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AP Top News at 6:00 a.m. EDT

Who wins and loses under Obama's stricter power plant limits
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. The tweaks to Obama's unprecedented emissions limits on power plants, to be unveiled at the White House on Monday, aim to address a bevy of concerns raised by both environmentalist and the energy industry. The Environmental Protection Agency received more than 4 million public comments after Obama announced the proposed version last year, and opponents of the plan attempted unsuccessfully to stop it in Congress and in the courts.


Analysis: US-Turkey deal on Syria a big gamble
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan are both taking a big gamble as they agree to work together against the Islamic State group militants in Syria. Their goals, while overlapping in some ways, are far different in others, mainly on the question of how to handle Kurdish militants battling Islamic State fighters in Syria. And that's the problem.


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. OBAMA ORDERS STEEPER CUTS FROM POWER PLANTS


Watch Top News Video




Year later, AP reporter recalls origins of Ferguson movement
ST. LOUIS (AP) - EDITOR'S NOTE - A year ago, most Americans had never heard of the St. Louis suburb called Ferguson. But after a white police officer fatally shot a black 18-year-old in the street, the name of the middle-class community became virtually a household word. From the first hours after Michael Brown's death, Associated Press reporter Jim Salter watched as a neighborhood protest launched a national movement. ---


Raging Northern California wildfires prompt evacuations
LOWER LAKE, Calif. (AP) - Fire officials called for thousands of evacuations as numerous homes remained threatened by Northern California wildfires Monday, while more than 9,000 firefighters battled 21 major fires in the state, officials said. Wildfires were also burning in Washington and Oregon as the West Coast suffered from the effects of drought and summer heat.


Greek stock market reopens with 22 percent plunge
ATHENS, Greece (AP) - Greece's main stock index plunged over 22 percent as it reopened Monday after a five-week closure, giving investors their first opportunity since late June to react to the country's latest economic crisis. Greek bank stocks suffered the most, hitting or nearing the daily trading limit of a 30 percent loss. Markets in the rest of Europe, however, were largely unaffected.


Misery deepens for those in Puerto Rico who can't leave
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - Most tables are empty at Walter Martin's coffee shop in San Juan's colonial district. His brow is furrowed with concern and glistens with sweat in the sweltering Caribbean morning. He's turned off the air conditioning to lower his power bill. With fewer customers, he's cut staff hours and tried to make up the lost income by raising some prices. But Puerto Rico's entrenched economic crisis is leading people to either cut their personal spending to the basics or flee to the mainland to search for jobs, contributing to the struggles of those left on the island.


AP WAS THERE: US drops atomic bombs on Japan in 1945
EDITOR'S NOTE: On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs - one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the only times nuclear weapons have been used. Their unprecedented destructive power incinerated buildings and people and left lifelong physical and psychological scars on survivors and on the cities themselves. "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death," an AP story reported. A few days later, Japan announced its unconditional surrender. World War II was effectively over. Seventy years later, the AP is making stories about the bombings and surrender available, along with photos.


Most picky eating harmless but it can signal emotional woes
CHICAGO (AP) - Parents of picky eaters take heart: New research suggests the problem is rarely worth fretting over, although in a small portion of kids it may signal emotional troubles that should be checked out. Preschool-aged children who are extremely selective about what they eat and dislike even being near certain foods are more likely than others to have underlying anxiety or depression, the study found. But only 3 percent of young children studied were that picky.


What's going on with American Pharoah after Haskell win
OCEANPORT, N.J. (AP) - When the music played about 10 minutes before the start of the Haskell Invitational, there was no way American Pharoah could lose. As the Triple Crown winner stepped onto the track for first race since sweeping the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes, Monmouth Park's Haskell anthem was blasting away over the sound system, and many in the record crowd of 60,983 were singing along: "... tramps like us, baby we were born to run."



