AP News: HOME | US | WORLD | BUSINESS | FINANCE | TECHNOLOGY | SPORTS |
ENTERTAINMENT | HEALTH | SCIENCE | WASHINGTON | STRANGE
Search AP News:

AP Top News at 4:41 p.m. EDT

The Latest: Clinton: Wasserman Schultz to have campaign role
Hillary Clinton is thanking her "longtime friend" Debbie Wasserman Schultz after the Florida congresswoman's decision to step down as chair of the Democratic National Committee. Clinton says that Wasserman Schultz will serve as honorary chair of her campaign's 50-state program to help elect Democrats around the country. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee says she looks forward to campaigning with Wasserman Schultz in Florida "and helping her re-election bid." Clinton responded after Wasserman Schultz agreed to step down as chair at the end of this week's Democratic National Convention. The move came after the publication last week of some 19,000 hacked emails, some of which suggested the DNC was favoring Clinton during the primary season.


Hacked emails complicate Democratic National Convention
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - On the heels of a tumultuous Republican convention, Hillary Clinton hopes her gathering in Philadelphia will show off a forward-looking Democratic Party united behind her steady leadership. But to do that, she must overcome lingering bitterness among supporters of defeated rival Bernie Sanders and a political mess and last-minute leadership shake-up of the party's own making. The Democratic National Convention was set to kick off Monday as a week of optimistic celebration with high-powered elected officials and celebrities re-introducing Clinton to a general election audience. But the effort was complicated by the publication of 19,000 hacked emails on the website Wikileaks, suggesting the Democratic National Committee had played favorites for Clinton during the primary.


The Latest: Marathon record holder criticizes IOC decision
World marathon record holder Paula Radcliffe has accused Olympic leaders of weakness in the fight against doping and not doing enough to protect clean athletes. Radcliffe says it is "unfair" of the International Olympic Committee to leave it to individual sports to decide whether or not Russians should be allowed to compete in Rio de Janeiro. "A truly strong message for clean sport would have been to ban all those who have been caught cheating," Radcliffe said in a statement posted on Twitter. "In short, it does not send the clear message it could have done that doping and cheating in all Olympic sport will never be tolerated." The Briton called the Olympic body's ruling a "sad day for clean sport.


Watch Top News Video




Analysis: Russia stays, and clean athletes scratch heads
If this turns out to be Thomas Bach's defining moment, here's what the leader of the International Olympic Committee will be remembered for: keeping Russia as part of the club, but losing the trust of thousands of athletes who thought that, maybe this year, they'd get the answers they've been looking for. In a way, the IOC and its president may have saved the Games As We Know Them, with their decision Sunday not to ban the entire Russian team from the Rio de Janeiro Games. No less than Russian President Vladimir Putin was making references to the potential fracturing of the Olympic movement if his country was kicked out completely.


Afghanistan marks day of national mourning after huge attack
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - Afghanistan marked a national day of mourning on Sunday, a day after a suicide bomber killed at least 80 people who were taking part in a peaceful demonstration in Kabul. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State group. Authorities say another 231 people were wounded, some seriously, in the bombing Saturday afternoon on a march by members of the ethnic Hazara community, who are predominantly Shiite Muslim. Most Afghans are Sunni, and the IS group regards Shiites as apostates. The attack was the first by IS on Kabul - and the capital's worst since a vicious Taliban insurgency began 15 years ago - raising concerns about the group's reach and capability in Afghanistan.


After Obama's green light, Afghan forces on the offensive
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - After two years of heavy casualties, the Afghan military is trying to retake the initiative in the war against militants with a new offensive against Islamic State group loyalists, an assault that will see American troops back on the battlefield working more closely with Afghan soldiers. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani recently announced a major assault against fighters loyal to the Islamic State group, who over the past year captured positions along Afghanistan's eastern border with Pakistan, mainly in Nangarhar province. That goal to uproot IS from Afghanistan has taken on new urgency in the wake of a deadly suicide bombing of a protest march Saturday in Kabul that killed at least 80 people.


Munich shooter was bullied loner, planned attack for a year
MUNICH (AP) - The teenager behind the deadly shooting rampage in Munich was a withdrawn loner obsessed with playing "killer" video games in his bedroom, a victim of bullying who suffered from panic attacks set off by contacts with other people, investigators said Sunday, adding that he had planned the attack for a year. Law enforcement officials piecing together a portrait of the 18-year-old shooter said he was seeing a doctor up to last month for treatment of depression and psychiatric problems that began in 2015 with inpatient hospital care and then was followed up with outpatient visits. They said medication for his problems had been found his room.


Turkish opposition party denounces coup attempt
ISTANBUL (AP) - Tens of thousands of supporters of Turkey's main opposition group, joined by some ruling party members, rallied Sunday in Istanbul to denounce a July 15 coup attempt, a rare show of unity that belies opposition unease over President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's crackdown since the failed uprising. The flag-waving demonstrators in the city's Taksim square reflected widespread rejection of the coup attempt in a NATO country that has endured several coups in past decades. Even so, these are tense times in Turkey, which has declared a three-month state of emergency and detained more than 13,000 people in the military, judiciary and other institutions.


Dancing, drugs, extremism _ multiple lives of Nice attacker
PARIS (AP) - A 31-year-old father of three obsessed with fitness and sex, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel led multiple lives. His darkest side appears to have been his best-kept secret: a calculated, committed jihadi ready to kill scores of people in a French Riviera rampage. Information emerging from authorities and people who knew him suggests Bouhlel concealed his different worlds from each other, and may have been following Islamic State guidance to blend in and hide his radicalism while he plotted violence. There was his family life - three children under 6, including an 18-month-old born just after his wife split with Bouhlel, accusing him of frequent abuse.


2 years after Ferguson, recriminations roil governor's race
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - It has been two years since a white police officer fatally shot black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, touching off days of rioting, but the political repercussions from the incident have only intensified, fanned by a governor's race in which all four Republican candidates are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach. Their TV ads show images of angry protesters and burning buildings and vehicles. They denounce "lawlessness" and "chaos" while promising to "secure our streets" and "enforce the law." Absent from the ads is any reference to community complaints after the Brown shooting that police discriminate against black residents.