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AP Top News at 10:17 p.m. EDT

5 dead in vehicle, knife attack at British Parliament
LONDON (AP) - A knife-wielding man went on a deadly rampage in the heart of Britain's seat of power Wednesday, plowing a car into pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer to death inside the gates of Parliament. Five people were killed, including the assailant, and 40 others were injured in what Prime Minister Theresa May condemned as a "sick and depraved terrorist attack." Lawmakers, lords, staff and visitors were locked down after the man was shot by police within the perimeter of Parliament, just yards (meters) from entrances to the building itself and in the shadow of the iconic Big Ben clock tower.


AP Exclusive: Before Trump job, Manafort worked to aid Putin
WASHINGTON (AP) - Before signing up with Donald Trump, former campaign manager Paul Manafort secretly worked for a Russian billionaire with a plan to "greatly benefit the Putin Government," The Associated Press has learned. The White House attempted to brush the report aside Wednesday, but it quickly raised fresh alarms in Congress about Russian links to Trump associates. Manafort proposed in a confidential strategy plan as early as June 2005 that he would influence politics, business dealings and news coverage inside the United States, Europe and former Soviet republics to benefit President Vladimir Putin's government, even as U.S.-Russia relations under Republican President George W.


10 Things to Know for Thursday
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Thursday: 1. KNIFE-WIELDING MAN LAUNCHES ATTACK IN LONDON Five are killed, including the assailant, after he plows a car into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, then stabs a police officer to death inside the gates of Parliament. 2. WHY TRUMP FEELS 'SOMEWHAT VINDICATED' ON WIRETAP CLAIM Private communications of the president and his transition team may have been scooped up by U.S. intelligence officials monitoring other targets, a leading lawmaker says. 3. HEALTH CARE OVERHAUL IN PERIL Trump dangles possible changes aimed at placating conservatives threatening to torpedo the bill.


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Spying claim by Intel chair renews fight over Russia probe
WASHINGTON (AP) - Private communications of Donald Trump and his presidential transition team may have been scooped up by American intelligence officials monitoring other targets and improperly distributed throughout spy agencies, the chairman of the House intelligence committee said Wednesday - an extraordinary public airing of often-secret information that brought swift protests from Democrats. Republican Rep. Devin Nunes' comments led the committee's ranking Democrat, Adam Schiff, to renew his party's calls for an independent probe of Trump campaign links to Russia in addition to the GOP-led panel's investigation. Schiff also said he had seen "more than circumstantial evidence" that Trump associates colluded with Russia.


Gorsuch to Democrats: No return to 'horse and buggy' era
WASHINGTON (AP) - Assured of support from majority Republicans, Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch wrapped up two days of Senate questioning Wednesday to glowing GOP reviews but complaints from frustrated Democrats that he concealed his views from the American public. Gorsuch, a federal appeals court judge in Denver, refused repeated attempts to get him to talk about key legal and political issues of the day. But he did tell Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who worried that Gorsuch would vote to restrict abortion, that "no one is looking to return us to horse and buggy days." The Supreme Court itself threw one surprise Gorsuch's way when it ruled unanimously Wednesday in a case involving learning-disabled students, overturning a standard for special education that Gorsuch had endorsed in an earlier case on the same topic.


Facebook rape stirs questions about witnessing crimes online
CHICAGO (AP) - The case of a 15-year-old Chicago girl who authorities say was raped while around 40 people watched on Facebook raises questions that have come up before in other attacks: What's the obligation of bystanders who see a crime unfolding? And why do they not intervene? None of those who watched the sexual assault involving five or six men or boys called police. The girl knows at least one of her attackers, and investigators reported making good progress toward identifying the others. A closer look at what laws in the United States say about people who witness crimes: --- THE LAW IN GENERAL There is no all-encompassing legal obligation in the United States that a bystander who sees an act of violence must intervene or call police.


Leaders need votes for health bill on eve of House showdown
WASHINGTON (AP) - The top Republican legislative priority in peril, President Donald Trump dangled possible changes to the health care bill Wednesday aimed at placating conservatives threatening to torpedo the legislation. The White House seemed to make progress after GOP opposition had snowballed a day before a showdown House vote. Trump huddled at the White House with 18 lawmakers, a mix of supporters and opponents, Vice President Mike Pence saw around two dozen and House GOP leaders held countless talks with lawmakers at the Capitol. The sessions came as leaders rummaged for votes on a roll call they can ill-afford to lose without diminishing their clout for the rest of the GOP agenda.


Police: White sword killer went to NY to attack black people
NEW YORK (AP) - A white U.S. Army veteran from Baltimore bent on making a racist attack took a bus to New York, the "media capital of the world," randomly picked out a black man who was collecting bottles on the street and killed him with a sword, police said Wednesday. James Harris Jackson turned himself in at a Times Square police station early Wednesday, about 25 hours after Timothy Caughman staggered into a police precinct bleeding to death. "I'm the person that you're looking for," Jackson told police, according to Assistant Chief William Aubrey. Jackson, who was arrested on suspicion of murder, told police he'd harbored feelings of hatred toward black men for at least 10 years, authorities said.


LAPD: Latinos report fewer sex crimes amid immigration fears
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The police chief of Los Angeles, a city that is half Latino, found himself in the middle of the national immigration debate on Wednesday after saying there's a correlation between the Trump administration's call for stiffer immigration policies and a drop in the number of Hispanics reporting sexual abuse and domestic violence. "Imagine your sister, your mother, not reporting a sexual assault for fear that their family will be torn apart," LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said Tuesday. Since the beginning of this year, sexual assaults reported by Latinos in Los Angeles have dropped 25 percent, and domestic violence reports by Latinos have decreased by 10 percent compared to the same period last year.


Serial numbers, game photos may help verify Brady jerseys
BOSTON (AP) - Now that authorities believe they have recovered the jersey stolen from Tom Brady's locker following the Patriots' Super Bowl win last month, the next step will be determining whether it is in fact the MVP quarterback's missing grass-stained garment. So how exactly does that happen? Old-fashioned detective work. Experts in the sports memorabilia industry, including one that has worked directly with NFL teams, say it is a tedious process that involves comparing photos and videos that captured degradation to the jersey during the game. They also compare the jersey to team-issued serial numbers and other player-specific customizations that authentic jerseys typically have.