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The Latest: Suspect's family heartbroken, saddened by attack
The family of a man accused of setting off a pipe bomb in a crowded New York City subway corridor says it's heartbroken and deeply saddened by the suffering the attack has caused. In a statement, Akayed Ullah's family also says it's outraged by the way it was targeted by law enforcement, including pulling a teenage relative from class and questioning him without a parent, guardian or attorney present. The family says it expects more from the justice system. The statement was released on behalf of the family by Albert Fox Cahn, legal director for the Council on American-Islamic Relations in New York.


'One of my nightmares': Pipe bomb attack hits in NYC subway
NEW YORK (AP) - A would-be suicide bomber inspired by Islamic State extremists strapped on a crude pipe bomb, slipped unnoticed into the nation's busiest subway system and set the device off at rush hour Monday in a scenario that New York has dreaded for years, authorities said. In the end, the only serious wounds were to the suspect identified as Akayed Ullah, a 27-year-old Bangladeshi immigrant and former cab driver. But the attack sent terrified commuters fleeing through a smoky passageway, and three people suffered headaches and ringing ears from the first bomb blast in the subway in more than two decades.


#MeToo spotlight increasingly pointed at past Trump conduct
NEW YORK (AP) - Donald Trump sailed past a raft of allegations of sexual misconduct in last year's presidential election. Now the national #MeToo spotlight is turning back to Trump and his past conduct. Several of his accusers are urging Congress to investigate his behavior, and a number of Democratic lawmakers are demanding his resignation. With each day seeming to bring new headlines that force men from positions of power, the movement to expose sexual harassment has forced an unwelcome conversation on the White House. In a heated exchange with reporters in the White House briefing room on Monday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders steadfastly dismissed accusations against the Republican president and suggested the issue had already been litigated in Trump's favor on Election Day.


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Alabama foes get in final licks before Tuesday's big vote
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) - Facing voters at last after the year's most bitter U.S. campaign, Alabama Republican Roy Moore cast himself Monday as the victim of a national barrage of unjust allegations of sexual misconduct with teenagers. Rival Doug Jones, hoping to become the state's first Democratic senator in two decades, declared their race was Alabama's referendum on "who we are and what we're going to tell our daughters." Allegations aside, President Donald Trump said in a robocall to Alabama voters that he badly needs Moore's own vote in the U.S. Senate. Former President Barack Obama and his vice president, Joe Biden, recorded calls for Jones seeking to break the GOP's lock on statewide office in Alabama.


Some glitches seen in deadline week for 'Obamacare' sign-ups
WASHINGTON (AP) - Consumer advocates reported some glitches Monday in the final days for "Obamacare" sign-ups, although the Trump administration largely seemed to be keeping its promise of a smooth enrollment experience. In Illinois, some consumers who successfully completed an application for financial assistance through HealthCare.gov got a message saying they would likely be eligible to buy a health plan, "but none are available to you in your area." That information was incorrect because every county in the nation currently has at least one health insurer offering plans under the Affordable Care Act for next year. Friday is the last day to enroll for subsidized private coverage in 39 states served by the federal HealthCare.gov website.


21 Rohingya women recount rape by Myanmar armed forces
UKHIA, Bangladesh (AP) - The use of rape by Myanmar's armed forces has been sweeping and methodical, The Associated Press found in interviews with Rohingya Muslim women and girls now in Bangladesh. They were interviewed separately, come from a variety of villages in Myanmar and now live spread across several refugee camps in Bangladesh. Yet their stories were hauntingly similar. The military has denied its soldiers raped any Rohingya women. Here are the accounts as told by 21 women and girls. They agreed to be identified in this story by their first initial only, out of fear the military will kill them or their families.


AP: Rohingya methodically raped by Myanmar's armed forces
UKHIA, Bangladesh (AP) - The soldiers arrived, as they often did, long after sunset. It was June, and the newlyweds were asleep in their home, surrounded by the fields of wheat they farmed in western Myanmar. Without warning, seven soldiers burst into the house and charged into their bedroom. The woman, a Rohingya Muslim who agreed to be identified by her first initial, F, knew enough to be terrified. She knew the military had been attacking Rohingya villages, as part of what the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing in the mostly Buddhist nation. She heard just days before that soldiers had killed her parents, and that her brother was missing.


Pentagon to allow transgender people to enlist in military
WASHINGTON (AP) - Transgender recruits will be allowed to enlist in the military beginning Jan. 1, the Pentagon said Monday, as President Donald Trump's ordered ban suffered another legal setback. The new policy reflects the difficult hurdles the federal government would have to cross to enforce Trump's demand earlier this year to bar transgender individuals from the military. Two federal courts already have ruled against the ban and on Monday a federal court judge denied a government request to set aside the January start date for enlistment. In October, U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly barred the Trump administration from proceeding with its plan to exclude transgender people from military service.


France names winners of anti-Trump climate change grants
PARIS (AP) - Eighteen climate scientists from the U.S. and elsewhere hit the jackpot Monday as French President Emmanuel Macron awarded them millions of euros in grants to relocate to France for the rest of Donald Trump's presidential term. The "Make Our Planet Great Again" grants - a nod to Trump's "Make America Great Again" campaign slogan - are part of Macron's efforts to counter Trump on the climate change front. Macron announced a contest for the projects in June, hours after Trump declared he would withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord. More than 5,000 people from about 100 countries expressed interest in the grants.


Charges: Turkish businessman exported US goods to Iran
MILWAUKEE (AP) - Federal prosecutors allege a Turkish businessman helped illegally route Wisconsin-made outboard engines and boat generators to the Iranian navy. Forty-year-old Resit Tavan of Istanbul appeared in U.S. District Court in Milwaukee Monday. Tavan was arrested in Romania in June on an international warrant. Tavan, his Turkish company and a manager there are accused of conspiring to defraud the U.S. and to smuggle American-made products to Iran. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the indictment alleges they failed to obtain the special licenses needed to get around trade embargoes against Iran in place since 1995. Instead, the defendants allegedly negotiated the export of the engines and generators to Turkey, then re-exported them to Iran.

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