Member Login
The Daily Courier
 
News from the Associated Press
AP Top News at 10:36 a.m. EDT

The Latest: Sessions says travel ban is lawful, necessary
Attorney General Jeff Sessions is defending the Trump administration's travel ban as an important tool in fighting terrorism. Speaking Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee, he defended the legality of an executive order that seeks to block the travel to the U.S. of citizens of Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria and Yemen, as well as some Venezuelan government officials and their families. In his opening statement, Sessions says "the order is lawful, necessary, and we are proud to defend it." He says he is confident that the Justice Department will prevail in its effort to defend and enforce the ban.


Democratic senators to press Sessions on talks with Trump
WASHINGTON (AP) - Democratic senators plan to press Attorney General Jeff Sessions about his private communications with the president when he appears before a Senate committee Wednesday to discuss his leadership of the Justice Department. The routine oversight hearing is Sessions' first appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee since his January confirmation, and it comes as has worked quickly to reshape the department with an intense focus on immigration, drugs, gangs and violent crime. He will likely face questions from lawmakers about his swift undoing of Obama-era protections for gay and transgender people and his rollback of criminal justice policies that aimed to reduce the federal prison population, among other changes he has made in nine months since taking office.


Trump and the new politics of honoring war dead
WASHINGTON (AP) - After her Army son died in an armored vehicle rollover in Syria in May, Sheila Murphy says, she got no call or letter from President Donald Trump, even as she waited months for his condolences and wrote him that "some days I don't want to live." In contrast, Trump called to comfort Eddie and Aldene Lee about 10 days after their Army son was killed in an explosion while on patrol in Iraq in April. "Lovely young man," Trump said, according to Aldene. She thought that was a beautiful word to hear about her boy, "lovely." Like presidents before him, Trump has made personal contact with some families of the fallen, not all.


Watch Top News Video




Trump says Comey knew he was going to exonerate Clinton
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Wednesday to revive his long-standing complaint about the FBI's handling of the Hillary Clinton email server investigation, alleging that then-Director James Comey had protected the Democratic presidential nominee by prematurely "exonerating" her before the 2016 election. "Comey stated under oath that he didn't do this - obviously a fix?" Trump wrote. "Where is Justice Dept?" Trump's latest online burst came in response to the FBI's release of heavily blacked out draft statements from May 2016 by Comey in preparation for closing the Clinton investigation without criminal charges. Trump tweeted that the draft statements, whose existence was previously known, show the FBI had exonerated "Crooked Hillary Clinton" long before the investigation was complete.


Health care plan sponsor says Trump offers encouragement
WASHINGTON (AP) - A chief sponsor of a bipartisan Senate deal to curb the growth of health insurance premiums said Wednesday President Donald Trump called to offer encouragement, a day after the president spoke favorably of the pact but then reversed course. The mixed signals from the White House have created confusion even as voters face the prospect of dramatic premium spikes absent congressional action. "I think he wants to reserve his options," Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee told an Axios forum on Wednesday after the president's call. Alexander said Trump wanted "to be encouraging," and the senator predicted that his deal would pass "in one form or another" by year's end.


Tough housing market awaits California wildfire victims
PETALUMA, Calif. (AP) - As firefighters gain on wildfires burning in Northern California's wine country, the many thousands who lost their houses, condos and apartments in those fires will have to find a new place to live in one of the toughest housing markets in the nation. In San Francisco, an average one-bedroom apartment rents for more than $3,000 a month and the median home price is about $1.5 million. The climbing cost of living has reached the greater San Francisco Bay Area, which includes parts of the fire areas. The fires that swept through parts of seven counties were the deadliest and most destructive series of blazes in in California history.


UN, US failed to prevent 'ethnic cleansing' in South Sudan
YEI, South Sudan (AP) - Until the summer of 2016, South Sudan's Yei region was a leafy oasis in the midst of the country's civil war. But when a national peace deal broke down and government soldiers ransacked the area, a handful of U.N. and U.S. officials begged their leaders for help. The United Nations must send peacekeepers to Yei to protect civilians from President Salva Kiir's forces, who are burning villages and slaughtering men, women and children, they argued. And the U.S. needs to change its approach in the face of a potential genocide, they warned. The pleas of officials and residents fell on deaf ears.


Ultra-personal therapy: Gene tumor boards guide cancer care
SAN DIEGO (AP) - Doctors were just guessing a decade ago when they gave Alison Cairnes' husband a new drug they hoped would shrink his lung tumors. Now she takes it too, but the choice was no guesswork. Sophisticated gene tests suggested it would fight her gastric cancer, and they were right. Cancer patients increasingly are having their care guided by gene tumor boards, a new version of the hospital panels that traditionally decided whether surgery, radiation or chemotherapy would be best. These experts study the patient's cancer genes and match treatments to mutations that seem to drive the disease.


For ornery shelter cats, 2nd chance is a job chasing mice
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Gary wasn't used to being around people. He didn't like being touched, or even looked at. If anyone came too close, he'd lash out. He was perfect for the job. Because at the "Working Cats" program, no manners is no problem. Philadelphia's Animal Care and Control Team established the program about four years ago to place unadoptable cats - the biters and the skittish, the swatters and the ones who won't use a litter box - into jobs as mousers at barns or stables. The shelter recently expanded the program to move cats that were less-than-ideal pets into urban jobs at places like factories and warehouses as a sort of green pest control.


In Egypt, archaeologists find part of 4,000-year-old statue
CAIRO (AP) - Egypt says archaeologists have discovered the head of a wooden statue, likely belonging to a female regent who ruled the country more than 4,000 years ago. Wednesday's statement by the Antiquities Ministry says the artifact was found in the district of Saqqara, near the ancient Pyramids of Giza. It says the part of the statue is in poor condition and will have to undergo restoration The uncovered head is believed to depict Ankhesenpepi II, the mother of King Pepi II of the 6th dynasty who ascended to the throne at the age of six. She ruled Egypt as regent during the early years of his reign.