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AP Top News at 2:32 a.m. EDT

The Latest: Israeli troops raid home of Palestinian attacker
A relative says Israeli troops have arrested the brother of a 20-year-old Palestinian who stabbed to death three members of an Israeli family. The assailant, identified as Omar al-Abed, 20, had sneaked over the fence of the Israeli settlement of Halamish in the West Bank late Friday and infiltrated the family's home, surprising them during a Sabbath dinner. The army says the attacker killed a man and two of his children, while a woman was wounded. Al-Abed is hospitalized in Israel after being shot. Ibrahim al-Abed, an uncle, says troops searched the family home in the village of Kobar on Saturday and arrested al-Abed's brother Monir, 21.


Spicer exits as Trump shakes up his beleaguered press team
WASHINGTON (AP) - White House press secretary Sean Spicer abruptly resigned Friday over President Donald Trump's decision to tap a camera-ready financier to lead the beleaguered White House communications team. The departing spokesman said the president "could benefit from a clean slate" as he seeks to steady operations amid the Russia investigations and ahead of a health care showdown. Spicer, whose daily briefings once dominated cable television and delighted late-night comics, quit in protest over the hiring of Anthony Scaramucci as the new White House communications director. Spicer denounced what he considered Scaramucci's lack of qualifications, according to people familiar with the situation who were not authorized to speak publicly about it.


6 killed as tensions over shrine turn violent in Israel
JERUSALEM (AP) - Three Palestinians were killed in street clashes in Jerusalem and three Israelis died in a stabbing attack at a West Bank settlement as tensions turned into violence over the Holy Land's most contested shrine. A Palestinian sneaked into a home in the Israeli settlement of Halamish in the West Bank after nightfall on Friday and stabbed to death three Israelis, the military said. The attacker apparently jumped over the fence and infiltrated the family's home, surprising them as they ate the traditional Sabbath evening meal. It said the Palestinian killed a man and two of his children, while a woman was wounded and taken to a hospital.


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Abortion fight rages in Kentucky, which has just 1 clinic
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Both sides in the abortion fight raging in Kentucky agree on one thing: The stakes are as high as ever in a state that could become the first in the nation without an abortion clinic. Political pressure has intensified since the Kentucky GOP took control of state government and moved quickly to pass new restrictions on abortions. And Republican Gov. Matt Bevin makes no apologies for waging a licensing fight against a Louisville clinic that is the last remaining facility performing abortions in the state. Another battle-tested participant joins the fight this weekend. Operation Save America, a Christian fundamentalist group, plans to mobilize hundreds of activists to protest against EMW Women's Surgical Center.


Mexico murders up with deadliest month in at least 20 years
MEXICO CITY (AP) - Mexico's spiraling violence reached new heights with 2,234 murders in June, the country's deadliest month in at least 20 years, according to government data. Killings rose in states ranging from the tourist haven of Baja California Sur to the Gulf coast state of Veracruz and even in Mexico City, long considered a relative oasis from drug gang violence. For the first six months of 2017, authorities nationwide recorded 12,155 homicide investigations, or 31 percent more than the 9,300 during the same period last year. Just Friday, the same day the report was released, a marine and four other people were killed when armed forces moved against the leader of the principal fuel-theft ring in the central state of Puebla.


Minneapolis shooting brings unwelcome attention to Somalis
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - The killing of an unarmed Australian woman by a Minneapolis police officer who is a Somali-American has turned an unwelcome spotlight on the city's beleaguered Somali community, where many again find themselves on the defensive. The city's police chief said Officer Mohamed Noor's race and ethnicity had nothing to do with the July 15 killing of Justine Damond, who was shot after she called 911 to report a possible rape. But negative comments have included former U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann's recent statement that Noor was an "affirmative-action hire by the hijab-wearing mayor of Minneapolis" - an apparent reference to the fact that Mayor Betsy Hodges has worn a head scarf when meeting with leaders of the city's Somali-American community.


Sean Spicer unlikely to disappear from television
NEW YORK (AP) - He won't be behind a podium at the White House, but it's unlikely Sean Spicer will disappear from television. Spicer quit as White House press secretary Friday, ushered out with the wish that "I hope he goes on to make a tremendous amount of money" from Anthony Scaramucci, President Donald Trump's new communications director. That's often the case in the communications business, where service in the high-pressure crucible of the White House is prized. Jay Carney, a press secretary in former President Barack Obama's administration, now works for Amazon. Spicer's voice would be valued at a television network, although the polarizing nature of the Trump White House may limit his options.


Police: Errant US bombing kills 12 Afghan security forces
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - An errant U.S. airstrike confirmed by the Pentagon killed 12 Afghan National Police officers and wounded two others, Helmand provincial police chief Abdul Ghafar Safi said Saturday. The death toll in Friday's airstrike was determined after a site inspection of the compound in the Gereshk district, he said. The United States in a statement confirmed that the airstrike on the Security Forces compound happened during a U.S.-supported operation against Taliban insurgents in the area. In the statement the U.S. offered its condolences to the families of the security forces who were killed. While much of Helmand province is under the control of Taliban, Afghan national security forces have been waging fierce battles to retake territory.


O.J. Simpson will get his freedom, but then what?
LOVELOCK, Nev. (AP) - When O.J. Simpson gets out of prison in October for his first taste of freedom in nine years, he will have the mementos he was convicted of stealing in a Las Vegas heist, his guaranteed NFL pension and, with any luck, certain life skills he says he acquired behind bars. Beyond that, the 70-year-old sports legend faces an uncertain future. "The legitimate mainstream business opportunities for Juice in the megabuck world of professional sports are slim and none," said John Vrooman, an economics professor and sports industry expert at Vanderbilt University. "If Americans love anyone more than a superhero, it is a fallen hero making a comeback against the odds," he said a day after Simpson was granted parole.


In Senate, ailing lawmakers given plenty of time to recover
WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen. John McCain's treatment for brain cancer could keep him out of Washington for weeks, perhaps months, and yet it's unlikely anyone will challenge his extended leave. Congress has a long tradition in which no one questions ailing lawmakers taking time to recover. For starters, it's just poor form. And, frankly, it's up to the stricken member of Congress and their doctors to decide when - or even if - they return to work. Some have recuperated away from the Capitol for a year or more. It's an unwritten courtesy that often doesn't extend to the real working world where employees are forced to file for medical disability or take unpaid leave.

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