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Florida, angry and grieving, takes gun protest to streets
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) - Thousands of angry students, parents, teachers and neighbors of a Florida high school where 17 people were killed demanded on Saturday that immediate action be taken on gun-control legislation, insisting they would not relent until their demands were met. The rally in downtown Fort Lauderdale gave a political outlet to the growing feelings of rage and mourning sparked by the carnage at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Authorities say a former student who had been expelled, had mental health issues and been reported to law enforcement, used a legally purchased semiautomatic rifle to kill students and staff.


A fire alarm sounds, then gunfire erupts: Stay or flee?
Students and teachers responded as trained when the fire alarm sounded, streaming out of the school and toward exits only to run into deadly gunfire. Two boys with stolen guns took aim from a wooded hill, waiting for people to evacuate after one of the boys had triggered a false fire alarm. They killed four children and a teacher. That was 20 years ago at Arkansas' Westside Middle School, before active-shooter drills became part of the routine for schools across America. Students today are taught to evacuate during fire alarms but lock down during school shootings. So there was confusion Wednesday when a fire alarm sounded - the second one that day - at a Florida high school as 19-year-old former student Nikolas Cruz unleashed a barrage of gunfire.


Trump adviser: Russian meddling 'incontrovertible'
MUNICH (AP) - President Donald Trump's national security adviser said Saturday there was "incontrovertible" evidence of a Russian plot to disrupt the 2016 U.S. election, a blunt statement that shows how significantly the new criminal charges leveled by an American investigator have upended the political debate over his inquiry. The statement by H.R. McMaster at the Munich Security Conference stood in stark contrast to Trump's oft repeated claim that Russian interference in his election victory was a hoax. "As you can see with the FBI indictment, the evidence is now really incontrovertible and available in the public domain," McMaster told a Russian delegate to the conference.


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Biden, in public and private, tiptoes toward a 2020 run
WASHINGTON (AP) - Former Vice President Joe Biden is tiptoeing toward a potential run in 2020, even broaching the possibility during a recent gathering of longtime foreign policy aides. Huddled in his newly opened office steps from the U.S. Capitol, Biden began a planning meeting for his new diplomacy center by addressing the elephant in the room. He said he was keeping his 2020 options open, considering it a real possibility. He insisted he had made no decision, and didn't need to yet, according to five people who either attended the meeting or were briefed on it by those who did.


Copter on quake mission flips in Mexico, kills 13 on ground
MEXICO CITY (AP) - A military helicopter carrying officials who were assessing damage from a powerful earthquake flipped as it was attempting to land in southern Mexico, crashing on top of people who had fled their homes and were spending the night outside. Thirteen people were killed - the only known fatalities related to the quake - and 16 were injured. No one aboard the helicopter, including Interior Secretary Alfonso Navarrete and Oaxaca Gov. Alejandro Murat, was seriously hurt. Jorge Morales, a local reporter who was aboard the helicopter when it crashed Friday night, described harrowing moments as the pilot lost control and the helicopter attempted to touch down in a swirl of dust in Jamiltepec, a city in Oaxaca state close to the epicenter of the earthquake that struck earlier Friday.


Are female-led companies the answer to sexual misconduct?
NEW YORK (AP) - The Weinstein Co. thought it had found a path to survival. A group of investors led by a respected businesswoman offered to acquire the company, rebrand it and install a female-led board of directors. It was an eye-catching idea in a country where men dominate corporate boards in almost every industry. Unmoved, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman threw a wrench in the deal, filing a lawsuit against the company partly out of concern that executives who failed to protect Harvey Weinstein's accusers would continue to run the operation. Swiftly, the Weinstein Co. fired its president and chief operating officer, David Glasser, late Friday, only five days after the lawsuit.


Rodchenkov: Gov't order to protect doped Russian footballers
Russian soccer players were protected from being caught doping under direct government orders that laboratory director Grigory Rodchenkov said he followed to ensure cheating was covered up as part of a far-reaching conspiracy. Outlining his involvement in soccer for the first time to The Associated Press, Rodchenkov claimed an instruction to "avoid any scandal" came from then-sports minister Vitaly Mutko, who now serves as a deputy prime minister despite being involved in the doping scheme. "Russian footballers were immune from doping-control actions or sanctions," Rodchenkov said in response to questions through his lawyer from his hiding place in the United States.


Self-proclaimed 'icon' Adam Rippon takes final Olympic skate
GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) - Adam Rippon put his hands over his face and let the cheers wash over. He waved and smiled, and when the crowd kept clapping, he jumped where he stood and swung his arms to egg them on. Ever the showman, and with his trademark grace and flair, Rippon took his final skate of the Pyeongchang Olympics on Saturday. He finished 10th, a fine result for a 28-year-old who was never expected to medal against a field populated by younger, higher-flying competition. The self-proclaimed "icon" didn't need that hardware to leave his mark on these games. Or for the Olympics to leave its mark on him.


Pope revives lapsed sex abuse commission amid skepticism
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope Francis revived his lapsed sex abuse advisory commission by naming new members Saturday, after coming under fire for his overall handling of the scandal and his support for a Chilean bishop accused by victims of witnessing and ignoring their abuse. The announcement of the new members of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors came on the same day that a Vatican investigator will take the testimony in New York of one of the main whistleblowers in the Chilean cover-up scandal. Francis tasked Archbishop Charles Scicluna with the fact-finding mission into Bishop Juan Barros after he came under blistering criticism in Chile for defending Barros and calling the victims' cover-up accusations against him slander.


Israel's Netanyahu: A singular leader with a divisive legacy
A serial survivor of scandals, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appears to be in trouble once more after police recommended a range of bribery and other charges against him in two separate investigations. Yet the law doesn't require him to step down until convicted, the process could drag on for months, and the determined, loquacious leader is digging in his heels. For now, his coalition is lining up behind him, but public opinion could change that. If his Likud Party concludes he has become a liability, minnows could quickly turn into sharks and the party could replace him and retain power with the existing coalition.