AP Top News at 10:25 p.m. EST

Big surge for military in Trump budget, big cuts elsewhere
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump is proposing a huge $54 billion surge in U.S. military spending for new aircraft, ships and fighters in his first federal budget while slashing big chunks from domestic programs and foreign aid to make the government "do more with less." The Trump blueprint, due in more detail next month, would fulfill the Republican president's campaign pledge to boost Pentagon spending while targeting the budgets of other federal agencies. The "topline" figures emerged Monday, one day before Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress, an opportunity to re-emphasize the economic issues that were a centerpiece of his White House run.


Trump looks to refocus his presidency in address to Congress
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's first address to Congress gives him a welcome opportunity to refocus his young administration on the core economic issues that helped him get elected - and, his allies hope, to move beyond the distractions and self-inflicted wounds that have roiled his White House. Trump's advisers say he will use his prime-time speech Tuesday to declare early progress on his campaign promises, including withdrawing the U.S. from a sweeping Pacific Rim trade pact, and to map a path ahead on thorny legislative priorities, including health care and infrastructure spending. "We spend billions in the Middle East, but we have potholes all over the country," Trump said Monday as he previewed the address during a meeting with the nation's governors.


10 Things to Know for Tuesday
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday. 1. TRUMP GETS CHANCE TO REFOCUS GOALS IN SPEECH TO CONGRESS Trump's advisers say he will use his prime-time speech Tuesday to declare progress on his campaign promises, including plans for a Mexico border wall and repealing Obamacare. 2. HOW MUCH MORE TRUMP WANTS TO SPEND ON DEFENSE The president will propose a $54 billion increase in military spending - a 10-percent spike - while cutting domestic programs and foreign aid. 3. 'NOBODY KNEW THAT HEALTH CARE COULD BE SO COMPLICATED' That's what President Trump has to say as Republicans remain at odds over dismantling The Affordable Care Act.


Watch Top News Video




Advocacy groups: Forget Oscars snafu, focus on 'Moonlight'
Yes, the Great Mistake of Oscars 2017 made history in all the wrong kinds of ways. But a day later, advocacy groups and others overjoyed by the Cinderella win of "Moonlight" were saying, let's forget the snafu and move on - because "Moonlight" made history in all the right kinds of ways. The coming-of-age story of a gay black youth in a poor Miami neighborhood was made on the tiniest of budgets - $1.5 million, said director Barry Jenkins backstage. It had a mostly black cast, and was seen as the first LGBT-themed movie to win best picture in the 89-year history of the awards show.


House probe into Russia ties to Trump off to rocky start
WASHINGTON (AP) - A simmering dispute between leaders of the House intelligence committee spilled into the public Monday over an investigation into whether President Donald Trump has ties to Russia, even as they pledged to conduct a bipartisan probe. The Republican committee chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes of California, said he has heard no evidence so far that anyone in Trump's orbit was in contact with Russians during the presidential campaign. The top Democrat on the committee, Adam Schiff, also of California, said the committee's investigation was hardly off the ground and it was premature to make any conclusions. The nature of ties between Trump's associates and Russia has dogged him throughout his nascent presidency, and Monday brought renewed calls for a special prosecutor to investigate the unusual situation.


Firm says several mistakes caused Oscars best picture gaffe
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The accounting firm responsible for the integrity of the Academy Awards said Monday that its staffers did not move quickly enough to correct the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner. PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, wrote in a statement that several mistakes were made and two of its partners assigned to the prestigious awards show did not act quickly enough when "La La Land" was mistakenly announced as the best picture winner. Three of the film's producers spoke before the actual winner, the coming-of-age drama "Moonlight," was announced. "PwC takes full responsibility for the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols during last night's Oscars," PwC wrote.


911 call: Bar shooting suspect said he'd killed 'Iranians'
OLATHE, Kan. (AP) - A bartender at the restaurant where a man was arrested last week for an apparently racially motivated bar shooting of two Indian men told a 911 dispatcher that the suspect admitted shooting two people, but described them as Iranian. A recording from Henry County, Missouri, 911 reveals that the bartender warned police not to approach the building with sirens blaring or the man would "freak out" and "something bad's going to happen." The man, Adam Purinton, 51, of Olathe, made his first appearance in court Monday via video link. He has been charged with first-degree murder and first-degree attempted murder.


Feds rescind opposition to key part of Texas voter ID law
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - The U.S. Justice Department said Monday it is abandoning its longstanding opposition to a key aspect of Texas' toughest-in-the-nation voter ID law, costing voting rights groups their most important ally and possibly encouraging other conservative states to toughen their own election rules with President Donald Trump in charge. It's a dramatic break from the agency's position under President Barack Obama, which spent years arguing that the voter ID law passed in 2011 by Texas' Republican-controlled Legislature was intended to disenfranchise poor and minority voters. "It's a complete 180," said Danielle Lang of the Washington-based Campaign Legal Center.


Takata pleads guilty in air bag scandal, agrees to pay $1B
DETROIT (AP) - Japanese auto parts maker Takata Corp. pleaded guilty to fraud Monday and agreed to pay $1 billion in penalties for concealing an air bag defect blamed for at least 16 deaths, most of them in the U.S. The scandal, meanwhile, seemed to grow wider when plaintiffs' attorneys charged that five major automakers knew the devices were dangerous but continued to use them for years to save money. In pleading guilty, Takata admitted hiding evidence that millions of its air bag inflators can explode with too much force, hurling lethal shrapnel into drivers and passengers. Chief financial officer Yoichiro Nomura spoke on behalf of the Tokyo-based company, saying the conduct was "completely unacceptable." The inflators are blamed for 11 deaths in the U.S.


Pressure on GOP to revamp health law grows, along with rifts
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump declared Monday that "Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated." Yet the opposite has long been painfully obvious for top congressional Republicans, who face mounting pressure to scrap the law even as problems grow longer and knottier. With the GOP-controlled Congress starting its third month of work on one of its marquee priorities, unresolved difficulties include how their substitute would handle Medicaid, whether millions of voters might lose coverage, how their proposed tax credits would work and how to pay for the costly exercise. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office made things complicated recently by giving House Republicans an informal analysis that their emerging plan would be more expensive than they hoped and cover fewer people than former President Barack Obama's statute.

News headlines

Sports headlines

Business headlines