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Activists: 98 dead in assault on rebel-held Damascus suburb
BEIRUT (AP) - Intense Syrian government shelling and airstrikes of rebel-held Damascus suburbs killed at least 98 people in what was the deadliest day in the area in three years, a monitoring group and paramedics said Tuesday. A day after Monday's government barrage, retaliatory shells rained down on the capital Damascus, killing at least one person on Tuesday. The targeted suburbs - scattered across an area known as eastern Ghouta - have been subjected to weeks-long bombardment that has killed and wounded hundreds of people. Opposition activists say government forces have brought in more reinforcements in recent days, suggesting a major assault is imminent to recapture the area that is the last main rebel stronghold near Damascus.


Students head to Florida capital to press for gun law change
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) - A hundred Stoneman Douglas High School students are busing 400 miles to Florida's capital Tuesday to urge lawmakers to act to prevent a repeat of the massacre that killed 17 students and faculty last week. The students plan to hold a rally Wednesday in hopes that it will put pressure on the state's Republican-controlled Legislature to consider a sweeping package of gun-control laws, something some GOP lawmakers said Monday they would consider. Shortly after the shooting, several legislative leaders were taken on a tour of the school to see the damage firsthand and they appeared shaken afterward.


Fighting gun violence after shooting gives teens purpose
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) - Chris Grady was a theater kid counting down the days until he reported for duty in the U.S. Army this summer, when a gunman opened fire at his school. As he huddled in his classroom at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last Wednesday listening to shots ring out nearby, what he felt wasn't fear, but anger. "Full-on anger," the thin, curly haired 19-year-old said. Grady's anger deepened the day after the shooting, when he heard news that the FBI had failed to follow up on a tip about the former student who police say gunned down 14 students and three staff members with an AR-15 styled rifle.


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10 Things to Know for Today
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. SCORES OF CASUALTIES REPORTED AFTER BOMBARDMENT Government shelling and airstrikes on rebel-held suburbs of Damascus killed at least 98 people, a Syrian monitoring group and paramedics say. 2. 'THEY ARE GOING TO HEAR US OUT' A hundred Stoneman Douglas High School students are busing 400 miles to Florida's capital to urge lawmakers to act to prevent a repeat of the massacre that killed 17 students and faculty. 3. OLYMPIC PLEDGE UNLIKELY TO BE KEPT Hope is fading that Pyeongchang will do what it promised during its successful 2011 Olympics bid and turn an impoverished backwater into a premiere Asian ski destination.


Trump offers support for background checks on gun buys
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) - From the confines of his golf club, President Donald Trump offered support for a limited strengthening of federal background checks on gun purchases Monday while staying largely mum in the last few days about the victims of the Florida school massacre and the escalating debate about controls on weapons. One side of that debate was represented outside the White House as dozens of teens spread their bodies across the pavement to symbolize the dead and call for stronger gun controls, a precursor to a march in Washington planned next month by survivors of the Parkland school shooting and supporters of their cause.


Joint Koreas hockey team ends historic Olympic run
GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) - They cheered. They cried. They hugged. They watched as fans by the thousands shouted, "We are one." Unification flags for the two Koreas, longtime rivals and sometimes bitter enemies, flapped across the Olympic arena. And now they go back home, quite possibly never to see each other again. The Korean women's hockey team, which included players from both North and South, ended its historic Olympic run on Tuesday with a fifth straight loss but a host of unforgettable feel-good sparks. Team Korea was defeated by Sweden 6-1 in a seventh-place match in the Pyeongchang Games on Tuesday, a healthy crowd again on hand to cheer them on.


Forget tourism: Pyeongchang's legacy probably debt and anger
PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) - The equation was supposed to be simple. To build a world-class ski destination, simply add the Olympics and wait. But even as South Korea basks in the glow of daily competition and global attention, hope is fading that Pyeongchang will do what was promised during its successful 2011 Olympics bid and turn an ignored, impoverished backwater into a premier Asian ski hub. With the close of the games this weekend approaching, some worry that the Olympics will instead saddle the region with a legacy of massive debt and the perpetual maintenance of a handful of hugely expensive venues that no one knows what to do with.


Police suspect Netanyahu associate of trying to bribe judge
JERUSALEM (AP) - Israeli police on Tuesday said they suspect a close confidant of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of offering a sitting judge a top posting in exchange for dropping a corruption case against Netanyahu's wife. The development marks the latest scandal to engulf the beleaguered Israeli leader's inner circle. Netanyahu already stands accused of bribery in two other cases. Nir Hefetz, a former spokesman of the Netanyahu family, is suspected of suggesting to Judge Hila Gerstel that she could be appointed attorney general if she killed a pending case against Sara Netanyahu's excessive household spending. The offer never materialized. Earlier, police named Hefetz as one of two Netanyahu associates under arrest for their suspected role in a separate wide-ranging corruption probe.


Ohio businessman, deported after 38 years in US, vows return
AMMAN, Jordan (AP) - Amer Othman's life turned upside down in an instant. The Ohio entrepreneur, who came to the United States 38 years ago and won praise for helping revive once-blighted downtown Youngstown, was arrested during what he thought was another check-in with immigration authorities. He was detained for two weeks and then deported to his native Jordan. Othman's supporters in the U.S. view such treatment as a particularly egregious example of the Trump administration's ramped-up deportation campaign that potentially targets anyone lacking the right papers, including long-time residents with American spouses and children. Recent cases include a Missouri college lecturer and a Connecticut couple running a nail salon who won last-minute reprieves through local politicians but remain at risk of expulsion.


Stuck in an opioids crisis, officials turn to acupuncture
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) - Marine veteran Jeff Harris was among the first to sign up when the Providence VA hospital started offering acupuncture for chronic pain. "I don't like taking pain medication. I don't like the way it makes me feel," he said. Harris also didn't want to risk getting addicted to heavy-duty prescription painkillers. Although long derided as pseudoscience and still questioned by many medical experts, acupuncture is increasingly being embraced by patients and doctors, sometimes as an alternative to the powerful painkillers behind the nation's opioid crisis. The military and Veterans Affairs medical system has been offering acupuncture for pain for several years, some insurance companies cover it and now a small but growing number of Medicaid programs in states hit hard by opioid overdoses have started providing it for low-income patients.