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Major raids conducted after London attack; 7 arrested
LONDON (AP) - British police conducted major raids and arrested seven people in connection with the attack outside Parliament that left four dead, including the man who mowed down pedestrians on a bridge and fatally stabbed an officer, a senior police official said Thursday. Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley said that he believed the attacker acted alone and was "inspired by international terrorism." Police searched six addresses, including some in the central city of Birmingham, and arrested seven people in connection with Wednesday's attack by a knife-wielding man, Rowley said. Rowley refused to give details about the attacker, who first struck pedestrians with an SUV on Westminster Bridge and then fatally stabbed a police officer on Parliament's grounds.


The Latest: UK defense minister praises police after attack
Britain's defense secretary has praised the work of police officers after the attack outside Parliament by a knife-wielding man driving an SUV. Michael Fallon says that a "very urgent investigation" had been going on around the clock to determine whether "anybody else was involved." Earlier, police said they believe the attacker who killed three people, including a police officer, acted alone and was "inspired by international terrorism." Police have conducted major raids overnight and detained seven people.


AP Exclusive: US probes banking of ex-Trump campaign chief
WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. Treasury Department agents have recently obtained information about offshore financial transactions involving President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, as part of a federal anti-corruption probe into his work in Eastern Europe, The Associated Press has learned. Information about Manafort's transactions was turned over earlier this year to U.S. agents working in the Treasury Department's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network by investigators in Cyprus at the U.S. agency's request, a person familiar with the case said, speaking on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss a criminal investigation. The Cyprus attorney general, one of the country's top law enforcement officers, was made aware of the American request.


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10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. RAIDS LEAD TO ARRESTS IN LONDON ATTACK British police also believe the knife-wielding assailant, who killed three outside Parliament with his vehicle and weapon, acted alone and was "inspired by international terrorism." 2. AP: US PROBES BANKING OF EX-TRUMP CAMPAIGN CHIEF U.S. Treasury Department agents have obtained information about offshore financial transactions involving Paul Manafort as part of a federal anti-corruption probe into his work in Eastern Europe, the AP learns. 3. HEALTH BILL HOURS FROM SHOWDOWN VOTE Short of support, Republican leaders look to Trump to close the deal with a crucial bloc of conservatives, the first major legislative test of his young presidency.


GOP health bill on the brink hours from House showdown vote
WASHINGTON (AP) - The GOP's long-promised legislation to repeal and replace "Obamacare" stood on the brink just hours before Republican leaders planned to put it on the House floor for a showdown vote. Short of support, GOP leaders looked to President Donald Trump to close the deal with a crucial bloc of conservatives, in the first major legislative test of his young presidency. The stakes could hardly be higher for a party that gained monopoly control of Washington largely on promises to get rid of former President Barack Obama's signature legislative achievement and replace it with something better. Now Republicans are staring at the possibility of failure at the very moment of truth, an outcome that would be a crushing political defeat for Trump and Hill GOP leaders and would throw prospects for other legislative achievements into extreme uncertainty.


US combat airlift marks deepening involvement in Syria
WASHINGTON (AP) - The United States is deepening its involvement in the war against the Islamic State group after an unprecedented American airlift of Arab and Kurdish fighters to the front lines in northern Syria, supported by the first use of U.S. attack helicopters and artillery in the country. The U.S. forces didn't engage in ground combat, but the offensive suggests the Trump administration is taking an increasingly aggressive approach as it plans an upcoming assault on the extremists' self-declared capital of Raqqa. In addition to using helicopters to ferry rebels into combat near the Tabqa Dam on the Euphrates River, the U.S.


Former colleagues, judges to testify for Supreme Court pick
WASHINGTON (AP) - Lawyers, advocacy groups and former colleagues get their say on President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee after Judge Neil Gorsuch emerged unscathed from two days of tough questioning at his confirmation hearing. Assured of support from majority Republicans, Gorsuch received glowing GOP reviews but complaints from frustrated Democrats that he concealed his views from the American public. Gorsuch, a federal appeals court judge in Denver, refused repeated attempts to get him to talk about key legal and political issues of the day. But he did tell Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who worried that Gorsuch would vote to restrict abortion, that "no one is looking to return us to horse and buggy days."


South Korean ferry that sank 3 years ago lifted from sea
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface Thursday nearly three years after it capsized and sank into violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the country as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people - most of whom were students on a high school trip - died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures. Public outrage over what was seen as a botched rescue job by the government contributed to the recent ouster of Park Geun-hye as president.


Less-educated middle-age US whites dying younger than others
WASHINGTON (AP) - Middle-age white Americans with limited education are increasingly dying younger, on average, than other middle-age U.S. adults, a trend driven by their dwindling economic opportunities, research by two Princeton University economists has found. The economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, argue in a paper released Thursday that the loss of steady middle-income jobs for those with high school degrees or less has triggered broad problems for this group. They are more likely than their college-educated counterparts, for example, to be unemployed, unmarried or afflicted with poor health. "This is a story of the collapse of the white working class," Deaton said in an interview.


Some of the youngest opioid victims are curious toddlers
MILWAUKEE (AP) - Curious toddlers find the drugs in a mother's purse or accidentally dropped on the floor. Sometimes a parent fails to secure the child-resistant cap on a bottle of painkillers. No matter how it happens, if a 35-pound toddler grabs just one opioid pill, chews it and releases the full concentration of a time-released adult drug into their small bodies, death can come swiftly. These are some of the youngest victims of the nation's opioid epidemic - children under age 5 who die after swallowing opioids. The number of children's deaths is still small relative to the overall toll from opioids, but toddler fatalities have climbed steadily over the last 10 years.