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Trump denounces 'horrible' threats against Jewish centers
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump on Tuesday denounced recent threats against Jewish community centers as "horrible ... painful" and said more must be done "to root out hate and prejudice and evil." Trump made the remarks after touring the newly opened National Museum of African American History and Culture. "This tour was a meaningful reminder of why we have to fight bigotry, intolerance and hatred in all of its very ugly forms," Trump said. On Monday, 11 Jewish community centers across the country received phoned-in bomb threats, according to the JCC Association of North America. Like three waves of similar calls in January, Monday's threats proved to be hoaxes, the association said in a statement.


US to increase number of immigrants targeted for deportation
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Homeland Security Department is greatly expanding the number of people living in the U.S. illegally who are considered a deportation priority. The new guidelines under President Donald Trump call for the deportation of any individuals in the country illegally if they are convicted, charged or suspected of a crime, which could include traffic infractions. Department memos released Tuesday eliminate guidelines under the Obama administration that focused enforcement on immigrants in the United States illegally who have been convicted of serious crimes or are a threat to national security. The Obama administration also focused its enforcement resources on people who had just crossed the border.


Trump's new national security adviser a soldier-scholar
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump has chosen as his national security adviser a soldier-scholar who fought in both Iraq wars and wrote an influential book that called out the U.S. government for "lies" that led to the Vietnam War. Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster would remain on active military duty while leading the National Security Council, White House officials said Monday. He joined two retired generals - Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly - already in Trump's inner circle, adding to the impression that the president prefers military men in top roles. Trump called McMaster "a man of tremendous talent and tremendous experience" when he introduced his new national security adviser at his private Florida club.


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Israeli court gives soldier 18 months for fatal shooting
TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) - An Israeli military court on Tuesday sentenced a soldier to 18 months in prison for his deadly shooting of a Palestinian attacker who lay wounded on the ground, capping a nearly yearlong saga that has deeply divided the country. The sentence, which included a year's probation and a demotion in rank, was lighter than expected. Prosecutors had asked for a prison term of three to five years. Palestinians dismissed the sentence as a "joke." Yet it still triggered disappointment from several hundred protesters who had gathered outside the Tel Aviv court and had hoped to see the soldier walk free.


In Trump's future looms a familiar shutdown threat
WASHINGTON (AP) - Add a potential government shutdown to President Donald Trump's growing roster of headaches. Beneath the capital's radar looms a vexing problem - a catchall spending package that's likely to top $1 trillion and could get embroiled in the politics of building Trump's wall at the U.S.-Mexico border and a budget-busting Pentagon request. While a shutdown deadline has a few weeks to go, the huge measure looms as an unpleasant reality check for Trump and Republicans controlling Congress. Despite the big power shift in Washington, the path to success - and averting a shuttering of the government - goes directly through Senate Democrats, whose votes are required to pass the measure.


Supreme Court seems split in case of boy's death near border
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court appears to be evenly divided about the right of Mexican parents to use American courts to sue a U.S. Border Patrol agent who fired across the U.S.-Mexican border and killed their teenage son. Justice Anthony Kennedy and other conservative justices suggested during argument Tuesday that the boy's death on the Mexican side of the border was enough to keep the matter out of U.S. courts. The four liberal justices indicated they would support the parents' lawsuit because the shooting happened close to the border in an area in which the two nations share responsibility for upkeep.


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NEW YORK (AP) - The city medical examiner was expected to perform an autopsy Tuesday on Russia's ambassador to the United Nations, who died a day earlier after falling ill at his office at Russia's U.N. mission. Spokeswoman Julie Bolcer said the case was referred to the office by the hospital. The medical examiner is responsible for investigating deaths that occur by criminal violence, accident, suicide, suddenly or when the person seemed healthy, or if someone died in any unusual or suspicious manner. Most of the deaths investigated by the office are not suspicious. Vitaly Churkin, who died a day before his 65th birthday, had been Russia's envoy at the United Nations since 2006.


Testosterone gel shows no benefit for older men's memories
CHICAGO (AP) - Testosterone treatment did not improve older men's memory or mental function in the latest results from landmark government research that challenges the anti-aging claims of popular supplements. While testosterone use for one year appeared to strengthen bones and reduce anemia, it also showed signs of worsening artery disease and questions remain about other potential risks. The researchers said more studies are needed to determine long-term effects - the kind of research the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has already asked supplement makers to conduct. "I don't think anybody would interpret these results as saying, 'Wow, this is a fountain of youth, this is a magical anti-aging potion,'" said study co-author Susan Ellenberg, a University of Pennsylvania researcher.


Sticker shock for olive oil buyers after bad Italian harvest
ROME (AP) - From specialty shops in Rome to supermarkets around the world, lovers of Italian olive oil are in for some sticker shock this year, with prices due to jump by as much as 20 percent. The combination of bad weather and pests hit the harvest in Southern Europe, most of all in Italy, where production is halved from last fall. That's pushing up Italian wholesale prices by 64 percent as of mid-February compared with a year earlier, which translates to shelf price increases of 15 to 20 percent in Italy. In other countries, the ultimate price increases will depend on several factors - such as how much retailers take on the costs themselves and the change in currency values.