AP COVERAGE

AP Top News at 4:16 a.m. EDT

Schumer seizes on Trump team's offer to work with Dems
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's aides opened the door to working with moderate Democrats on health care and other issues while Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer quickly offered to find common ground with Trump for repairing former President Barack Obama's health care law. Schumer said Sunday that Trump must be willing to drop attempts to repeal his predecessor's signature achievement, warning that Trump was destined to "lose again" on other parts of his agenda if he remained beholden to conservative Republicans. Trump initially focused the blame for the failure on Democrats and predicted a dire future for the current law.


South Korean prosecutors push to arrest ousted president
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - South Korean prosecutors said Monday that they want to arrest former President Park Geun-hye over the corruption allegations that triggered a huge political scandal and toppled her from power. The move comes after prosecutors grilled Park for 14 hours last week over suspicions that she colluded with a jailed confidante to extort from companies and committed other wrongdoing when she was in office. The Seoul prosecutors' office said in a statement that it asked a local court to issue an arrest warrant for Park. The Seoul Central District Court said it would hold a hearing Thursday to decide on the prosecutors' request.


AP Exclusive: 'Bathroom bill' to cost North Carolina $3.76B
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - Despite Republican assurances that North Carolina's "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy, the law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years, according to an Associated Press analysis. Over the past year, North Carolina has suffered financial hits ranging from scuttled plans for a PayPal facility that would have added an estimated $2.66 billion to the state's economy to a canceled Ringo Starr concert that deprived a town's amphitheater of about $33,000 in revenue. The blows have landed in the state's biggest cities as well as towns surrounding its flagship university, and from the mountains to the coast.


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Police search for suspects in deadly nightclub shooting
CINCINNATI (AP) - Cincinnati police searched for suspects in a nightclub shooting that left one man dead and 15 other people injured and sent club patrons diving to the ground to dodge bullets in what they described as a chaotic and terrifying scene. A gunfight broke out inside the crowded Cameo club early Sunday after a dispute among several patrons escalated into a shootout, authorities said. Some 200 people were inside the club near the Ohio River east of downtown Cincinnati at the time. "What we know at this point in the investigation is that several local men got into some type of dispute inside the bar, and it escalated into shots being fired from several individuals," Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac said.


Russian opposition leader Navalny in Moscow court
MOSCOW (AP) - Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny is making a court appearance Monday, a day after being detained at a major opposition rally the previous day. Tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets across Russia on Sunday in the biggest show of defiance since the 2011-2012 anti-government protests. The Kremlin has dismissed the opposition as Westernized urban elite disconnected from the issues faced by the poor in Russia's far-flung regions, but Sunday's protests included demonstrations in the areas which typically produce a high vote for President Vladimir Putin, from Siberia's Chita to Dagestan's Makhachkala. Russian police say that about 500 people were arrested, while human rights groups say 1,000 were taken into custody.


Despite some tensions, evangelical churches booming in Cuba
HAVANA (AP) - Fidel Castro's government sent the Rev. Juan Francisco Naranjo to two years of work camp in the 1960s for preaching the Gospel in a Cuba where atheism was law and the faithful were viewed as suspect. For years, Naranjo's church was almost abandoned, with just a handful of people daring to attend services. Naranjo died in 2000 but on a recent Sunday, his William Carey Baptist Church was packed and noisy. Government doctors treated disabled children at a clinic inside. A Bible study group discussed Scripture in one corner of the building before a service attended by 200 of the faithful.


Trump plans office to bring business ideas to government
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump is set to announce a new White House office run by his son-in-law that will seek to overhaul government functions using ideas from the business sector. A senior administration official said Trump on Monday will announce the White House Office of American Innovation. The official sought anonymity to discuss the office in advance of the formal rollout. The plans for the office were first reported by The Washington Post. The innovation office will be led by Jared Kushner, a senior adviser to Trump, and will report directly to the president. Among those working on the effort are National Economic Council director Gary Cohn, Dina Powell, senior counselor to the president for economic initiatives and deputy national security adviser, Chris Liddell, assistant to the president for strategic initiatives and Reed Cordish, assistant to the president for intragovernmental and technology initiatives.


Some balk as Seattle seeks to spend more money on homeless
SEATTLE (AP) - Sixteen months after he declared a state of emergency on homelessness, Seattle's mayor is asking voters in this liberal, affluent city for $55 million a year in new taxes to fight the problem. But some are pushing back, saying the city already spends millions to combat homelessness, and things appear to have gotten worse, not better. In making his case, Mayor Ed Murray says the problem has grown exponentially and federal and state help is unlikely. He wants voters to support a proposed ballot initiative that would increase property taxes to raise $275 million over five years for homeless services - almost doubling what Seattle spends each year.


Agency follows a uniquely American way of funding arts
NEW YORK (AP) - When the National Endowment for the Arts was established in 1965, organizers had different models to choose from. They could have looked to the French Ministry of Culture, a cabinet-level institution committed to maintaining France's cultural heritage. Or they could have copied the generous and government-directed support favored by some Scandinavian countries, or even the state-controlled art of their Cold War rivals: the Soviet Union and China. But the NEA, which the Trump administration wants to eliminate along with Legal Services Corp., the Institute of Museum and Library Services and dozens of other agencies and programs, developed in uniquely American fashion: diverse and independent, with a significant part of the budget distributed to state and local organizations.


TIPPING OFF: Final Four welcomes trio of 1st-time coaches
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - Frank Martin never got caught up in wins and losses, the highs and the lows, as he worked to build South Carolina into a contender for conference championships. Gonzaga's Mark Few dismissed questions of whether his Bulldogs would be a failure as long as they failed to get to a Final Four after so many great regular seasons. And Oregon's Dana Altman focused on turning one deep NCAA Tournament run into something more. Whatever their differences in personality, playing style and approach, that trio now shares something in common after all that work: each is headed to his first Final Four.