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News from the Associated Press
AP Top News at 7:25 a.m. EDT

Kim fires off insults at Trump and hints at weapons test
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has lobbed a string of insults at President Donald Trump, calling him a "mentally deranged U.S. dotard" and hinting at a frightening new weapon test. The fact that it's the first time for a North Korean leader to issue such a direct statement has raised the international nuclear standoff to a new level. Kim says in his Friday statement that Trump will "pay dearly" for his recent threat to destroy North Korea. Kim calls Trump "a rogue and a gangster fond of playing with fire." Kim's foreign minister later said North Korea may test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean to fulfill Kim's vow to take the "highest-level" action against the United States.


Trump piles on new economic sanctions against North Korea
NEW YORK (AP) - President Donald Trump has added economic action to his fiery military threats against North Korea, and renewed his rhetorical offensive against Kim Jong Un on Friday, calling the reclusive leader "obviously a madman." Trump's move to punish foreign companies that deal with the North was the latest salvo in a U.S.-led campaign to isolate and impoverish Kim's government until his country halts its missile and nuclear tests. Trump announced the measures Thursday as he met leaders from South Korea and Japan, the nations most immediately imperiled by North Korea's threats of a military strike. "North Korea's nuclear weapons and missile development is a grave threat to peace and security in our world and it is unacceptable that others financially support this criminal, rogue regime," Trump said as he joined Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in for lunch.


5 things to know about N. Korean leader's rebuke of Trump
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - On the surface it seems like more of the same: North Korea responds to another threat by U.S. President Donald Trump by calling him a "deranged" old man who will "pay dearly" for his insults. These words, however, carry the weight of an unprecedented personal rebuke from North Korea's supreme leader, Kim Jong Un. Behind Kim's colorful language released Friday is a remarkable window into the thinking - albeit filtered through state media - of the leader of a country that, despite opposition by the world's sole superpower, stands on the brink of nuclear weapons mastery.


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10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. NORTH KOREA'S LEADER CALLS TRUMP 'DERANGED' In an extraordinary and direct rebuke, Kim Jong Un said the U.S. president would "pay dearly" for his threats. Hours later, North Korea's foreign minister reportedly said that his country may be planning to test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean. 2. HOW SEARCH FOR MEXICO EARTHQUAKE VICTIM TURNED SHOCKING News media, officials and volunteer rescuers all repeated the story of "Frida Sofia" with a sense of urgency that made it a national drama, But she never existed, Mexican navy officials now say.


Puerto Rico faces weeks without electricity after Maria
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - The eye of Hurricane Maria was nearing the Turks and Caicos early Friday as Puerto Rico sought to recover from the storm's devastation. Two days after Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, flooding towns, crushing homes and killing at least two people, millions on the island faced the dispiriting prospect of weeks and perhaps months without electricity. The storm knocked out the entire grid across the U.S. territory of 3.4 million, leaving many without power. The loss of power left residents hunting for gas canisters for cooking, collecting rainwater or steeling themselves mentally for the hardships to come in the tropical heat.


Search for Mexico quake survivors enters day 4, some success
MEXICO CITY (AP) - Survivors are still being pulled from rubble in Mexico City as rescue operations stretch into a fourth day Friday, spurring hope among desperate relatives gathered at the sites of buildings collapsed by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake. Mexico's federal police said several people were lifted out of the debris of two buildings Thursday. Rescuers removed or broke through slabs until they found cracks that allowed workers to wiggle through to reach the victims, then lift them to safety. The city government said 60 people in all had been rescued since the quake hit at midday Tuesday. Still, with the hours passing, fewer of the living were being found, and the official death toll rose to 273 in Mexico City and several nearby states, with 137 in the capital.


Mexico shocked by news: Girl trapped in rubble didn't exist
MEXICO CITY (AP) - Hour after excruciating hour, Mexicans were transfixed by dramatic efforts to reach a young girl thought buried in the rubble of a school destroyed by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake. She reportedly wiggled her fingers, told rescuers her name and said there were others trapped near her. Rescue workers called for tubes, pipes and other tools to reach her. News media, officials and volunteer rescuers all repeated the story of "Frida Sofia" with a sense of urgency that made it a national drama, drawing attention away from other rescue efforts across the quake-stricken city and leaving people in Mexico and abroad glued to their television sets.


For Rohingya Muslim child refugees, too many losses to count
BALUKHALI REFUGEE CAMP, Bangladesh (AP) - Abdul Hamid has the wide-open smile of a child and the eyes of an adult. By age 12, the Rohingya Muslim boy has seen more than anyone should have to see in a lifetime. He saw his father shot by "Burma soldiers," he volunteers in a calm yet deeply unsettling tone, lifting two fingers of his right hand to illustrate the act. When his father didn't die right away, he saw the soldiers slash his throat. His mother fled their home in Myanmar with Hamid and four younger siblings. They hid in forests for days and then walked for two days to reach the safety of Bangladesh.


North Korean leader Kim called Trump a what? A 'dotard'
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - Famous for using bombastic, derogatory and often-awkward English slams against enemies, North Korean state media sent people scrambling for dictionaries Friday with a dispatch that quotes leader Kim Jong Un calling President Donald Trump "the mentally deranged U.S. dotard." The what? Dotard is a translation of a Korean word, "neukdari," which is a derogatory reference to an old person. It was used in an unusual direct statement from Kim that the Korean Central News Agency transmitted verbatim in response to Trump's speech at the U.N. this week, in which he mocked Kim as a "Rocket Man" on a "suicide mission," and said that if the U.S.


Uber to lose its license to operate in London
LONDON (AP) - London's transport authority said Friday it won't renew Uber's license to operate in the British capital, arguing that it demonstrates a lack of corporate responsibility with implications in public safety and security. Transport for London says the car-hailing app was not "fit and proper to hold a private hire operator license." Uber, whose app is used by 3.5 million passengers and 40,000 drivers in London, will see its current license expire on Sept. 30. The company promised it would appeal, and can continue to operate until the appeals process is exhausted. In its decision , Transport for London cited its approach to handling serious criminal offenses and how it conducts background checks on its drivers.