AP Top News at 10:32 p.m. EST

Over 1 million join anti-Trump women's marches worldwide
WASHINGTON (AP) - In a global exclamation of defiance and solidarity, more than 1 million people rallied at women's marches in the nation's capital and cities around the world Saturday to send President Donald Trump an emphatic message on his first full day in office that they won't let his agenda go unchallenged. "Welcome to your first day, we will not go away!" marchers in Washington chanted. Many of the women came wearing pink, pointy-eared "pussyhats" to mock the new president. Plenty of men joined in, too, contributing to surprising numbers everywhere from New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and Los Angeles to Mexico City, Paris, Berlin, London, Prague and Sydney.


Trump praises the CIA, bristles over inaugural crowd counts
LANGLEY, Va. (AP) - On his first full day in office, President Donald Trump on Saturday berated the media over its coverage of his inauguration, and turned a bridge-building first visit to CIA headquarters into an airing of grievances about "dishonest" journalists. But it was Trump who spread inaccuracies about the size of the crowds at his swearing in. Standing in front of a memorial for fallen CIA agents, Trump assured intelligence officials, "I am so behind you." He made no mention of his repeated criticism of the intelligence agencies following the election, including his public challenges of their high-confidence assessment that Russia meddled in the White House race to help him win.


AP PHOTOS: Women's marches flood parks, streets worldwide
Masses of people flooded parks, streets and city squares around the world Saturday marching in solidarity in a show of empowerment and a stand against President Donald Trump. The crowds of women, men and children stood in the rain, snow and sun. Many wore pink "pussyhats" to mock the new president. As they moved through streets or gathered in parks, they voiced support for women and immigrants' rights, health care, Black Lives Matter, education and other causes. Many carried signs with messages such as "Love trumps hate" and "Women won't back down." Parts of some cities were brought to a halt as marchers packed train stations and snarled traffic.


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From London to LA, women's marches pack cities big and small
CHICAGO (AP) - Chicago. Oklahoma City. London. Los Angeles. Across the globe, cities big and small saw throngs of women, men and children take to the streets Saturday in a show of unity and support for women's rights. The swarms of marchers came together in the sunshine and rain to rally against sexism, racism and hatred and to protest President Donald Trump. The crowds were so large that some U.S. cities ground to a halt as demonstrators overwhelmed streets, train stations and parks. The more than 600 "sister marches" were held in conjunction with the Women's March on Washington a day after Trump's inauguration.


Trump's DC hotel a hub of activity and ethics questions
WASHINGTON (AP) - Red, white and blue balloons rained down over crystal chandeliers in the soaring atrium of the Trump International Hotel at midnight Friday - "a new inaugural tradition," its social media account promised. But while President Donald Trump's hotel in Washington did serve as a hub of inaugural activities, it also stands as ground zero for what top Democrats and some ethics advisers see as his unique web of conflicts of interest. Trump's lease with the federal government to develop and operate a hotel inside the historic Old Post Office building expressly prohibits any elected official from benefiting from the property, yet Trump has not divested from his company or this particular project.


'Is God mad?' Mississippi tornado wreaks havoc; kills 4
HATTIESBURG, Miss. (AP) - Rain was pouring down in the pre-dawn darkness, and the wind was picking up as Darryl McMorris ran for his daughters' bedroom. The windows started blowing out as he dove on top of his girls, grabbing one under each arm as he tried to protect them. "As soon as I did that it seemed like we were flying in the air," he recalled Saturday. Walls began to collapse and the house began to blow apart as his daughters screamed. But he held on tight. When the tornado finished ripping its way through their Hattiesburg home he and the two girls were under a wall.


Iraqi forces eye tougher fight in Mosul's west
MOSUL, Iraq (AP) - A crowd of Iraqi officers looked out at the Tigris River Friday from a balcony of Mosul's Nineveh International hotel. Just over three months ago, the men were some 45 kilometers (28 miles) away in a cluster of desert villages on the edge of Nineveh plain. "Our message to the rest of Mosul's residents is that victory is near," said Lt. Gen. Abdul-Ghani al-Asadi, on a celebratory tour after the city's east was declared largely liberated on Wednesday. The progress of Iraqi forces, halting at first, sped up this month as they closed in on the river that roughly divides Mosul into eastern and western halves.


Crossing red lines: What's annoying Asian nations most?
How can you get under the skin of an Asian country? Diplomatic body searches, bomber flights, shrine statues and even doormats have set governments on edge. Here's a nation-by-nation look at Asia's figurative, and in one case literal, sacred cows: --- SOUTH KOREA South Korea takes offense first, and most regularly, with Japan, largely over disputes stemming from Tokyo's 35-year colonization of the Korean Peninsula in the early 20th century. But President Donald Trump has proven surprisingly good at pushing buttons in Seoul in recent months. During his campaign, Trump suggested that the United States would let South Korea defend itself from North Korean aggression if Seoul didn't pay more for the stationing of 28,500 American troops in the country.


Gambia's defeated leader leaves country, ends standoff
BANJUL, Gambia (AP) - Gambia's defeated leader Yahya Jammeh and his family headed into political exile Saturday night, ending a 22-year reign of fear and a post-election political standoff that threatened to provoke a regional military intervention when he clung to power. As he mounted the stairs to the plane, he turned to the crowd, kissed his Quran and waved one last time to supporters, including soldiers who cried at his departure. The flight came almost 24 hours after Jammeh announced on state television he was ceding power to the newly inaugurated Adama Barrow, in response to mounting international pressure for his ouster.


Pope: I'll judge Trump after we see what he does
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope Francis says he'll wait to see what U.S. President Donald Trump does before forming an opinion about him. In an interview published Saturday evening by Spanish newspaper El Pais, Francis says he doesn't like "judging people early. We'll see what Trump does." Asked about populist-style political leaders emerging in the United States and Europe, Francis warned against seeking a savior in times of crisis. He said Adolf Hitler in the 1930s' Germany "was voted for by the people and then he destroyed the people." Francis laments that in crises "we look for a savior to give us back identity, and we defend ourselves with walls, barbed-wire fences, from other peoples." He was interviewed Friday at the Vatican at the same time as Trump's inauguration ceremony.