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The Wire

AP Top News at 6:00 a.m. EDT

Who wins and loses under Obama's stricter power plant limits
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. The tweaks to Obama's unprecedented emissions limits on power plants, to be unveiled at the White House on Monday, aim to address a bevy of concerns raised by both environmentalist and the energy industry. The Environmental Protection Agency received more than 4 million public comments after Obama announced the proposed version last year, and opponents of the plan attempted unsuccessfully to stop it in Congress and in the courts.


Analysis: US-Turkey deal on Syria a big gamble
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan are both taking a big gamble as they agree to work together against the Islamic State group militants in Syria. Their goals, while overlapping in some ways, are far different in others, mainly on the question of how to handle Kurdish militants battling Islamic State fighters in Syria. And that's the problem.


10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. OBAMA ORDERS STEEPER CUTS FROM POWER PLANTS


Watch Top News Video




Year later, AP reporter recalls origins of Ferguson movement
ST. LOUIS (AP) - EDITOR'S NOTE - A year ago, most Americans had never heard of the St. Louis suburb called Ferguson. But after a white police officer fatally shot a black 18-year-old in the street, the name of the middle-class community became virtually a household word. From the first hours after Michael Brown's death, Associated Press reporter Jim Salter watched as a neighborhood protest launched a national movement. ---


Raging Northern California wildfires prompt evacuations
LOWER LAKE, Calif. (AP) - Fire officials called for thousands of evacuations as numerous homes remained threatened by Northern California wildfires Monday, while more than 9,000 firefighters battled 21 major fires in the state, officials said. Wildfires were also burning in Washington and Oregon as the West Coast suffered from the effects of drought and summer heat.


Greek stock market reopens with 22 percent plunge
ATHENS, Greece (AP) - Greece's main stock index plunged over 22 percent as it reopened Monday after a five-week closure, giving investors their first opportunity since late June to react to the country's latest economic crisis. Greek bank stocks suffered the most, hitting or nearing the daily trading limit of a 30 percent loss. Markets in the rest of Europe, however, were largely unaffected.


Misery deepens for those in Puerto Rico who can't leave
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - Most tables are empty at Walter Martin's coffee shop in San Juan's colonial district. His brow is furrowed with concern and glistens with sweat in the sweltering Caribbean morning. He's turned off the air conditioning to lower his power bill. With fewer customers, he's cut staff hours and tried to make up the lost income by raising some prices. But Puerto Rico's entrenched economic crisis is leading people to either cut their personal spending to the basics or flee to the mainland to search for jobs, contributing to the struggles of those left on the island.


AP WAS THERE: US drops atomic bombs on Japan in 1945
EDITOR'S NOTE: On two days in August 1945, U.S. planes dropped two atomic bombs - one on Hiroshima, one on Nagasaki, the only times nuclear weapons have been used. Their unprecedented destructive power incinerated buildings and people and left lifelong physical and psychological scars on survivors and on the cities themselves. "Practically all living things, human and animal, were literally seared to death," an AP story reported. A few days later, Japan announced its unconditional surrender. World War II was effectively over. Seventy years later, the AP is making stories about the bombings and surrender available, along with photos.


Most picky eating harmless but it can signal emotional woes
CHICAGO (AP) - Parents of picky eaters take heart: New research suggests the problem is rarely worth fretting over, although in a small portion of kids it may signal emotional troubles that should be checked out. Preschool-aged children who are extremely selective about what they eat and dislike even being near certain foods are more likely than others to have underlying anxiety or depression, the study found. But only 3 percent of young children studied were that picky.


What's going on with American Pharoah after Haskell win
OCEANPORT, N.J. (AP) - When the music played about 10 minutes before the start of the Haskell Invitational, there was no way American Pharoah could lose. As the Triple Crown winner stepped onto the track for first race since sweeping the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes, Monmouth Park's Haskell anthem was blasting away over the sound system, and many in the record crowd of 60,983 were singing along: "... tramps like us, baby we were born to run."



Event Calendar


Submit an Event

Advertising Services

Marketplace