him as a patriot, visionary statesman and man of principle who was deeply committed to pursuing peace in a region that has mostly eluded it. President Barack Obama called Peres "the essence of Israel itself," noting he had fought for Israel's independence, worked its land and served Israel in virtually every government position, including three stints as prime minister. Peres, who died early Wednesday at the age of 93, was awarded the 1994 Nobel Prize after he secretly brokered the historic Oslo interim peace accords with the Palestinians a year earlier.


The Latest: Vatican says pope will not attend Peres funeral
The Vatican says that Pope Francis will not be attending the funeral of former Israeli President Shimon Peres, despite earlier reports that he would be coming. Vatican spokesman Greg Burke says the pope will not be able to attend Friday's funeral in Jerusalem, noting that he is scheduled to begin a three-day trip to Georgia and Azerbaijan that day. Israel's Foreign Ministry, after earlier saying the pope would be in attendance, said Wednesday that he was no longer scheduled to attend. It gave no further details.


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Trump has turned over tax returns _ for lawsuits and loans
WASHINGTON (AP) - While Donald Trump won't publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs - if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him. Pennsylvania gaming regulators were given at least five years' worth and eight boxes full of Trump's tax documents. Nevada, Michigan, Missouri, Indiana and other state gaming officials also had access to multiple years of his returns. Large banks that lent Trump money over the years have also obtained Trump's returns. One common thread ties all those who have seen the documents: They can't talk about them.


Police shoot, kill man in San Diego area; protesters gather
EL CAJON, Calif. (AP) - A black man reportedly acting erratically at a strip mall in suburban San Diego was shot and killed by police after pulling an object from his pocket, pointing it at officers and assuming a "shooting stance," authorities said. One of the officers tried and failed to subdue the unidentified man with a stun gun before the other officer fired several times, El Cajon Police Chief Jeff Davis said at a late night news conference. Davis would not say what the object was, but acknowledged it was not a weapon. Before police announced the death, dozens of protesters gathered at the shooting scene, with some claiming the man was shot with his hands raised.


AP: Across US, police officers abuse confidential databases
DENVER (AP) - Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found. Criminal-history and driver databases give officers critical information about people they encounter on the job. But the AP's review shows how those systems also can be exploited by officers who, motivated by romantic quarrels, personal conflicts or voyeuristic curiosity, sidestep policies and sometimes the law by snooping. In the most egregious cases, officers have used information to stalk or harass, or have tampered with or sold records they obtained.


9 states to vote soon on expanding legal access to marijuana
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - From California, with its counterculture heritage, to the fishing ports and mill towns of Maine, millions of Americans in nine states have a chance to vote Nov. 8 on expanding legal access to marijuana. Collectively, the ballot measures amount to the closest the U.S. has come to a national referendum on the drug. Five states - Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada - will consider legalizing the recreational use of pot. Three others - Florida, Arkansas and North Dakota - will decide whether to permit marijuana for medical purposes. Montana will weigh whether to ease restrictions on an existing medical marijuana law.


Disabled man gets license, shows driverless tech's potential
DETROIT (AP) - Former Indy Racing League driver Sam Schmidt has done a lot in the 16 years since an accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. He runs a racing team and a foundation. He's raced a sailboat using his chin. But the man who raced in the Indianapolis 500 hasn't been able to drive around his neighborhood - until now. On Wednesday, Schmidt is set to receive the first license restricted to an autonomous vehicle in the U.S. The license allows him to drive on Nevada roads in his specially modified Corvette, which requires no hands on its steering wheel or feet on its pedals.


SpaceX chief envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying to Mars
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - On a personal quest to settle Mars, SpaceX founder Elon Musk envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying en masse to the red planet well within the next century, "Battlestar Galactica" style. Musk outlined his zealous plan Tuesday to establish a self-sustaining city on Mars, complete with iron foundries and even pizzerias. He wants to make humans a multiplanetary species, and says the best way to do that is to colonize the red planet. "I think Earth will be a good place for a long time, but the probable lifespan of human civilization will be much greater if we're a multiplanetary species," he said.


Williams writes she 'won't be silent' about police killings
Star tennis player Serena Williams says she "won't be silent" about the killing of black men by police officers. Williams wrote on Facebook on Tuesday that she was inspired to speak out after asking her black 18-year-old nephew to drive her to a meeting. Their car traveled past a police officer, and Williams "quickly checked to see if he was obliging by the speed limit" so as to avoid an interaction with the officer. Williams recalled "that horrible video of the woman in the car when a cop shot her boyfriend" - a reference to when Philando Castile was shot by a Minnesota police officer in July - and said she worried about similar fates for members of her family.