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AP Top News at 1:16 p.m. EST

Chicago mayor fires police chief in wake of video release
CHICAGO (AP) - Mayor Rahm Emanuel fired the city's police superintendent Tuesday, a week after the release of a dash-cam video that showed a white Chicago officer fatally shooting a black teenager 16 times. Emanuel called a news conference to announce the dismissal of Garry McCarthy, who only days ago insisted to reporters that the mayor had his "back." The mayor praised McCarthy's leadership of the force but called it an "undeniable fact" that the public's trust in the police had eroded. "Now is the time for fresh eyes and new leadership," Emanuel said. Protesters have been calling for McCarthy's dismissal in response to the handling of the death of Laquan McDonald, a 17-year-old who was killed in October 2014.

US sending more special ops forces to fight Islamic State
WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. is expanding its special operations force in Iraq and Syria to help fight Islamic State militants, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Tuesday. The additional troops will help Iraqi and Kurdish forces battling IS. Carter told the House Armed Services Committee that over time, these special operators will be able to conduct raids, free hostages, gather intelligence and capture Islamic State leaders. Carter said that will improve intelligence and generate more targets for attacks. Carter did not offer troop numbers amid a growing call from some Republicans for more U.S. boots on the ground and a divide among war-weary Americans about the prospect of greater military involvement.

Appalachia grasps for hope as coal jobs fade
WELCH, W.Va. (AP) - The seams of coal in some of Eddie Asbury's mines in McDowell County are so thin workers can barely squeeze down them. They enter on carts nearly flat on their backs, the roof of the mine coursing by just a few inches in front of their faces. They don't stand up all day. To keep his business operating with such a paltry amount of coal, Asbury has to do everything himself. He has no use for the shiny, multimillion-dollar mining machines on display this fall at the biannual coal show nearby. His equipment is secondhand stuff that he repairs and refurbishes. The coal he and his workers scrape out of the mountain is washed and prepared for sale in a plant Asbury and a colleague built themselves.

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House considers requiring search warrant to get old emails
WASHINGTON (AP) - Investigators would need a search warrant to get people's old emails under a bill considered Tuesday by a House panel looking to update a nearly 30-year-old federal law to reflect today's communications. The Email Privacy Act, co-authored by Rep. Kevin Yoder, R-Kan., and Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., has broad bipartisan support and would close a loophole in the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which passed before online storage became so convenient and inexpensive. The law gave the government access to emails older than 180 days with just a subpoena. The emails were considered abandoned at the time, when there was rarely enough storage space to hold emails longer than six months.

Los Angeles deputy describes rescuing newborn buried alive
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Los Angeles County sheriff's Deputy Adam Collette knelt on the asphalt and heard the muffled cries of a baby who had been buried alive. He pried up two large pieces of asphalt, dug out loose dirt and plucked the newborn girl from the hole along a bike path, cradling her in his arms. "I think the baby had a sigh of relief, and so did I," Collette said Monday. "We kind of felt each other like, 'Hey, everything's going to be OK." The girl, estimated to be 24 to 36 hours old when she was found Friday, was healthy and in stable condition at a hospital.

Southern California man dies in crash hours after good deed
SAN DIEGO (AP) - A San Diego-area woman is working to honor the memory of a stranger who died hours after he paid for her groceries and asked her to "pay it forward." Matthew Jackson, of Oceanside, was killed in a crash on Nov. 11, less than 24 hours after he met Jamie-Lynne Knighten, KNSD-TV in San Diego reported ( ). Knighten was ahead of Jackson in line to pay for her groceries with her crying infant when her card was declined. That's when Jackson stepped up and offered to foot the bill, which came to more than $200. The 28-year-old wanted one thing in return.

Police investigate death of Alaska's capital city mayor
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) - The newly elected mayor of Alaska's capital city was found dead at his Juneau home, and police are investigating a range of possible causes. The Juneau Police Department released few details on the death of Stephen "Greg" Fisk, 70, but called rumors of an assault "speculation." Fisk's adult son found his body Monday and alerted authorities, police said in a statement. An attack is "one of the possibilities out there, but there's others that could have happened," Police Chief Bryce Johnson told the Juneau Empire newspaper. "There could've been a fall. There's lots of things that would cause it." He noted there was no evidence of forced entry into Fisk's home.

Obama says parts of climate deal must be legally binding
PARIS (AP) - Parts of a global climate agreement being hammered out in Paris should be legally binding, President Barack Obama said Tuesday. His declaration was both a boost to climate negotiators seeking a tough accord and a challenge to Republican senators, many of whom don't believe that global warming is real. Whether or not to make the climate accord legally binding is a major sticking-point at the two-week talks in Paris, which aim to get all countries to agree to cut emissions that scientists say are warming the Earth and increasing extreme weather such as droughts and floods. Obama has spent months prodding other countries to make ambitious carbon-cutting pledges to the agreement, which would last long beyond the end of his presidency in early 2017.

Rising cigarette taxes tied to lower infant deaths: Study
CHICAGO (AP) - When it costs more to smoke, fewer babies die, according to a new study that links rising cigarette taxes with declines in infant mortality, especially among blacks. With nearly 4 million annual births nationwide, the results suggest that a $1 increase in cigarette taxes would be expected to lead to 750 fewer infant deaths each year, the researchers said. Smoking during pregnancy can lead to complications including sometimes dangerous premature births and sudden infant death syndrome. U.S. smoking rates declined during years examined in the study - 1999 to 2010. The research, paid for by the National Institutes of Health, was published online Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics.

Mexico experts: passageway may lead to Aztec ruler's tomb
MEXICO CITY (AP) - A Mexican archaeologist said his team has found a tunnel-like passageway that apparently leads to two sealed chambers, the latest chapter in the search for the as-yet undiscovered tomb of an Aztec ruler. The Aztecs are believed to have cremated the remains of their leaders during their 1325-1521 rule, but the final resting place of the cremains has never been found. Outside experts said Tuesday the find at Mexico City's Templo Mayor ruin complex would be significant. The National Institute of Anthropology and History said Monday that a team led by archaeologist Leonardo Lopez Lujan had discovered an 8.4-meter (27-foot) long tunnel leading into the center of a circular platform where dead rulers were believed to be cremated.