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AP Top News at 9:30 p.m. EDT

New Jersey train station crash kills 1 dead; over 100 hurt
HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) - A rush hour commuter train crashed through a barrier at the busy Hoboken station and lurched across the waiting area Thursday morning, killing one person and injuring more than 100 others in a grisly wreck that renewed questions about whether long-delayed automated safety technology could have prevented tragedy. People pulled chunks of concrete off pinned and bleeding victims, passengers kicked out windows and crawled to safety and cries and screams could be heard in the wreckage as emergency workers rushed to reach the injured in the tangle of twisted metal and dangling wires just across the Hudson River from New York City.


NJ train crash raises many familiar safety issues
WASHINGTON (AP) - The investigation into a New Jersey commuter train that hurtled into a station building Thursday raises many familiar issues from other crashes, including whether the tragedy could have been prevented or mitigated if a key safety technology had been in place. The National Transportation Safety Board, which is leading the investigation, has been calling on railroads to start using the safety technology, called positive train control, or PTC, for nearly four decades. New Jersey Transit is in the process of installing the technology, but it was not in operation yet on any of the agency's trains or tracks.


10 Things to Know for Friday
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Friday: 1. COMMUTER TRAIN CRASHES INTO STATION, KILLING ONE, INJURING SCORES The wreck in Hoboken, New Jersey, renews questions about whether long-delayed safety technology could have prevented the tragedy. 2. HOW TRUMP IS UPPING THE ANTE The GOP candidate resurrects Bill Clinton's impeachment, thrusting the former president and his infidelities into the already-rancorous presidential campaign. 3. KILLINGS IN CHICAGO REACH GRIM MILESTONE The city saw 91 homicides in August, its deadliest month in two decades. 4. WHO'S JOINING WORLD LEADERS FOR SHIMON PERES' FUNERAL Obama flies to Israel to pay tribute to a fellow Nobel Prize laureate - who also labored for peace in the Middle East but failed to achieve it.


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Dismissing risks, Trump goes all-in on Bill Clinton's past
NEW YORK (AP) - Donald Trump says he took the moral high ground at the first presidential debate by not mentioning the infidelities of former President Bill Clinton. But he hinted at them, talked about them immediately afterward and then sent his campaign's top backers out to do the same. "An impeachment for lying," Trump said Thursday at a campaign rally in New Hampshire, referring to the effort to remove Bill Clinton from office for lying about his affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. "Remember that? Impeach." The Republican nominee's decision to dredge up the former president's sexual history is a risky move in his campaign against Democrat Hillary Clinton, whose own team isn't fazed by the attack line.


Trump goes after Clinton _ Bill Clinton _ in rancorous race
BEDFORD, N.H. (AP) - Donald Trump abruptly resurrected Bill Clinton's impeachment on Thursday, adding the former president's infidelities to the already-rancorous 2016 campaign. Trump warned voters in battleground New Hampshire that a Hillary Clinton victory would bring her husband's sex scandal back to the White House. It was Trump's latest effort to bounce back from Monday night's debate performance, which has been widely panned as lackluster. In contrast, Clinton has delivered a mostly positive message in the days since her debate performance re-energized her candidacy. Clinton is stressing that her plans will solve the kind of kitchen-sink problems facing American families - the high cost of childcare, mounting student debt burdens and unpaid family leave.


Clinton struggling to win over the young voters she needs
BOULDER, Colo. (AP) - John Morales was interning for Bernie Sanders' campaign when the longshot Democratic candidate's hopes started to fade in the spring. That's when Libertarian Gary Johnson caught his interest. In many ways Johnson and Sanders are ideological opposites. The Vermont senator is an opponent of foreign trade deals and won over many younger voters in the primaries by calling for enormous government spending to guarantee universal health care and free college tuition. Johnson, the former New Mexico governor, supports smaller government and the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But he shares Sanders' outsider, tell-it-like-it-is style, social liberalism and skepticism about military intervention overseas - attributes that have won over enough Sanders supporters to worry Democrats he could jeopardize Hillary Clinton's chances in November.


UN warns of 'merciless abyss' in besieged eastern Aleppo
BEIRUT (AP) - Syrian government forces continued their push into rebel-held districts of Aleppo on Thursday as international officials issued dire warnings of an ongoing humanitarian disaster in Syria's largest city. The U.N.'s humanitarian chief Stephen O'Brien told the Security Council that the conditions in eastern Aleppo, which is besieged and assaulted by all sides by government forces, had descended into the "merciless abyss of humanitarian catastrophe." Speaking to the Security Council via video link from Geneva, O'Brien painted a grim picture of the conditions in the war-wracked eastern part of the city, where at least 320 civilians including 100 children have been killed in the past week.


Russia accuses US of nurturing aggressive nuclear strategy
MOSCOW (AP) - Amid the widening U.S.-Russian spat over Syria, the Russian Foreign Ministry on Thursday issued a strongly-worded statement accusing the Pentagon of nurturing an aggressive nuclear strategy threatening Russia. The ministry cast a recent speech by U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter as a veiled threat to back a hypothetical attack on Russia by its allies in Europe with U.S. nuclear weapons. The angry statement reflects a growing degree of mistrust and tensions between Moscow and Washington after the collapse of a U.S.-Russian cease-fire deal in Syria. On Monday, Carter accused Russia of "nuclear saber-rattling" and argued that even though the Cold War is long over, nuclear weapons are still needed to deter Russia and other potential aggressors from thinking they could get away with a nuclear attack.


More than another call: Chief talks about school shooting
TOWNVILLE, S.C. (AP) - When two volunteer firefighters rolled up to an elementary school shooting, they said they found only a wrecked black pickup truck at the playground. There was no gunman, and no one inside the truck. Within minutes, though, they performed actions that led to them being hailed as heroes throughout their tight-knit South Carolina hometown: One went inside to help treat the wounded and the other searched for the shooter. "This was more than just another call to us. This incident occurred in the school where our children and the children of the community attend," Townville Fire Chief Billy McAdams said Thursday during a news conference, pausing to collect himself as he recalled the harrowing events of the day before.


Why is Chicago a murder capital? Clues from a bloody month
CHICAGO (AP) - Fourteen-year-old Malik Causey loved the way gangs took what they wanted from people on the street, the way members fought for each other, the way they could turn drugs into cash and cash into $400 jeans. His mother tried to stop him. She yanked him out of houses where he didn't belong. She cooked up a story about Malik punching her so the police would lock him up to keep him safe for a while. Then on Aug. 21, Monique Causey woke to discover that her son had sneaked out of the house. Before she could find him, someone ended his life with a bullet to the back of his head a few blocks away.