AP Top News at 5:57 p.m. EST

Shutdown deadline nears; no accord in Trump-Schumer meeting
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer met Friday afternoon in an eleventh-hour effort to avert a government shutdown, with a bitterly divided Washington locked in stare-down over federal spending and legislation to protect some 700,000 younger immigrants from deportation. The two New Yorkers, who pride themselves on their deal-making abilities, emerged from the meeting at the White House without an agreement, and Republicans and Democrats in Congress continued to trade blame as the midnight deadline approached. "We made some progress, but we still have a good number of disagreements," Schumer told reporters upon returning to Capitol Hill.


Las Vegas gunman carefully planned attack; motive is mystery
LAS VEGAS (AP) - The Las Vegas gunman meticulously planned how to carry out the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, researching SWAT tactics, renting other hotel rooms overlooking outdoor concerts and investigating potential targets in at least four cities, authorities said Friday. But almost four months after Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and wounded more than 800 others with a barrage of bullets from the Mandalay Bay casino-hotel, investigators still have not answered the key question: Why did he do it? Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo released a preliminary report on the Oct. 1 attack and said he did not expect criminal charges to be filed against Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, who had been called a person of interest in the case.


Supreme Court to rule on Trump travel ban
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide the legality of the latest version of President Donald Trump's ban on travel to the United States by residents of six majority-Muslim countries. The issue pits an administration that considers the restrictions necessary for Americans' security against challengers who claim it is illegally aimed at Muslims and stems from Trump's campaign call for a "complete shutdown of Muslims" entering the U.S. The justices plan to hear argument in April and issue a final ruling by late June on a Trump policy that has been repeatedly blocked and struck down in the lower courts.


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Crunch time: What Amazon wants for its new HQ
WASHINGTON (AP) - Just 20 cities are left standing in the competition for Amazon's second headquarters and the 50,000 jobs it will bring. Now comes the hard part for the finalists - and for Amazon. Based on the cities that made the cut, and what the company told some of the cities that didn't, the company will likely scrutinize six key criteria when making its final call. It plans to announce its decision later this year. The 20 cities include Austin, Texas; Atlanta; Boston; New York City; Washington, D.C.; Los Angeles; and Nashville, Tennessee. Here's what's important: - TALENT, TALENT, TALENT Among all of Amazon's needs, high-skilled workers are at the top of the list.


Mom, wife who had 2nd online life found slain
CALERA, Ala. (AP) - Kathleen Dawn West described herself as a full-time wife and mom on Facebook but lived another life on other social media platforms, calling herself an exhibitionist and posting risque photos with a chance for subscribers to see sexier images for $15.99 a month. West, 42, was found dead outside her home near Birmingham, and authorities are now faced with a question: Did West's online activities play a role in her death? Police have classified West's death as a homicide, but they haven't said how she died. What appears to be the remainder of a blood stain darkens the asphalt across the street from the two-story brick home she shared with her husband and middle school-age daughter.


Mattis says US competitive warfighting edge has eroded
WASHINGTON (AP) - Countering China's rapidly expanding military and an increasingly aggressive Russia are now the U.S. military's top national security priorities, outpacing the threat of terrorism, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Friday. He said competition with those adversaries has threatened America's military advantage around the world. Laying out a broad new strategy for the Defense Department, Mattis warned that all aspects of the military's competitive warfighting edge have eroded. He said building a force that can deter war with established and emerging military powers in Moscow and Beijing, and U.S. enemies such as North Korea and Iran will require increased investment to make the military more lethal, agile and ready to fight.


Olympic gymnast abused by ex-doctor wants him to suffer
LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman on Friday confronted her former doctor who has pleaded guilty to multiple sexual assaults, warning him that the testimony of the "powerful army" of 140 survivors at his sentencing will haunt him in prison. Roughly 80 of the women and girls whom Larry Nassar abused under the guise of medical treatment have stood before the court during a marathon sentencing hearing that began Tuesday, describing with eloquence and sometimes tears the harm Nassar did and the impact he has had on their lives. "You have not taken gymnastics away from me," Raisman said.


'Watching my family burn': Woman frantic after copter crash
RATON, N.M. (AP) - Andra Cobb was frantic when she called for help, telling an emergency operator that a helicopter she was riding in with her father, longtime partner and others had crashed in a remote part of New Mexico and that she was watching her "family burn." Police released 911 recordings Friday from the crash near the Colorado-New Mexico line that killed five people, including Zimbabwean opposition leader Roy Bennett, and his wife, Heather. Cobb, 39, was the sole survivor, escaping with broken bones before the helicopter burst into flames. Her father, Paul Cobb, the co-pilot, and her longtime partner, Charles Burnett III, a Texas-based investor who owned the ranch where the group of friends was headed, also were killed in the crash Wednesday, along with pilot Jamie Coleman Dodd.


Congestion pricing: Driving in Manhattan could cost $11.52
NEW YORK (AP) - A proposal to charge motorists nearly $12 to drive into the busiest parts of Manhattan provoked protests and complaints even before it was released Friday, though there are signs the idea of congestion pricing is quietly gaining momentum in the nation's largest city. London, Stockholm and Singapore already have congestion surcharges. But calls to impose similar tolls in New York as a way to address gridlock while raising funds for public transportation have been rejected in the past over concerns about the cost to middle-class and poor commuters. On Friday even some past critics of congestion pricing said the ideas hold promise for addressing gridlock while raising funds for the city's beleaguered subway system.