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AP Top News at 11:28 a.m. EDT

Failure on health bill also hurts prospects for tax overhaul
WASHINGTON (AP) - House Republicans' failure to repeal Barack Obama's health care law deals a serious blow to another big part of President Donald Trump's agenda: tax reform. Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., say they will soon turn their attention to the first major re-write of the tax code in more than 30 years. But they will have to do it without the momentum of victory on health care. Just as important, the loss on health care will deprive Republicans of $1 trillion in tax cuts. The GOP health plan would have repealed nearly $1 trillion in taxes enacted under Obama's Affordable Care Act.


Now what? Options for next year as health law drama fades
As the political drama over health care legislation in Washington fades, the rest of the country faces a more immediate concern: Getting insurance for next year. The Republican health plan designed to replace the Obama-era health law known as the Affordable Care Act would not have taken full effect for a few years anyway - and now it's dead. "We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future," House Speaker Paul Ryan said Friday. That means millions of Americans will have to navigate a current federal health care system that, while not "imploding" as President Donald J. Trump has said, is at least in flux.


Many governors welcome demise of GOP health care bill
CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) - Governors of both parties had warned Congress for weeks that the Republican health care bill threatened to saddle their states with big costs and potentially leave millions of people without coverage, especially because of the cutbacks planned to Medicaid. The bill's withdrawal on Friday left in place the status quo under the Affordable Care Act. That was welcomed by several governors in the states that opted to expand Medicaid under former President Barack Obama's law. The Medicaid expansion has provided coverage for 11 million people in the 31 states that accepted it. "I am pleased today's vote has been held as this bill would drastically affect the Commonwealth's ability to ensure essential care for thousands of people," Massachusetts Gov.


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Analysis: The outsider dealmaker faltering in White House
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump campaigned as an outsider - celebrating his lack of political experience by selling himself as a dealmaker willing to buck Republican orthodoxy and his own party's leadership. He alone would reshape Washington. He's tried governing the same way. His actions are a blitz. He rarely consults old Washington hands. And he hangs the threat of retribution over anyone who challenges him. And now he and his party have been dealt a stinging defeat on a signature campaign promise, a defeat that further weakens a president whose approval rating has hovered under 40 percent and humiliates Republicans who have pledged for seven long years to undo President Barack Obama's health care law.


Gorsuch hearings show him as careful, folksy, testy at times
WASHINGTON (AP) - Nominees appearing before the Senate all have one goal in mind: Win confirmation. And when one party controls the Senate and the White House, the strategy of saying as little as possible doesn't vary much. But because Supreme Court nominees spend several long days in televised hearings, they still manage to reveal a few things about themselves, professionally and personally. Here are a few things we learned about Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump's pick for the high court: --- A DELIBERATE MANNER Gorsuch was careful in his phrasing, rarely appeared to allow his pulse to quicken and steadfastly refused the many Democratic attempts to get him to talk about abortion, guns, campaign finance and a host of key issues in a way that might signal how he'd rule on the Supreme Court.


Latest Rikers brutality case fuels debate over jail's future
NEW YORK (AP) - The latest in a string of brutality cases against Rikers Island guards has added fuel to a growing debate on whether New York City's notoriously violent jail complex has become so dysfunctional it should be shut down. At least 35 staff members at Rikers have faced criminal charges in the past three years, including 13 for assault or attempted assault. Federal prosecutors have also charged more than a half dozen Rikers guards with violating inmates' civil rights through excessive force, smuggling drugs and other charges since 2014. "Rikers Island is one of these long-term injustices and abuses that every New Yorker should be outraged about," said New York Gov.


London attacker taught English in Saudi Arabia for 2 years
LONDON (AP) - The British man who killed four people during a London rampage had made three trips to Saudi Arabia: He taught English there twice on a work visa and returned on a visa usually granted to those going on a religious pilgrimage. More details about attacker Khalid Masood's travels, confirmed by the Saudi Arabian embassy in Britain, emerged Saturday amid a massive British police effort to discover how a homegrown ex-con with a violent streak became radicalized and why he launched a deadly attack Wednesday on Westminster Bridge. The embassy said he taught English in Saudi Arabia from November 2005 to November 2006 and again from April 2008 to April 2009, with a legitimate work visa both times.


Colorado weighs strategy for guarding against pot crackdown
DENVER (AP) - Colorado is considering an unusual strategy to protect its nascent marijuana industry from a potential federal crackdown, even at the expense of hundreds of millions of dollars in tax collections. A bill pending in the Legislature would allow pot growers and retailers to reclassify their recreational pot as medical pot if a change in federal law or enforcement occurs. It's the boldest attempt yet by a U.S. marijuana state to avoid federal intervention in its weed market. The bill would allow Colorado's 500 or so licensed recreational pot growers to instantly reclassify their weed. A switch would cost the state more than $100 million a year because Colorado taxes medical pot much more lightly than recreational weed - 2.9 percent versus 17.9 percent.


Security, parking, garbage irk Ivanka Trump's DC neighbors
WASHINGTON (AP) - Residents of a posh Washington neighborhood say the Trump clan doesn't make for very good neighbors, hogging parking on an already crowded street and leaving trash bags rotting on the curb. A big part of the complaint: a huge security presence, with even a trip to the playground requiring three vans. Neighbors of Trump, her husband Jared Kushner and their three children have groused that sidewalks have been closed, public parking overrun and that the family and their staff can't even be bothered to learn the trash pickup schedule outside their $5.5-million home. "It has been a three-ring circus from the day that they've moved in," said Marietta Robinson, who lives across the street, speaking with The Associated Press.


Man carrying a sword, dressed as Joker arrested in Virginia
WINCHESTER, Va. (AP) - Police in Virginia have arrested a man who was dressed as comic book villain the Joker and reportedly carrying a sword. Winchester Police Department spokeswoman Jennifer Hall said in a news release that the department got several 911 calls Friday afternoon reporting a man made up as Batman's nemesis. He was wearing a cape and carrying a sword. Thirty-one-year-old Jeremy Putman has been charged with wearing a mask in public, a felony that can result in a year in jail. It wasn't immediately clear whether Putman has a lawyer.






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