.HOMECONTACT | NEWS
 

AP Top News at 4:22 a.m. EST

Democrat Doug Jones has won a stunning victory in Alabama's Senate election, beating back history, an embattled Republican opponent and President Donald Trump
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) - In a stunning victory aided by scandal, Democrat Doug Jones won Alabama's special Senate election, beating back history, an embattled Republican opponent and President Donald Trump, who urgently endorsed GOP rebel Roy Moore despite a litany of sexual misconduct allegations. It was the first Democratic Senate victory in a quarter-century in Alabama, one of the reddest of red states, and proved anew that party loyalty is anything but certain in the age of Trump. Tuesday's Republican loss was a major embarrassment for the president and a fresh wound for the nation's already divided GOP. "We have shown not just around the state of Alabama, but we have shown the country the way - that we can be unified," Jones declared as supporters in a Birmingham ballroom cheered, danced and cried tears of joy.


Analysis: Trump bets on Moore and suffers stinging defeat
WASHINGTON (AP) - Rarely has a sitting president rallied behind such a scandal-plagued candidate the way Donald Trump did with Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore. And rarely has that bet failed so spectacularly. Moore's defeat Tuesday in Alabama - as stalwart a Republican state as they come - left Trump unusually conciliatory and his political allies shell-shocked. Trump had dug in on his support for Moore after a wave of allegations about the former judge's alleged sexual misconduct with teenagers when he was in his 30s, becoming one of the candidate's most ardent national supporters in the race's closing days.


A Bangladeshi immigrant is expected to appear before a federal magistrate to face terrorism charges accusing him of setting off an explosive strapped to his body in a New York City transportation hub
NEW YORK (AP) - In less than 24 hours, authorities say a would-be suicide bomber's botched attack on a Manhattan transportation hub underneath Times Square became an open-and-shut case after a search of his apartment and hearing the suspect's own words. Akayed Ullah, who's expected to make his first court appearance on Wednesday, made it clear from a hospital bed where he was being treated for burns from a pipe bomb he strapped to his body that he was on a mission to punish the United States for attacking the Islamic State group, said Acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim. A search of the Bangladeshi immigrant's apartment turned up bomb-making materials, including screws matching those found at the scene intended as carnage-creating shrapnel.


Watch Top News Video




Under Putin, Russia increases clout and gains regional footprint in Mideast that even Soviet Union couldn't dream of
MOSCOW (AP) - When Russia launched a military campaign in Syria two years ago, President Vladimir Putin sought to save his ally from imminent collapse and break Russia's international isolation over a crisis in Ukraine. He achieved that and more, emerging as a key stakeholder in the Middle East who has brokered deals with many of its key players - from Iran to Saudi Arabia to Turkey and Israel. It's a regional footprint that comes with a degree of clout that even the Soviet Union, which depended on a handful of Arab allies, couldn't dream of during the Cold War era.


The working-class city of Everett, Washington, has tried an array of strategies as it confronts a surge in the number of people living on its streets with severe mental illness and drug addiction
EVERETT, Wash. (AP) - This is the lesson that the working-class city of Everett has learned: It takes a community to rescue the hardcore homeless. It takes teams of outreach workers - building relationships with men and women struggling with addiction or untreated mental illness, prodding them to get help. It takes police and other agencies, working together to provide for their needs. And it takes a prosecutor who was tired of managing the unending cycle of homelessness - jail-street-jail-street-jail. Hil Kaman left his job prosecuting the homeless and took up the challenge of finding solutions. For starters, he helped put together a team that would track the 25 most costly and vulnerable cases, and hover over each one individually until he or she was in treatment or housing.


President Donald Trump hasn't announced his Guantanamo Bay policy, but so far his administration has not released a single prisoner _ a sharp contrast to his two predecessors who transferred and released hundreds of men. Freshens summary.
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba (AP) - Abdellatif Nasser got what he thought was the best news possible in the summer of 2016: One of his lawyers called him at the Guantanamo Bay detention center and told him that the U.S. decided he no longer posed a threat and could go home to Morocco. The prisoner allowed himself to get excited, to think about Moroccan food, imagining he would be home in no time. "I've been here 14 years," he said at the time. "A few months more is nothing." But his optimism turned out to be misplaced. A diplomatic agreement that would have allowed him to go free was not returned by Morocco until Dec.


Jamey Anderson fled Word of Faith Fellowship church when he was 18, but he is not free. More than a decade later, he still struggles to find his footing in a world that he doesn't understand _ having been raised, as he puts it, in a "cult."
SPINDALE, N.C. (AP) - Jamey Anderson vividly recalls being a skinny kid trembling on the floor of a dank, windowless storage room, waiting in terror for the next adult to open the door. He was bruised and exhausted after being held down while a group of Word of Faith Fellowship congregants - including his mother and future stepfather - beat him with a wooden paddle, he said. As with most punishments at the secretive Christian church, Anderson said, it was prompted by some vague accusation: He had sin in his heart, or he had given in to the "unclean." The attacks could last for hours until he confessed to something, anything, and cried out to Jesus, he said.


A massive Republican tax package swiftly taking shape would pull down the top tax rate for wealthy Americans to 37 percent and slash the tax rate for corporations to a level slightly above what businesses and conservatives wanted.
WASHINGTON (AP) - A massive Republican tax package swiftly taking shape would pull down the top tax rate for wealthy Americans to 37 percent and slash the tax rate for corporations to a level slightly above what businesses and conservatives wanted. Republicans in Congress rushed Tuesday toward a deal. Lawmakers and aides labored at a fevered pace to blend separate tax bills that were passed recently by the House and Senate. The Republican goal is to deliver to President Donald Trump the first major rewrite of the U.S. tax system in more than three decades. GOP lawmakers hope to finalize blended legislation no later than Friday, vote next week and deliver the package of steep tax cuts for corporations and more modest cuts for families to the president before Christmas.


Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton is ready to name his pick to replace Sen. Al Franken.
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) - Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton was set to reveal his choice Wednesday to replace Al Franken in the U.S. Senate, with the top contender seen as his longtime adviser Lt. Gov. Tina Smith. Dayton has declined to answer questions about the appointment since Franken announced his impending resignation last week following allegations of sexual misconduct. In making the appointment, Dayton was weighing a short-term replacement against pressure from top Democrats in Washington to name someone who would run in 2018 in a special election to complete Franken's term ending in 2020. A Democratic official told The Associated Press last week that Dayton was ready to choose Smith as a placeholder before being pressured to appoint someone who could leverage the appointment into a 2018 run.


Five years after the Sandy Hook massacre, efforts to improve mental health care for young people have had mixed results
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Anguished mothers with mentally ill children have sought out Liza Long for help ever since she wrote an essay, "I am Adam Lanza's Mother," comparing experiences with her son to the emotionally troubled 20-year-old who carried out the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. The massacre sounded alarms nationally about gaps in mental health care and led to calls for better screening and services, especially for young people showing a propensity for violence, but some key reforms enacted in the wake of the Sandy Hook shooting depend on funding that has yet to be delivered by Congress. And Long still hears almost daily from families overwhelmed by their children's behaviors and struggling to get treatment.

   
   

 

~:~

Search for AP news  


Advertising with AM1400
is as EASY AS
1-2-3 .
Click Here
for more info.
 
 


     
       
Privacy Statement  |  Terms of Use
© 2007 The New WZAZ Gospel 1400. All Rights Reserved. Site Designed by Rhema Inspired Inc.