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AP Top News at 4:23 a.m. EDT

Strong aftershocks rattle devastated Italian earthquake zone
AMATRICE, Italy (AP) - Strong aftershocks rattled residents and rescue crews alike Friday as hopes began to dim that firefighters would find any more survivors from Italy's earthquake. The first funerals were scheduled for some of the 267 dead. Some of hard-hit Amatrice's crumbled buildings suffered more cracks after the biggest aftershock of the morning struck at 6:28 a.m. The U.S. Geological Service said it had a magnitude of 4.7, while the Italian geophysics institute measured it at 4.8. The aftershock was preceded by more than 50 overnight and was followed by another nine in the subsequent hour - some of the nearly 1,000 aftershocks that have rocked the seismic area of Italy's central Apennine Mountains in the two days since the original quake early Wednesday.


Trump immigration waffle reflects voter confusion on issue
AKRON, Ohio (AP) - Dean Green supports Donald Trump partly because of the GOP presidential nominee's tough, deport-them-all stance on illegal immigration. But the 57-year-old Republican paused as he complained about U.S. immigration policy and acknowledged that deporting all 11 million people in the U.S. illegally would separate families. "I don't want to break up families," Green said. It has been 30 years since the country embarked on an immigration overhaul, and the ambivalence of voters like Green is one reason why. Polls often show that majorities favor letting people illegally in the U.S. stay and also back tougher laws to deport them.


Rebels, civilians to evacuate long-besieged Damascus suburb
DARAYA, Syria (AP) - Buses, ambulances and trucks have lined up at the entrance of a blockaded Damascus suburb to evacuate rebels and civilians under a deal struck between the Syrian rebels and the government. The surrender of the Daraya suburb marks a success for President Bashar Assad's government, removing a threat only a few miles from his seat of power. Daraya's rebels agreed to evacuate in a deal late Thursday, after four years of grueling bombardment and a crippling siege that have left the sprawling suburb in ruins. The evacuations are to begin later Friday. The government is to allow 700 gunmen safe passage out of Daraya and let them head to the opposition-held northern province of Idlib.


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UN official: For Afghan women 'glass is half full'
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - As the United States prepared to invade Taliban-ruled Afghanistan 15 years ago, then-First Lady Laura Bush took over her husband's weekly radio address to tell the American people that part of the reason for going to war after the attacks of September 11, 2001, was to liberate Afghan women from the brutality that had been forced on them by the extremists' regime. As the war against the Taliban grinds on, Afghan women are still largely treated as property and barely a week goes by without news emerging of a woman or girl being stoned to death, burned with gasoline, beaten or tortured by her in-laws, traded to repay a debt, jailed for running away from a violent husband, or sold into marriage as a child.


Senegal clamps down on Quranic schools that exploit children
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) - Twelve-year-old Boubacar was picked up from the streets of Senegal's capital at night by police, along with dozens of other children, in the latest crackdown on begging. The boy was sent to this West African country by his family in neighboring Guinea to study the Quran at one of the capital's 1,600 Islamic schools, known as daaras. He is among thousands of students, or talibes, sent out by teachers to beg for money and food. Some schools have been accused of keeping the children in unsafe living conditions and abusing them. "I want to return to my family," Boubacar said at a transit center for street children.


Slain nuns leave void in Mississippi community they served
DURANT, Miss. (AP) - In the rural Mississippi community they served, two nuns found slain in their home "would do anything for anybody," friends said. The women, both nurse practitioners, were found dead Thursday morning when they didn't report to work at the nearby clinic where they provided flu shots, insulin and other medical care for children and adults who couldn't afford it. They were identified as Sister Margaret Held and Sister Paula Merrill. Dr. Elias Abboud, who worked with the sisters for years and helped build the Lexington Medical Clinic, said he's not sure what will happen to the facility in light of their deaths.


Tourist describes death, harrowing month in New Zealand bush
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) - Pavlina Pizova says she couldn't free her partner after he slipped down an icy bank and became wedged between rocks and branches. After he died, she stayed with him through the freezing night. It would take almost another month before Pizova would be rescued from the New Zealand wilderness in an ordeal she described Friday as "harrowing." The tourist from the Czech Republic, who was rescued Wednesday from a park warden's hut on the snowed-in Routeburn Track near Queenstown, broke down in tears as she read aloud her account in halting English. Czech Consul Vladka Kennett provided more details.


Top French court to rule on legality of burkini bans
PARIS (AP) - France's highest administrative court is considering whether it's legal for towns to ban body-covering burkini swimsuits, which have become a symbol of tensions around the place of Islam in secular France. After human rights groups challenged a local burkini ban, the Council of State is scheduled to issue a ruling Friday afternoon. At a hearing Thursday, lawyers for the rights groups argued that the bans are feeding fear and infringe on basic freedom. Mayors who have banned burkinis cite concern about public order after deadly Islamic extremist attacks this summer, and many officials argue that burkinis oppress women.


Official: Striking miners kill deputy minister in Bolivia
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - Striking miners in Bolivia kidnapped and beat to death the country's deputy interior minister after he traveled to the area to mediate in the bitter conflict over mining laws, officials said. Government Minister Carlos Romero called it a "cowardly and brutal killing" and asked that the body of deputy minister Rodolfo Illanes be turned over to authorities. Illanes, whose formal title is vice minister of the interior regime, was "savagely beaten" to death by the striking miners, Defense Minister Reymi Ferreira told Red Uno television, his voice breaking. Earlier, Romero had said that Illanes had been kidnapped and possibly tortured, but wasn't able to confirm reports that he had been killed by the striking informal miners, who are demanding the right to associate with private companies, among other issues.


US swimmer Lochte's legal troubles mount in Brazil
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) - Brazilian police charged American swimmer Ryan Lochte on Thursday with filing a false robbery report over an incident during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. A police statement said Lochte would be informed in the United States so he could decide whether to introduce a defense in Brazil. The indictment will also be sent to the International Olympic Committee's ethics commission, it said. "The investigation was concluded on Thursday and Olympic American swimmer Ryan Lochte was indicted for the crime of falsely reporting a crime," the statement said. It said the case was turned over to a special Brazilian court that has jurisdiction over crimes related to major sporting events.