AP Top News at 8:59 a.m. EST

Senate talks fall short, shutdown extends into workweek
WASHINGTON (AP) - The government shutdown is set to sow more disruption and political peril Monday after the Senate inched closer but ultimately fell short of an agreement that would have reopened federal agencies before the beginning of the workweek. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said negotiations kept going late into the night, with a vote to break a Democratic filibuster on a short-term funding bill scheduled for noon Monday. Under the proposal taking shape, Democrats would agree to a three-week spending measure - until Feb. 8 - in return for a commitment from the Republican leadership in the Senate to address immigration policy and other pressing legislative matters in the coming weeks.


Schumer's moment: Shutdown puts spotlight on Dem leader
WASHINGTON (AP) - For Republicans, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is the face of the government shutdown. For immigration advocates, he's their best hope. Perhaps the most powerful Democrat in Washington, Schumer has so far succeeded in keeping his party unified in a bid to use the government funding fight to push for protections for some 700,000 young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children. But he has little margin for error in this first major test of his muscle and maneuvering as leader. The pragmatist is balancing the demands of a liberal base eager for a fight with President Donald Trump and the political realities of red-state senators anxious about their re-election prospects this fall.


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. SENATE VOTE MAY TEMPORARILY END GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN Democrats could agree to a three-week spending measure, until Feb. 8, in return for a Republican commitment to address immigration policy and other pressing issues 2. WHERE VICE PRESIDENT PENCE IS VISITING Pence kicked off his visit to Israel with a meeting with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in which he said it was an honor to be in "Israel's capital, Jerusalem." 3. A NEW VOLATILE FRONTLINE IN THE SYRIAN WAR Fierce clashes are ongoing as Syria's Kurdish militia says it's repelled Turkish troops from villages seized in Ankara's offensive against the Afrin enclave.


Watch Top News Video




Turkish troops face fierce battles in Syrian Kurdish enclave
HASSA, Turkey (AP) - Intense clashes erupted Monday as Turkish troops and their allies advanced on a Kurdish enclave in Syria, the third day of the Ankara offensive aimed at ousting the U.S.-backed Kurdish militia from the area, the militia and a war monitoring group said. The Turkish offensive on Afrin, codenamed Operation Olive Branch, started on Saturday, heightening tensions in the already complicated Syrian conflict and threatening to further strain ties between NATO allies Turkey and the United States. Turkey says it aims to create a 30-kilometer (20-mile) deep "secure zone" in Afrin, the Kurdish-controlled enclave that straddles its borders.


Pence tells Israel US Embassy to move to Jerusalem in 2019
JERUSALEM (AP) - Vice President Mike Pence on Monday told Israel's parliament that the U.S. Embassy will be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem by the end of 2019, ahead of schedule, receiving a rousing ovation as he pledged to barrel ahead with a plan that has set off weeks of unrest and thrown U.S. peace efforts into disarray. The move, in the first ever address of a sitting American vice president to the Israeli Knesset, marked the highlight of Pence's three-day visit to Israel celebrating President Donald Trump's decision last month to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital. "The United States has chosen fact over fiction - and fact is the only true foundation for a just and lasting peace," Pence said.


Doctor who aided hunt for bin Laden languishes, forgotten
PESHAWAR, Pakistan (AP) - Shakil Afridi has languished in jail for years - since 2011, when the Pakistani doctor used a vaccination scam in an attempt to identify Osama bin Laden's home, aiding U.S. Navy Seals who tracked and killed the al-Qaida leader. Americans might wonder how Pakistan could imprison a man who helped track down the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. Pakistanis are apt to ask a different question: how could the United States betray its trust and cheapen its sovereignty with a secret nighttime raid that shamed the military and its intelligence agencies? "The Shakil Afridi saga is the perfect metaphor for U.S-Pakistan relations" - a growing tangle of mistrust and miscommunication that threatens to jeopardize key efforts against terrorism, said Michael Kugelman, Asia program deputy director at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington.


No quarter a given: Djokovic, Thiem out; Chung, Sandgren in
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) - Six-time champion Novak Djokovic was stunned in straight sets by Hyeon Chung not long after Tennys Sandgren upset No. 5 Dominic Thiem at the Australian Open. The season-opening major often throws up unexpected results, but the back-to-back upsets Monday resulted in a longshot of a quarterfinal: Chung, the first Korean to reach the last eight at a Grand Slam, vs. Sandgren, the American who had never won a Grand Slam match or beaten a top 10 player until last week. The 58th-ranked Chung relentlessly attacked Djokovic - who is playing his first tournament since Wimbledon because of an injured right elbow - in the 7-6 (4), 7-5, 7-6 (3) fourth-round win.


Rohingya Muslim refugee return to Myanmar likely delayed
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) - The gradual repatriation of more than 680,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees back to Myanmar from Bangladesh, scheduled to begin Tuesday, has been delayed amid widespread fears that they are being forced to return, Bangladesh said Monday. There was no immediate confirmation from Myanmar. The refugees began pouring across the border into Bangladesh in August, fleeing waves of attacks by Myanmar security forces and Buddhist mobs. While the two countries have signed an agreement to begin sending people home in "safety, security and dignity," the process has been chaotic and opaque, leaving international aid workers and many Rohingya afraid they would be coerced into going back to villages that they fled only months ago.


With a lighter touch, SAG Awards follows a familiar script
LOS ANGELES (AP) - With a still undetermined awards race and an industry undergoing tectonic shifts with the Me Too and Time's Up movements, awards shows have become canaries in the coal mine. After the Golden Globes, it was clear that the entertainment business was not shying away from its problems, but the Screen Actors Guild Awards suggested that perhaps the Hollywood reckoning is now following a familiar script. There were big moments Sunday at the 24th annual celebration of actors, like Harvey Weinstein accusers Marisa Tomei and Rosanna Arquette naming some of the key silence breakers who lit the fuse to the movement, and big questions about what would happen if the recently accused James Franco and Aziz Ansari won in their categories (they didn't).


'Executed' North Korean pop diva takes Olympic spotlight
PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) - Just a few years ago, she was reportedly executed by a North Korean firing squad. Now, Pyongyang's top pop diva is a senior ruling party official and a surprise headliner in the run-up to the South Korean Winter Olympics. Hyon Song Wol, the photogenic leader of Kim Jong Un's hand-picked Moranbong Band, has made two excursions across the Demilitarized Zone as a negotiator and advance team leader working out the details of Kim's surprise offer for the North to participate in the Pyeongchang Games. South Korea's media have been treating her like a true K-pop celebrity.