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News from the Associated Press
AP Top News at 5:45 p.m. EST

From Shreveport to Seneca Falls, a march for female power
NEW YORK (AP) - People participating in marches in the United States and around the world walked in support of female empowerment and denounced President Donald Trump's views on immigration, abortion, LGBT rights and women's rights on the anniversary of his inauguration. Tens of thousands of them marched in cities up and down the West Coast. Actress Viola Davis addressed members of the Los Angeles crowd, many of whom carried signs like "Real news, fake president." In Park City, Utah, where the annual Sundance Film Festival is in full swing, actress Jane Fonda and nationally known attorney Gloria Allred joined the women's march.


GOP, Democrats show no sign of retreat on shutdown's 1st day
WASHINGTON (AP) - Republicans and Democrats showed no signs of ending their standoff over immigration and spending Saturday as Americans awoke to the first day of a government shutdown and Congress staged a weekend session to show voters it was trying to resolve the stalemate. The closure of many government agencies was a striking display of Washington dysfunction, played out on the anniversary of President Donald Trump's inauguration, and there was more finger-pointing than signs of bipartisan dealmaking. Trump made light of the debacle in a tweet that said Democrats "wanted to give me a nice present" to mark the start of his second year in office.


Signs of government shutdown spotty but symbolic
WASHINGTON (AP) - Symbols of American promise became emblems of American dysfunction on Saturday when a dispute in Congress over spending and immigration forced scores of federal government agencies and outposts to close their doors. The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island turned away visitors in New York, due to what the National Park Service described as "a lapse in appropriations," a bureaucratic term for a lack of money. In Philadelphia, crowds of tourists were told Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed, and the Liberty Bell were closed. The shuttered icons were some of the easiest-to-spot impacts of the partial government closure.


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Geysers yes, Ellis Island no: Some US parks open, some not
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) - Visitors could still ride snowmobiles and ski into Yellowstone National Park Saturday to marvel at the geysers and buffalo herds, despite the federal government shutdown. But across the country in New York, the nation's most famous monuments to immigration - the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island - were closed. The Interior Department had vowed to keep open as many parks, monuments and public lands as possible during the shutdown, which began at midnight Friday on the East Coast. By mid-day Saturday, the pattern was spotty, and some visitors were frustrated. "My initial reaction is, they really kind of screwed up our day.


Missouri governor: 'no blackmail,' 'no violence' in affair
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - In his first interview since acknowledging an extramarital affair, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens said Saturday that there was "no blackmail" and "no threat of violence" by him in what he described as a months-long "consensual relationship" with his former hairdresser. Greitens told The Associated Press that he has no plans to resign from office as a result of the affair, despite calls to step aside from several Republican and Democratic state lawmakers. "I'm staying. I'm staying," he said twice for emphasis, adding about his relationship with his wife, staff and supporters: "We're strong." Greitens, 43, has remained out of the public eye since shortly after delivering his State of the State address on Jan.


AP FACT CHECK: Trump disdained jobless rate, now loves it
WASHINGTON (AP) - Donald Trump, the presidential candidate, would not like the way Trump, the president, is crowing about today's unemployment rate. He'd be calling the whole thing a "hoax." Trump raised a red flag about declining jobless numbers during his campaign, so as to deny President Barack Obama any credit. Trump noted that the jobless rate masks the true employment picture by leaving out the millions who have given up looking for work. But Trump is seeing red no more. The same stats he assailed in 2015 and 2016 now are his proof of "fantastic," ''terrific" economic progress, for which he wants the credit.


Mudslides take heavy toll on immigrants serving posh town
Oprah Winfrey and Rob Lowe give Montecito its star power, but it's people like Antonio and Victor Benitez who keep the wealthy Southern California community running. The Mexican brothers are gardeners and part of the town's working-class immigrant population, which suffered outsized losses from the recent mudslides that killed at least 20, injured dozens and damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes. Antonio and Victor Benitez suffered broken bones and each lost a child. Antonio's wife was killed, while Victor's wife is missing and his toddler son was injured. Nearly a third of those killed in the Jan. 9 mudslides were from immigrant families working in service jobs in the largely white and retired Pacific coast town of 9,000.


IOC says North Korea to have 22 athletes in 5 Olympic sports
LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) - A Korean unity deal for the Pyeongchang Olympics will bring 22 North Korean athletes across the border to South Korea, where they will march as one under a unification flag at the opening ceremony and compete together in one sport. In the most symbolic agreement approved Saturday, 12 North Korean women's hockey players will join their neighbors in a united roster playing in special uniforms with a Korean song as their anthem. North Koreans will also compete in figure skating, short track speed skating, Alpine skiing and cross-country skiing after being given exceptional late entries by the International Olympic Committee.


Trump's first year in office has been a can't-miss drama
WASHINGTON (AP) - A bleak description of "American carnage." A forceful rollback of his predecessor's achievements. A blatant falsehood from the White House podium. And that was just the first 24 hours. In his first year in office, Donald Trump proved to be a singular figure, casting aside norms and traditions, fighting with Republicans and Democrats alike and changing how the nation and the presidency are viewed at home and abroad. Seemingly each day spawned several can-you-believe-it headlines that would have defined a previous president's term. But in the hyper-accelerated Trump news cycle, many were forgotten by the next morning. Appropriate for a former reality TV star, Trump's first year was can't-miss drama, full of unforgettable characters, surprise casting changes and innumerable plot twists.