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AP Top News at 11:34 a.m. EDT

Turkish authorities identify suicide bombers; death toll 43
ISTANBUL (AP) - The three suicide bombers who attacked Istanbul airport were a Russian, an Uzbek and a Kyrgyz, a senior Turkish official said Thursday, hours after police carried out sweeping raids across the city looking for Islamic State suspects. Tuesday's gunfire and suicide bombing attack at Ataturk Airport killed 43 people and wounded more than 230 others. The day opened with police conducting raids on 16 locations in Istanbul, rounding up 13 people suspected of having links to the Islamic State group, the most likely perpetrator of the attack at one of the world's busiest airports. The manhunt spanned three neighbourhoods on the city's Asian and European sides.


Boris bows out: UK in shock as Johnson avoids leadership bid
LONDON (AP) - The race to become Britain's next prime minister took a dramatic, unexpected turn Thursday as former London Mayor Boris Johnson - popular with the public and widely considered to be a front-runner - ruled himself out of contention after the defection of a key ally. In a morning of political machinations and high-stakes treachery that had commentators reaching for Shakespearean parallels, Justice Secretary Michael Gove abruptly withdrew his support for Johnson and announced he would run for the Conservative Party leadership himself. Johnson, a prominent campaigner for Britain's withdrawal from the 28-nation European Union, then told a news conference that the next Conservative leader would need to unite the party and ensure Britain's standing in the world.


At 150, KKK sees opportunities in US political trends
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) - Born in the ashes of the smoldering South after the Civil War, the Ku Klux Klan died and was reborn before losing the fight against civil rights in the 1960s. Membership dwindled, a unified group fractured, and one-time members went to prison for a string of murderous attacks against blacks. Many assumed the group was dead, a white-robed ghost of hate and violence. Yet today, the KKK is still alive and dreams of restoring itself to what it once was: an invisible white supremacist empire spreading its tentacles throughout society. As it marks 150 years of existence, the Klan is trying to reshape itself for a new era


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Military base near DC lifts lockdown except for clinic
JOINT BASE ANDREWS, Md. (AP) - A military post near Washington said a lockdown was lifted Thursday except for a medical building where an active shooter was reported earlier in the day. Joint Base Andrews said in a tweet about 10:20 a.m. that the all-clear was given for the base except for the medical building. The base did not say why the Malcolm Grow Medical Facility remained on lockdown. A law enforcement official says no active shooter was found at the military post outside Washington. The law enforcement official was not authorized to discuss the matter by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.


Report: US sailors ill-prepared for Iran encounter in Gulf
WASHINGTON (AP) - Weak leadership, poor judgment, a lack of "warfighting toughness" and a litany of errors led to the embarrassing capture and detention by Iran of 10 U.S. sailors in the Persian Gulf in January, according to a Navy investigation released Thursday. Six officers and three enlisted sailors have been disciplined or face disciplinary action. The partially censored report also cited instances of unnamed sailors violating the military's code of conduct while in captivity. One sailor made "statements adverse to U.S. interests" during interrogation. A different sailor encouraged fellow crewmembers to eat food offered to them while being videotaped by the Iranians.


Conn. police more likely to use stun guns on minorities
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Hispanics shot with stun guns by police in Connecticut in 2015 were more likely to be fired upon multiple times than other racial groups, according to an analysis released Thursday of the first statewide data of police stun gun use in the United States. In cases where police pull stun guns, the report says officers also were more likely to fire them in confrontations involving minorities, as The Associated Press first reported in January after obtaining preliminary data collected from police departments around the state. Officers fired the weapons, as opposed to merely brandishing them, 60 percent of the time in confrontations involving whites, 81 percent of the time in those involving blacks and 66 percent of the time in those involving Hispanics.


Palestinian kills Israeli girl, 13, sleeping in her bedroom
JERUSALEM (AP) - A Palestinian assailant broke into a home in a West Bank settlement early Thursday and stabbed a 13-year-old Jewish girl to death as she slept in bed, the latest in a nine-month wave of violence that had recently shown signs of tapering off. The attacker, identified as a 17-year-old high school dropout, was fatally shot by security guards. The Israeli military sealed off the entrances to a nearby village, the home of the attacker, as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called on both the Palestinian leadership and the international community to condemn the brutal assault. "The horrifying murder of a young girl in her bed underscores the bloodlust and inhumanity of the incitement-driven terrorists that we are facing," Netanyahu said after an emergency meeting with his defense minister.


Clinton and Lynch met privately at Phoenix airport
NEW YORK (AP) - Former President Bill Clinton spoke with Attorney General Loretta Lynch during an impromptu meeting in Phoenix, but Lynch said the discussion did not involve the investigation into Hillary Clinton's email use as secretary of state. Lynch told reporters that the meeting at a Phoenix airport on Monday was unplanned and happened while the former president was waiting to depart and walked over to the attorney general's plane after she landed there. Lynch was traveling with her husband and said her conversation with the former president "was a great deal about his grandchildren" and their travels. The former president, who recently became a grandfather for the second time, told her he had been playing golf in Arizona and they discussed former Attorney General Janet Reno, whom they both know.


Plight of African lions persists 1 year after Cecil killing
JOHANNESBURG (AP) - Some call it the Cecil the lion effect. A year ago, an American killed a lion in Zimbabwe in what authorities said was an illegal hunt, infuriating people worldwide and invigorating an international campaign against trophy hunting in Africa. Some conservationists, however, warn there are greater threats to Africa's beleaguered lion populations, including human encroachment on their habitats and the poaching of antelopes and other animals for food, a custom that deprives lions of prey. The death of Cecil at Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park raised lions' profile on the "conservation radar," but most substantive steps in lion conservation since then have been directed against trophy hunting rather than bigger problems depleting lion numbers, said Luke Hunter, president of Panthera, a conservation group.


Journey to Jupiter: NASA spacecraft nears planet rendezvous
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Jupiter takes center stage with the arrival next week of a NASA spacecraft built to peek through its thick, swirling clouds and map the planet from the inside out. The solar-powered Juno spacecraft is on the final leg of a five-year, 1.8 billion-mile (2.8 billion-kilometer) voyage to the biggest planet in the solar system. Juno promises to send back the best close-up views as it circles the planet for a year. Jupiter is a gas giant made up mostly of hydrogen and helium unlike rocky Earth and its neighbor Mars. The fifth planet from the sun likely formed first and it could hold clues to how the solar system developed.