AP Top News at 8:47 a.m. EDT

Red Sox owner wants to rename Yawkey Way for David Ortiz
BOSTON (AP) - The Boston Red Sox will ask the city to rename Yawkey Way, the street alongside Fenway Park, to change what owner John Henry called a haunting reminder of the ballclub's history of racial intolerance. Henry told the Boston Herald on Thursday that he welcomes changing the name of the street that honors his predecessor Tom Yawkey, an inductee in the baseball Hall of Fame. It's also the mailing address for the ballpark and team offices. Under Yawkey, who owned the club from 1933-76, the Red Sox were the last team in the major leagues to cross the color barrier in 1959.


Spain manhunt deepens as Barcelona insists 'I am not afraid'
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) - Police shot and killed five people wearing fake bomb belts who staged a deadly car attack in a seaside resort in Spain's Catalonia region Friday, just hours after a van plowed into pedestrians on a busy Barcelona promenade. Spanish authorities said the back-to-back vehicle attacks - as well as an explosion earlier this week in a house elsewhere in Catalonia - were related and the work of a large terrorist group. Three people were arrested, but a manhunt was underway for the driver of the van used in Thursday's Barcelona attack, which killed 13 people and injured 100 others.


The Latest: Spain leader says terror Europe's main problem
Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy says the fight against terrorism is a "global battle" and Europe's main problem after two attacks in Catalonia that killed 14 people. Rajoy also thanked the emergency services for their work and messages of support from around the world after the van attack in Barcelona killed 13 people, and subsequent violence in the seaside resort of Cambrils that killed one woman. Rajoy was speaking at a joint news conference in Barcelona with Catalan regional president Carles Puigdemont.


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Crowds returning to Las Ramblas are subdued and pensive
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) - Tourists and Barcelona residents tentatively returned to Las Ramblas on Friday morning for a subdued stroll down the leafy boulevard, a day after a van attack filled it with fear and bloodshed. Dozens of armed police officers in blue and neon-yellow uniforms were stationed near Placa de Catalunya and the street was still closed to vehicles, but all other signs of the previous day's terror had been cleared away. Newsstands were open selling papers and souvenirs, and by midmorning, some ice cream shops were starting to lift their gates. Notably still closed were the iconic flower stalls near where the van came to a halt after killing at least 13 and injuring 100.


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. MANHUNT ON FOR DRIVER IN BARCELONA ATTACK Spain's second largest city is reeling after a van plows into pedestrians in a terror attack that kills at least 13 people and injures over 100. 2. TRUMP DECRIES CRITICS OF HIS COMMENTS ON RACIAL VIOLENCE The president finds himself under siege while fanning the controversy over race and politics toward a full-fledged national conflagration. 3. WHAT'S GROWING ALONGSIDE NORTH KOREA'S NUCLEAR PROGRAM Economic markets blossom and a consumer culture takes root in the isolated country.


Trump defends Confederate statues, berates his critics
BRIDGEWATER, N.J. (AP) - With prominent Republicans openly questioning his competence and moral leadership, President Donald Trump burrowed deeper into the racially charged debate over Confederate memorials and lashed out at members of his own party in the latest controversy to engulf his presidency. Out of sight, but still online, Trump tweeted his defense of monuments to Confederate icons - bemoaning rising efforts to remove them as an attack on America's "history and culture." And he berated his critics who, with increasingly sharper language, have denounced his initially slow and then ultimately combative comments on the racial violence at a white supremacist rally last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia.


Colleges brace for more violence amid rash of hate on campus
BOSTON (AP) - Nicholas Fuentes is dropping out of Boston University and heading south, pressing ahead with his right-wing politics despite receiving online death threats. The 19-year-old joined a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend and posted a defiant Facebook message promising that a "tidal wave of white identity is coming," less than an hour after a car plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters. Now, he's hoping to transfer to Auburn University in Alabama. "I'm ready to return to my base, return to my roots, to rally the troops and see what I can do down there," Fuentes said in an interview this week.


Warship captain in collision that killed 7 to lose command
WASHINGTON (AP) - Poor seamanship and flaws in keeping watch contributed to a collision between a Navy destroyer and a commercial container ship that killed seven sailors, Navy officials said, announcing that the warship captain will be relieved of command and more than a dozen other sailors will be punished. Adm. William Moran, the vice chief of naval operations, told reporters Thursday that the top three leaders aboard the USS Fitzgerald, which was badly damaged in the June collision off the coast of Japan, will be removed from duty aboard the ship. They are the commanding officer, Cmdr. Bryce Benson; the executive officer, Cmdr.


NASA, PBS marking 40 years since Voyager spacecraft launches
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) - Forty years after blasting off, Earth's most distant ambassadors - the twin Voyager spacecraft - are carrying sounds and music of our planet ever deeper into the cosmos. Think of them as messages in bottles meant for anyone - or anything - out there. This Sunday marks the 40th anniversary of NASA's launch of Voyager 2, now almost 11 billion miles distant. It departed from Cape Canaveral on Aug. 20, 1977 to explore Jupiter and Saturn. Voyager 1 followed a few weeks later and is ahead of Voyager 2. It's humanity's farthest spacecraft at 13 billion miles away and is the world's only craft to reach interstellar space, the vast mostly emptiness between star systems.