AP WIRE: NEWS

AP Top News at 2:22 a.m. EDT

Clinton, Trump buff foreign policy bona fides on debate eve
NEW YORK (AP) - Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were meeting separately with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Sunday, giving each candidate fresh foreign policy talking points on the eve of their first presidential debate. Clinton met Sunday evening with Netanyahu for less than an hour in Manhattan, according to Clinton campaign officials. Her meeting came after Trump sat down with the prime minister at his residence in Trump Tower in the morning, Israeli and Trump campaign officials said. Reporters were barred from covering either meeting. Clintons' campaign said in a statement that the two had an "in-depth conversation." She stressed that "a strong and secure Israel is vital to the United States" and "reaffirmed unwavering commitment" to the relationship.


Clinton as communicator, from Wellesley to campaign trail
NEW YORK (AP) - Hillary Clinton has said it herself: She's not the most naturally gifted public communicator. "I am not a natural politician, in case you haven't noticed, like my husband or President Obama," she said in March. Yet her first public speech was a star-making one, landing her in a Life magazine write-up at the tender age of 21. She was a senior at Wellesley, the first student chosen to address a commencement there. Unhappy with the words of the U.S. senator invited to speak before her, she parried with an unplanned rebuke, before launching into her prepared remarks.


Road to debate: Trump built image as he built business
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump once claimed to be publicity shy. No joke. It's right there in The New York Times of Nov. 1, 1976. In the same article, the 30-year-old real estate developer talks up his millions, showcases his penthouse apartment and Cadillac, and allows a reporter to tag along as he visits job sites and lunches at the "21" club before hopping an evening flight to California for more deal-making. So much for that shy-guy claim. Young and ambitious, Trump worked just as hard at building his image as he did at expanding his real estate empire. Along the way, he honed the communications skills that would benefit him at the negotiating table, turn him into a reality TV star and launch a presidential campaign.


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Arnold Palmer dies at 87, made golf popular for masses
Arnold Palmer brought a country club sport to the masses with a hard-charging style, charisma and a commoner's touch. At ease with both presidents and the golfing public, and on a first-name basis with both, "The King" died Sunday in Pittsburgh. He was 87. Alastair Johnston, CEO of Arnold Palmer Enterprises, confirmed that Palmer died Sunday afternoon of complications from heart problems. Johnston said Palmer was admitted to the UPMC Hospital on Thursday for some cardiovascular work and weakened over the last few days. "Today marks the passing of an era," said Johnston, Palmer's longtime agent at IMG. "Arnold Palmer's influence, profile and achievements spread far beyond the game of golf.


Some of Arnold Palmer's greatest wins
If there was a single swing that made him "The King," the driver Arnold Palmer hit on the first hole at Cherry Hills was it. Trailing by seven heading into the final round of the 1960 U.S. Open - and angered by a sports writer who, during a lunch break, told him he had no chance at a comeback - Palmer pulled the persimmon wood out on the tee box of the downhill, 346-yard hole. Palmer lashed at the balata-covered ball, which flew through the thin air, into the rough for one small hop, then tumbled onto the green. He made birdie and his greatest comeback was underway.


Building a life in Germany, a Syrian watches war at home
SAARBRUECKEN, Germany (AP) - At the intersection, Mohammed al-Haj waited patiently for the "green man." It seemed a bit silly: No cars were coming, no policemen watching. Back home in Syria, he wouldn't hesitate. But here in Germany, it's the law, you only cross when the walk light is green. "I don't want to get into the habit of not waiting for him," said the 27-year-old Mohammed. "We must all respect German customs and traditions." This is one world Mohammed lives in, one guided by rules, where he says he knows his rights and his responsibilities. It's a world where he can be ambitious and plan for the future, even as he tries to negotiate his place in a country where he arrived a year ago among hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing to Western Europe.


Mall shooting suspect: 'Creepy,' multiple arrests, disputes
OAK HARBOR, Wash. (AP) - The 20-year-old man suspected of killing five people with a rifle at a Macy's makeup counter had a string of run-ins with the law in recent years, including charges he assaulted his stepfather, and was described by a neighbor as so "creepy, rude and obnoxious" that she kept a Taser by her front door. As investigators tried to piece together information on Arcan Cetin, who was arrested Saturday evening after a nearly 24-hour manhunt, a picture emerged of a troubled young man. Court records show more than a half-dozen criminal cases in Island County alone since 2013.


Protests remain peaceful outside Charlotte Panthers NFL game
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - Nightly protests have shaken the city of Charlotte since the shooting death of a black man by police last week, but Sunday's NFL game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings was played without interruption. A group of around 100 demonstrators gathered across the street from Bank of America Stadium to keep up the pressure in the aftermath of the death of Keith Lamont Scott. The 43-year-old man was shot and killed Tuesday after a confrontation with Charlotte police. Six nights of protests have followed, the first two of them violent. On Sunday, protesters led by a man with a bullhorn across the street from Bank of America Stadium were surrounded by at least two dozen police officers on bicycles.


Bomb case is latest hardship for NJ's large Muslim community
PATERSON, N.J. (AP) - At the Islamic Center of Passaic County, which draws about 2,000 people each Friday for communal prayers, the talk is about how this year is different. After the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, people of other faiths in the surrounding community were generally able to see the difference between the radical perpetrators and American Muslims, said Omar Awad, president of the center. But he suggested that distinction seems to be blurring in the public mind amid the anti-Muslim rhetoric of the presidential campaign and growing anger over terrorist strikes in Europe and the United States, the latest allegedly plotted by a New Jersey Muslim.


Colombia to sign historic peace deal on ending long conflict
CARTAGENA, Colombia (AP) - Colombia will take a big step toward emerging from its long nightmare of bloody violence Monday when the government and the country's largest rebel movement sign a peace accord that emerged from four hard years of negotiations. The significance of the deal can't be overstated: Colombia's five-decade conflict, partly fueled by the nation's cocaine trade, has killed more than 220,000 people and driven 8 million from their homes. Underlining the importance of the day, the pact is being signed by Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and by the top commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, a rebel fighter known by the alias Timochenko.

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