AP Top News at 1:39 p.m. EST

Trump budget will hike defense spending by $54 billion
WASHINGTON (AP) - The White House says President Donald Trump's upcoming budget will propose a whopping $54 billion increase in defense spending and impose corresponding cuts to domestic programs and foreign aid. The result is that Trump's initial budget wouldn't dent budget deficits projected to run about $500 billion. White House budget officials outlined the information during a telephone call with reporters Monday given on condition of anonymity. The budget officials on the call ignored requests to put the briefing on the record, though Trump on Friday decried the use of anonymous sources by the media. Trump's defense budget and spending levels for domestic agency operating budgets will be revealed in a partial submission to Congress next month, with proposals on taxes and other programs coming later.


House Intel chair: Trump-Russia ties can't become witch hunt
WASHINGTON (AP) - House Intelligence chairman Devin Nunes says Congress should not begin a McCarthy-style investigation based on news reports that a few Americans with ties to President Donald Trump had contacted Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign. "We just cannot go on a witch hunt," Nunes told reporters. The Trump administration has pushed back against reports that Trump aides were in contact with Russian intelligence officials during the 2016 presidential campaign. The White House asked Nunes to call a reporter to dispute a report in another publication. Nunes said he knows of no evidence that Trump aides were in contact with Russian agents.


Oscars flap eclipses 'Moonlight' win, but civility reigns
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The 89th Academy Awards got off on the right foot, with a song and dance, but ended with the most stunning mistake ever to befall the esteemed awards show when the best picture Oscar was presented to the wrong movie. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, holding an incorrect envelope, wrongly presented the top prize to "La La Land" instead of "Moonlight." The moment at the conclusion of the Sunday-night show was so jaw-dropping, it eclipsed everything else in a ceremony that was packed to the brim with Donald Trump jabs, fun stunts, heartfelt positivity and a stunning upset by "Moonlight" over what had been a "La La" juggernaut throughout the awards season.


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Oscars mistake puts consulting firm's reputation in jeopardy
LONDON (AP) - For 82 years, accounting and consulting firm PwC has enjoyed a reputational boon from handling the balloting process at the Academy Awards. Now its hard-won image as a dependable partner is under threat. The company has apologized for a colossal mistake at the 89th Academy Awards on Sunday night when actors Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty wrongly announced the top Oscar went to "La La Land," instead of "Moonlight." The presenters, it turned out, had been given the wrong envelope by tabulators PwC, in this case the one awarding Emma Stone for best actress for her role in "La La Land." The representatives from PwC, formerly known as PricewaterhouseCoopers, eventually corrected the mistake on air but it's not clear yet how the wrong envelope ended up in the hands of the "Bonnie and Clyde" stars.


AP-NORC Poll: US teens disillusioned, divided by politics
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - In the days after President Donald Trump's election, thousands of teenagers across the nation walked out of class in protest. Others rallied to his defense. It was an unusual show of political engagement from future voters who may alter America's political landscape in 2020 - or even in next year's midterm elections. Now, a new survey of children ages 13 to 17 conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research with the permission of their parents finds that America's teens are almost as politically disillusioned and pessimistic about the nation's divisions as their parents. The difference?


911 call: Bar shooting suspect said he'd killed 'Iranians'
OLATHE, Kan. (AP) - A bartender at the restaurant where a man was arrested last week for an apparently racially motivated bar shooting in Kansas told a 911 dispatcher that the man admitted shooting two Iranians and needed a place to stay for a couple of days. A recording from Henry County, Missouri, 911 reveals that the bartender warned police not to approach the building with sirens blaring or the man would "freak out" and "something bad's going to happen." The man, Adam Purinton, 51, of Olathe, is scheduled to appear in court Monday. He has been charged with first-degree murder and first-degree attempted murder.


AP Exclusive: Ex-congregants reveal years of ungodly abuse
SPINDALE, N.C. (AP) - From all over the world, they flocked to this tiny town in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, lured by promises of inner peace and eternal life. What many found instead: years of terror - waged in the name of the Lord. Congregants of the Word of Faith Fellowship were regularly punched, smacked, choked, slammed to the floor or thrown through walls in a violent form of deliverance meant to "purify" sinners by beating out devils, 43 former members told The Associated Press in separate, exclusive interviews. Victims of the violence included pre-teens and toddlers - even crying babies, who were vigorously shaken, screamed at and sometimes smacked to banish demons.


Plaintiffs: 5 automakers knew Takata air bags were dangerous
DETROIT (AP) - Plaintiffs in dozens of lawsuits against air bag maker Takata and five automakers allege the car companies knew that Takata's products were dangerous yet continued to use them for years in order to save money. The allegations against Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Ford and BMW were made in a filing Monday with a federal court in Miami, which is handling pretrial evidence-gathering in lawsuits against Takata and the automakers. The filing says documents produced in the case show the auto companies had independent knowledge that Takata's air bag inflators were unsafe before putting them in millions of vehicles.


Drought, hunger push Somalis to flee amid fears of famine
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) - Her eyes glued to the feeble movements of her malnourished baby with protruding ribs and sunken eyes, Fadumo Abdi Ibrahim struggled to hold back her tears in the stifling and crowded feeding center in Somalia's capital. She waved a scrap of fabric over him to create a current of air. She is one of thousands of desperate people streaming into Somalia's capital seeking food as a result a prolonged drought, overwhelming local and international aid agencies. The Somali government warns of a looming famine. An estimated 5 million Somalis, out of population of 10 million, need humanitarian assistance, according to the U.N.


Here's what happened onstage during the Oscars' mistake
If it were in the screenplay of a Hollywood drama - or maybe farce - directors would surely reject it. But let's set the scene anyway for the Academy Awards drama over what film did, and didn't, win the Oscar for best picture on Sunday night. We pan in on the stage of the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, where actors Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway are about to announce best picture, the culmination of entertainment's biggest awards show. Beatty opens a red envelope and looks at the card inside, giving a double-take. He looks inside the envelope to see if there's anything else there.