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AP Top News at 5:22 a.m. EDT

The suspected Golden State Killer became less prolific but deadlier after losing his job as a police officer
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - Joseph DeAngelo's six-year career as a cop came swiftly to an end after being busted for shoplifting a can of dog repellant and a hammer from a Pay N' Save store in a Sacramento suburb in 1979. Authorities are now wondering if the items he snatched were intended as tools for the sinister rash of crimes he's suspected of carrying out. DeAngelo, 72, was accused Wednesday of being the Golden State Killer who terrorized suburban neighborhoods in a spate of brutal rapes and slayings in the 1970s and '80s before leaving a cold trail that baffled investigators for decades.


The two Korean leaders will plant a commemorative tree and inspect an honor guard together after Kim Jong Un walks across the border Friday morning for their historic summit
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon-Jae-in will plant a commemorative tree and inspect an honor guard together after Kim walks across the border Friday for their historic summit, Seoul officials said Thursday. The talks on the southern side of the border village of Panmunjom are expected to focus on North Korea's nuclear program, but there will be plenty of symbolism when Kim becomes the first North Korean leader to be in the southern section of the border since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. Moon will receive Kim after he crosses the concrete slabs that form the rivals' military demarcation line Friday morning.


The summit Friday between the two Korean leaders must lay a strong foundation for a meeting between Kim and Trump in order to make real progress toward peace on the peninsula
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - It may lack the punch of President Donald Trump's vow to unleash "fire and fury" and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's "nuclear button" boasts, but the stakes will be high on Friday when Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in sit down on the southern side of the no man's land that forms the world's most heavily armed border. Kim may never abandon the nuclear weapons that he claims are all that stand between him and annihilation, but if the Koreas and the United States are going to begin stepping away from what, until a few months ago, looked like a real possibility of nuclear war, then Kim and Moon must lay the foundation with a successful summit of their own.


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Tens of thousands of teachers in Arizona and Colorado will shut down schools to protest low pay and funding.
PHOENIX (AP) - A wave of red-clad teachers will crash upon the Arizona state Capitol on Thursday for an unprecedented job action that will close schools for a majority of the state's public school students, part of an educator uprising that's also bubbled up in Colorado. Around 30,000 to 50,000 teachers and their supporters are expected to march through Phoenix to rally at the Arizona state Capitol to demand a 20 percent raise for teachers, about $1 billion to return school funding to pre-Great Recession levels and increased pay for support staff, among other things. In Colorado, more than 10,000 teachers are expected to demonstrate in Denver as part of a burgeoning teacher uprising.


Senate panel expected to vote on legislation to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's job, a bill that has split Republicans
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on a bill to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's job - legislation that has split Republicans as President Donald Trump has repeatedly criticized Mueller's Russia investigation. Two Republicans and two Democrats introduced the bill earlier this month as Trump publicly criticized the special counsel. Mueller is investigating potential ties between Russia and Trump's 2016 campaign as well as possible obstruction of justice by the president. The measure under consideration Thursday would give any special counsel a 10-day window to seek expedited judicial review of a firing. A handful of Republicans have supported it, but most have opposed it, arguing that it is unconstitutional or unnecessary.


Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt faces potentially make-or-break hearings on Capitol Hill, where he is expected to face questions about spending and ethics scandals that have triggered bipartisan calls for his ouster
WASHINGTON (AP) - Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt faces potentially make-or-break hearings Thursday on Capitol Hill, where he is expected to be peppered with questions about spending and ethics scandals that have triggered bipartisan calls for his ouster. Pruitt was scheduled to testify about his agency's budget in back-to-back hearings before two House subcommittees. The public grilling comes amid notable erosion in support for Pruitt among fellow Republicans after a nearly monthlong hammering of negative headlines about outsized security spending, first-class flights and a sweetheart condo lease. President Donald Trump has continued to stand by his EPA chief, but behind closed doors, White House officials concede Pruitt's job is in serious jeopardy.


Real shift in tactics or opportunism? Islamic militant Hamas says it's embracing what it considers non-violent tactics in mass protests on the border with Israel
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) - In a sit-in tent camp near the Gaza border with Israel, a lecturer answered questions from activists grappling with the concept of non-violent protest. They asked what's allowed, listing different actions. Throwing stones and holding rallies is permitted, he said. Throwing firebombs is a "maybe" and using knives a definite "no." Such workshops - held amid weekly mass marches on the border for the past month - are the latest sign of the Hamas militant group's search for new tactics for breaking the debilitating blockade of Gaza. Israel and Egypt closed the borders after Hamas overran Gaza in 2007, and Israel blockades the sea and controls the skies, making it increasingly difficult for the group to govern.


A bipartisan Senate subcommittee has found that the government risks placing migrant children in the custody of human traffickers because federal agencies have delayed crucial reforms needed to keep the children safe
The U.S. government risks placing migrant children in the custody of human traffickers because federal agencies have delayed crucial reforms needed to keep the children safe, according to the findings of a Senate subcommittee obtained by The Associated Press. Federal officials came under fire two years ago for rolling back child welfare policies meant to protect unaccompanied minors fleeing violence in Central America, and lawmakers said Thursday that the agencies had yet to take full responsibility for the children's care in the United States. Since the dramatic surge of border crossings in fall 2013, the federal government has placed more than 180,000 unaccompanied minors with parents or other adult sponsors in communities nationwide, where they are expected to attend school while they seek legal status in immigration court.


A new technique that relies on genetics is revolutionizing food poisoning investigation and identifying common causes in scattered and seemingly unrelated illnesses
ATLANTA (AP) - Disease hunters are using genetic sequencing in their investigation of the ongoing food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, a technique that is revolutionizing the detection of germs in food. The genetic analysis is being used to bolster investigations and - in some cases - connect the dots between what were once seemingly unrelated illnesses. It also is uncovering previously unfathomed sources of food poisoning, including one outbreak from apples dipped in caramel. So far, most of the work has largely focused on one germ, listeria. But it is expanding. By the end of this year, labs in all 50 states are expected to also be using genetic sequencing for much more common causes of food poisoning outbreaks, including salmonella and the E.


Penn State's Barkley is best talent, but QBs to lead draft
ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) - Saquon Barkley is the best player in this year's draft. Yet he might not go in the first handful of picks Thursday night. Huh? Blame the desperation to find quarterbacks in great part for the possibility that the Penn State All-America running back could fall well below where his talent, character and versatility warrant. How good is Barkley? Draft expert Gil Brandt says he's the best at the position since Adrian Peterson. Other scouts and general managers have compared Barkley to LaDainian Tomlinson. Last we looked, LT is in the Hall of Fame, and Peterson sure seems headed there.

   
   

 

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