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AP Top News at 10:09 a.m. EST

Trump looks to refocus his presidency in address to Congress
WASHINGTON (AP) - With his first address to Congress, President Donald Trump has an opportunity to refocus his young administration on the economic issues that helped him get elected. His allies hope it will help him move beyond the distractions and self-inflicted wounds that he has dealt with so far. Trump's advisers say he will use his prime-time speech Tuesday to declare early progress on his campaign promises, including withdrawing the U.S. from a sweeping Pacific Rim trade pact, and to map a path ahead on thorny legislative priorities, including health care, infrastructure, and military spending. "We're going to spend a lot more money on military," Trump told "Fox & Friends" in an interview aired Tuesday, saying he could stand to see even $30 billion more than what's being recommended.


What to watch for when Trump makes 1st address to Congress
WASHINGTON (AP) - A presidential address to Congress is always part policy speech, part political theater. With President Donald Trump, a former reality TV star, there's extra potential for drama as he makes his first address to Congress. After a chaotic start to his presidency, Trump will be trying to project his administration as ready to stride forward on top priorities such as changes to President Barack Obama's health care law and a tax overhaul. Congressional Democrats, in turn, will be trying to calibrate how strongly to oppose the Republican president in the staid setting of the House chamber, where manners still matter.


The Latest: Trump says Yemen raid gained 'tremendous' info
President Donald Trump says that a Navy SEAL who died in a raid in Yemen last month helped to collect "tremendous amounts of information." In an interview aired Tuesday on "Fox & Friends," the president acknowledged reports that Bill Owens, the father of Chief Special Warfare Operator William "Ryan" Owens, didn't want to see him when Trump went to pay respects. Trump said, "I can understand people saying that," noting that "there's nothing worse" than losing a child. Trump says that the Yemen mission had been initiated under the Obama administration, adding that Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said "it was a very successful mission.


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The strange life, and sudden death, of a North Korean exile
MACAU (AP) - The heavy-set man got out of a Macau taxi one night last September, heading to the lobby bar at one of the city's most expensive hotels. The bar at the Wynn Macau is a quiet place, where the women are often in evening dresses and the gamblers can relax with $300 Cuban cigars. He was dressed casually, nondescript really. There were no bodyguards, no flashy women. It wasn't what you'd expect for a man once tipped to be the next dictator of North Korea. But by that night, Kim Jong Nam had spent years in exile, gambling and drinking and arranging the occasional business deal as he traveled across Asia and Europe.


South Korean prosecutors indict Samsung's de facto chief
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - South Korean special prosecutors indicted Samsung's de facto chief Tuesday on bribery, embezzlement and other charges linked to a political scandal that has toppled President Park Geun-hye. The indictment of Samsung Electronics vice chairman Lee Jae-yong is a huge hit for the largest and most successful of the big businesses that dominate the South Korean economy. It also signals the still roiling state of South Korea's political and economic circles after weeks of massive demonstrations that led to Park's impeachment. The announcement of the indictment came after a three-month investigation by a special prosecution team that ended Tuesday after the country's acting leader refused a request for an extension.


Indian hometown grieves for engineer killed in Kansas bar
HYDERABAD, India (AP) - Hundreds of grieving family and friends tearfully mourned a 32-year-old engineer in his southern Indian hometown Tuesday after he was killed in an apparently racially motivated shooting in a crowded Kansas bar. Tears rolled down the cheeks of Srinivas Kuchibhotla's parents, Madhusudhan Rao and Parvatha Vardhini, as his body was cremated in Hyderabad, the capital of Telangana state. Losing a young family member is an unbearable pain, said P. L. Narayana, his uncle. "It is so cruel. He was such a kind soul, very friendly. He was so excited that he and his wife were going to start a family soon.


UN defends refugee vetting as Trump mulls revised entry ban
AMMAN, Jordan (AP) - In an office cubicle at the U.N. refugee agency, a Syrian woman and her three daughters took turns staring into a camera for iris scans. Their biometric registration, a first step toward possible resettlement in the West, is to be followed by interviews and background checks that can take months or even years. The 31-year-old part-time hairdresser, who fled to Jordan in 2014 after her husband went missing in Syria's civil war, feels fortunate. But the long road ahead for many Syrian refugees could grow even more arduous if U.S. President Donald Trump fulfils campaign vows to impose "extreme vetting."


Trump takes on entrenched practice of Washington leaks
NEW YORK (AP) - When White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer wanted to crack down on leaks last week, he collected his aides' cell phones to check for communication with reporters. The crackdown quickly leaked. President Donald Trump now says he probably would have handled the situation differently, meeting with staff one-on-one instead - but perhaps still demanding to look at their phones. "I mean, you know, there are things you can do that are a hell of a lot worse than that, I'll be honest with you," Trump told "Fox & Friends" in an interview aired Tuesday. Trump denied that there was a "major leak process" at the White House.


Oscar winning 'Moonlight' shines on Miami's Liberty City
MIAMI (AP) - Oscar winning film "Moonlight" presents a view of Miami that never shows up in a tourism video. Far from the sun and glamour of South Beach or the artists and hipsters of Wynwood, it shows predominantly black communities, truly known by few outside the people who live there. And it's recognizably their Miami, made beautiful and suddenly more hopeful than it might have seemed before. "The best thing about this movie is they actually went into the projects and shot it, and they let kids from around Liberty City be in it," said Kamal Ani-Bello, a freshman at Miami Northwestern Senior High School who had a role as an extra in the film.


Gene therapy to fight a blood cancer succeeds in major study
An experimental gene therapy that turns a patient's own blood cells into cancer killers worked in a major study, with more than one-third of very sick lymphoma patients showing no sign of disease six months after a single treatment, its maker said Tuesday. In all, 82 percent of patients had their cancer shrink at least by half at some point in the study. Its sponsor, California-based Kite Pharma, is racing Novartis AG to become the first to win approval of the treatment, called CAR-T cell therapy, in the U.S. It could become the nation's first approved gene therapy. A hopeful sign: the number in complete remission at six months - 36 percent - is barely changed from partial results released after three months, suggesting this one-time treatment might give lasting benefits for those who do respond well.