National & World News

AP Top News at 6:20 a.m. EDT

Ruling in travel ban leaves myriad questions unanswered
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court's decision to partially reinstate President Donald Trump's temporary travel ban has left the effort to keep some foreigners out of the United States in a murky middle ground, with unanswered questions and possibly more litigation ahead. The justices ruled Monday in an unsigned opinion they would hold a full hearing on the case in October. In the meantime, the administration can bar travelers from six majority-Muslim countries from the U.S. if they don't have a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship" with someone or some entity in the country. It's unclear what will ultimately constitute a "bona fide relationship," though the ruling suggested that an American job, school enrollment or a close relative could meet that threshold.


Q&A: Murkiness follows Supreme Court's action on travel ban
SEATTLE (AP) - On again, off again, off again, off again and now, partly back on: That's the peculiar route of President Donald Trump's travel ban after a Supreme Court decision Monday allowing a limited version to take effect. The high court said the president's 90-day ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced pending arguments scheduled for October as long as those visitors lack a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States." But much remains murky: What exactly is a bona fide relationship? Who gets to decide?


Syria denies US allegations of coming chemical attack
BEIRUT (AP) - Syria has denied White House allegations that it may be preparing a new chemical attack, insisting again that it has never used such arms. Ali Haidar, the minister for national reconciliation, told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the White House statement foreshadowed a "diplomatic battle" that would be waged against Syria in the halls of the U.N. The White House issued a stern warning to Syrian President Bashar Assad on Monday night, saying it had "potential" evidence that Syria was preparing for another chemical weapons attack. In an ominous statement issued with no supporting evidence or further explanation, Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the U.S.


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10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. WHAT MAY CONSTITUTE A 'BONA FIDE RELATIONSHIP' Those permitted into the United States under the partially reinstated travel ban may include those who have an American job, school enrollment or a close relative. 2. WHO HOLDS KEY TO HEALTH CARE BILL PASSAGE Trump's campaign promise to repeal and replace "Obamacare" is now in the hands of a key group of GOP senators who are opposing - or not yet supporting - the legislation. 3. WHITE HOUSE WARNS ASSAD AGAINST CHEMICAL ATTACK The White House claims "potential" evidence that Damascus is preparing for a gas attack similar to the one that killed dozens in April; Syria dismisses the statement.


These senators will make or break the GOP's health care push
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's campaign promise to repeal and replace "Obamacare" is now in the hands of a key group of GOP senators who are opposing -or not yet supporting - legislation Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pushing to bring to a vote this week. These lawmakers range from moderate to conservative Republicans, and include senators who were just re-elected and a couple facing tough re-election fights. Their concerns about the legislation vary along with their ideology, from those who say it's overly punitive in ejecting people from the insurance rolls, to others who say it doesn't go far enough in dismantling former President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.


Medicaid mission creep threatens GOP's 'Obamacare' repeal
WASHINGTON (AP) - Somewhere along the way, the Republican crusade to repeal "Obamacare" also turned into an effort to limit the future growth of Medicaid. That bit of mission creep is complicating prospects for the GOP, and could lead to deadlock. The federal-state program for low-income people has long been stigmatized as substandard. But over time it has grown and changed to become a mainstay for hospitals, nursing homes, insurers, and now drug treatment centers confronting the opioid epidemic. With about 70 million enrolled, Medicaid covers more people than Medicare, from newborns to nursing home residents. Republicans including Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Dean Heller of Nevada, and Govs.


Inmate details 4 prison killings: 'I did it for nothing'
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - One by one, Denver Simmons recalled, he and his partner lured inmates into his cell. William Scruggs was promised cookies in exchange for doing some laundry; Jimmy Ham thought he was coming to snort some crushed pills. Over the course of about a half-hour, four men accepted Simmons' hospitality. None of them made it out alive. Calmly, matter-of-factly, the 35-year-old inmate told The Associated Press how he and Jacob Philip strangled and beat their blockmates to death and hid their bodies to avoid spooking the next victims. They had nothing against the men; one of them was even a friend, Simmons admitted.


EU fines Google a record 2.42 billion euros
BRUSSELS (AP) - The European Union's competition watchdog slapped a record 2.42 billion euro ($2.72 billion) fine on internet giant Google on Tuesday for breaching antitrust rules with its online shopping service. European regulators said "Google has abused its market dominance as a search engine by giving an illegal advantage to another Google product, its comparison shopping service." It gave the Mountain View, California, company 90 days to stop or face fines of up to 5 percent of the average daily worldwide turnover of parent company Alphabet. The European Commission, which polices EU competition rules, alleges Google elevates its shopping service even when other options might have better deals.


Modi meets Trump with his usual greeting _ bear hugs
NEW DELHI (AP) - President Donald Trump should have been ready as he met with India's prime minister, an unabashed hugger. Smiling widely at a news conference Monday during a visit to Washington, Prime Minister Narendra Modi met the president's outstretched arm not as an invitation for a handshake, but as a pull toward an embrace. Then he did it again in the White House Rose Garden. Then once more before leaving. Trump appeared stiff and uncomfortable with the first hug, smiling thinly and patting Modi on the back a couple of times. But it was the same folksy, effusive greeting Modi has used with Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama, and a host of foreign dignitaries and celebrities, from former French President Francois Hollande, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Hollywood's Hugh Jackman.


What's next for Brazil's Temer following corruption charge?
SAO PAULO (AP) - Embattled in Congress and unpopular on the streets, President Michel Temer has now been charged with corruption by Brazil's top prosecutor in the wake of a plea bargain signed by executives of meatpacking company JBS. It is the first time that a sitting Brazilian president has been charged, but Temer has pledged to stay in office. In less than two months, he could be suspended from office, raising even more doubts about Brazil's future until October 2018 general elections. Here are the next steps in Temer's case: CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES After the formal accusation by Attorney Rodrigo Janot, the chief justice on Brazil's top court, Carmen Lucia, will request that the Chamber of Deputies authorize or reject the opening of proceedings against the president.

 

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