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News from the Associated Press
AP Top News at 6:34 p.m. EDT

The Juice will be loose: O.J. Simpson granted parole
LOVELOCK, Nev. (AP) - O.J. Simpson was granted parole Thursday after more than eight years in prison for a Las Vegas hotel-room heist, successfully making his case for freedom in a nationally televised hearing that reflected America's enduring fascination with the former football star. Simpson, 70, could be released as early as Oct. 1. By then, he will have served the minimum of his nine-to-33-year sentence for a bungled attempt to snatch sports memorabilia he claimed had been stolen from him. During the more than hour-long hearing on live TV, Simpson was, by turns, remorseful, jovial and defensive, heatedly insisting the items taken in the armed robbery were "my stuff." At one point, the murder defendant in the 1995 "Trial of the Century" set off a storm of sarcasm and incredulity on social media when he said: "I've basically spent a conflict-free life, you know." All four parole commissioners who conducted the hearing voted for his release after a half-hour of deliberations.


Publicly assailed by Trump, Sessions says he's staying on
WASHINGTON (AP) - Attorney General Jeff Sessions, publicly skewered by his boss for stepping clear of the Russia-Trump investigations, declared Thursday he still loves his job and plans to stay on. Yet Donald Trump's airing of his long-simmering frustrations with Sessions raised significant new questions about the future of the nation's top prosecutor. The White House was quick to insist that the president "has confidence" in Sessions. However, the episode underscored how the attorney general's crime-fighting agenda is being overshadowed by his fractured relationship with Trump and the continuing investigations into allegations of Russian ties to the Republican candidate's presidential campaign.


Even with Trump warning, Mueller likely to probe finances
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's growing anxiety about the federal Russia probe has spilled into public view with his warning that special counsel Robert Mueller would be out of bounds if he dug into the Trump family's finances. But that's a line that Mueller seems sure to cross. Several of Trump's family members and close advisers have already become ensnared in the investigations, including son Donald Trump Jr. and son-in-law and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner. Probing the family's sprawling business ties would bring an investigation the president has called a partisan "witch hunt" even closer to the Oval Office.


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Analysis: Trump's Sessions remarks show penchant for shaming
WASHINGTON (AP) - The art of humiliation appears to be a key operating principle for President Donald Trump, and his remarks about Attorney General Jeff Sessions are the latest example of the ease with which the president is willing to air grievances about members of his team. Trump took on Sessions in an interview Wednesday with The New York Times, criticizing the former U.S. senator and early Trump campaign supporter for recusing himself from the FBI investigation into possible ties between Trump's campaign and Russia. Trump called Sessions' decision to step aside "very unfair to the president" and added that he would have chosen someone else to lead the Justice Department if he'd had any inkling that Sessions would take such a step.


US buildings, NFL stadium check panels amid fears of fire
In promotional brochures, a U.S. company boasted of the "stunning visual effect" its shimmering aluminum panels created in an NFL stadium, an Alaskan high school and a luxury hotel along Baltimore's Inner Harbor that "soars 33 stories into the air." Those same panels - Reynobond composite material with a polyethylene core - also were used in the Grenfell Tower apartment building in London. British authorities say they're investigating whether the panels helped spread the blaze that ripped across the building's outer walls, killing at least 80 people. The panels, also called cladding, accentuate a building's appearance and also improve energy efficiency.


GOP leaders plan Tuesday health vote, it's an uphill climb
WASHINGTON (AP) - Republican leaders pushed toward a Senate vote next Tuesday on resurrecting their nearly flat-lined health care bill. Their uphill drive was further complicated by the ailing GOP Sen. John McCain's potential absence and a dreary report envisioning that the number of uninsured Americans would soar. The White House and GOP leaders fished Thursday for ways to win over recalcitrant senators, including an administration proposal to let states use Medicaid funds to help people buy their own private health insurance. But there were no indications they'd ensured the votes needed to even start debating the party's legislative keystone, a bill scuttling and supplanting President Barack Obama's health care law.


Cancer isn't silencing McCain in career's latest chapter
WASHINGTON (AP) - John McCain couldn't bring himself to vote for Donald Trump - so he talked about writing in his best friend's name for president. After the election, he's been the leading Senate Republican critic of Trump's posture toward Russia. And from his Arizona home, where he's battling brain cancer, the Arizona senator on Thursday lobbed a new attack at the White House over its Syria policy. The grave medical diagnosis hit the six-term senator just as he was settling into the latest notable role in his storied career. The ex-prisoner of war, former GOP presidential nominee and onetime standard-bearer of the political Straight Talk Express has emerged as a voice for what some Republicans feel is a party lost in the Trump era.


In surrealist twist, Dali exhumed in paternity lawsuit
FIGUERES, Spain (AP) - Salvador Dali's eccentric artistic and personal history took yet another bizarre turn Thursday with the exhumation of his embalmed remains in order to find genetic samples that could settle whether one of the founding figures of surrealism fathered a girl decades ago. Pilar Abel, a 61-year-old tarot card reader, claims her mother had an affair with Dali while working as a domestic helper in the northeastern Spanish town of Figueres, where the artist was born and where he had moved back to with his Russian wife Gala. After two decades of court battles, a Madrid judge last month granted Abel a DNA test to find out whether her allegations are true.


Palestinians clash with Israel police at Jerusalem holy site
JERUSALEM (AP) - Palestinians clashed with Israeli security forces near a contested Jerusalem shrine after Muslim worshippers massed outside for evening prayers on Thursday as tensions over the holy site escalated further. Israel police spokeswoman Luba Samri said Palestinians hurled stones and glass bottles at officers after the prayers outside the site, referred to by Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and by Jews as the Temple Mount. The Palestinian Red Crescent said it treated at least 22 people for injuries. Police said no officers were injured; they had no information about injured protesters. The Palestinians were protesting Israel's placement of metal detectors at the entrance to the holy site after a deadly attack there last week in which three Israeli Arab gunmen killed two Israeli police officers before they were shot and killed at the entrance to the site.


For many African girls, menstruation means humiliation
WAKISO, Uganda (AP) - Some menstruating schoolgirls were locked in dormitories while their peers were in class. To avoid the humiliation, others stayed home. As more girls skipped class because they couldn't afford sanitary pads, authorities at a government-backed school outside Uganda's capital, Kampala, were forced to do what few have done: provide free sanitary pads. "We looked at the absenteeism rate and you would find that in a class if there are six people who are absent, at least four of them are girls. Some boldly came to us and said, 'When we are on our period there is no care, so that's why we prefer staying at home,'" said Vincent Odoi, a teacher at Wampewo Ntakke Secondary School.