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AP Top News at 9:35 p.m. EDT

Puerto Rico's Gov. Ricardo Rossello has imposed a curfew to allow rescue crews and officials to respond to Hurricane Maria's aftermath
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - The strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in more than 80 years destroyed hundreds of homes, knocked out power across the entire island and turned some streets into raging rivers Wednesday in an onslaught that could plunge the U.S. territory deeper into financial crisis. Leaving at least nine people dead in its wake across the Caribbean, Hurricane Maria blew ashore in the morning near the southeast coastal town of Yabucoa as a Category 4 storm with winds of 155 mph (250 kph). It punished the island of 3.4 million people with life-threatening winds for several hours, the second time in two weeks that Puerto Rico has felt the wrath of a hurricane.


A child's baptism turned into a tragedy when the roof of a church in the Mexican town of Atzala collapsed during a powerful earthquake, killing 11 members of a family, including the 2-month-old girl being christened
ATZALA, Mexico (AP) - A child's baptism turned into tragedy when the roof of a church collapsed as a powerful earthquake shook central Mexico. Eleven members of a family died, including the 2-month-old girl being christened. The only survivors were the girl's father, the priest and the priest's assistant, the Archdiocese of Puebla said Wednesday. At least four minors were among the dead. "It was a scene of horror, sadness with most of the people inside the church dying," priest's assistant Lorenzo Sanchez told The Associated Press. Sanchez said those who survived moved to the edges of the church when the swaying started while those who died didn't have time to do so.


The wiggling fingers of a young girl trapped in the rubble of her collapsed school in Mexico City have raised the hopes of hundreds of quake rescuers working furiously to try to free her
MEXICO CITY (AP) - The wiggling fingers of a young girl trapped in the rubble of her collapsed school in Mexico City raised hopes among hundreds of rescuers working furiously Wednesday to try to free her - a drama that played out at dozens of buildings toppled by the powerful earthquake that killed at least 230 people. But it was the rescue operation at the Enrique Rebsamen school, where 25 people including 21 children perished, that was seen as emblematic of Mexicans' rush to save survivors before time runs out. Helmeted workers spotted the girl buried in the debris early Wednesday and shouted to her to move her hand if she could hear.


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AP PHOTOS: 24 hours of fear, heroism after powerful quake rocks central Mexico
MEXICO CITY (AP) - It was 24 hours of terror and death, hope and heroism in Mexico. A faint, gentle swaying in the early afternoon on Tuesday quickly escalated into a violent, sickening dance with concrete as a magnitude 7.1 earthquake cracked and crumbled vulnerable buildings old and new. People by the millions rushed from homes and offices across central Mexico, sometimes watching as buildings they had just fled fell behind them with an eruption of dust and debris. Hundreds were trapped in the country's deadliest quake in three decades. Survivors quickly rallied, clambering over grotesque ruins of buildings and joining professional rescue workers to try to save friends, neighbors and strangers.


President Donald Trump's campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, said during the presidential race that he was willing to provide "private briefings" for a Russian billionaire the U.S. government considers close to Russian President Vladimir Putin
WASHINGTON (AP) - In the middle of Donald Trump's presidential run, then-campaign chairman Paul Manafort said he was willing to provide "private briefings" about the campaign to a Russian billionaire the U.S. government considers close to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Manafort's offer was memorialized in an email exchange with a former employee of his political consulting firm in July 2016. It was first reported by The Washington Post, which said portions of Manafort's emails were read to reporters. Manafort spokesman Jason Maloni confirmed to The Associated Press that the email exchanges were legitimate but said no briefings ever occurred. The email involved an offer for Oleg Deripaska, a wealthy Russian who made his money in the aluminum business.


Iran's president is warning the United States that his country will "respond decisively" to any violation of the agreement that reins in its nuclear program, and he's calling U.S. President Donald Trump's comments about Iran 'ignorant' and 'absurd'
UNITED NATIONS (AP) - Iran's president warned Wednesday that his country will "respond decisively" to any violation of the agreement that reins in its nuclear program and called U.S. President Donald Trump's "ignorant, absurd and hateful rhetoric" about Iran unfit for the United Nations. In remarks clearly directed at Trump's 8-month-old administration, Iranian leader Hassan Rouhani told the U.N. General Assembly: "It will be a great pity if this agreement were to be destroyed by rogue newcomers to the world of politics." "The world will have lost a great opportunity, but such unfortunate behavior will never impede Iran's course of progress and advancement," Rouhani said.


The United States and Iran hold their highest-level talks of Donald Trump's presidency, after Trump says he's made a decision on whether to withdraw from the landmark 2015 nuclear deal
NEW YORK (AP) - "I have decided," President Donald Trump declared Wednesday, announcing he'd reached a verdict on the Iran nuclear deal's future even before top U.S. and Iranian officials held their highest-level talks of his presidency. Iran's president, meanwhile, lashed out at "ignorant, absurd and hateful rhetoric" in response to Trump's blistering attack at the U.N. The jabbing between Trump and Iran's Hassan Rouhani set the stage for a contentious meeting of the nuclear accord's parties. Trump has sent strong signals that he could walk away from the seven-nation agreement, which would potentially lead to new U.S. sanctions on Iran and its international trading partners.


President Donald Trump says the GOP's last-ditch effort to repeal and replace 'Obamacare' remains two or three votes short heading toward a crucial Sept. 30 deadline
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump said Wednesday the Republicans' last-resort "Obamacare" repeal effort remains two or three votes short, forecasting days of furious lobbying ahead with a crucial deadline looming next week. The legislation by Sens. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina would repeal major pillars of former President Barack Obama's health law, replacing them with block grants to states to design their own health care programs. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to round up 50 votes to pass the legislation before Sept. 30, when special rules preventing a Democratic filibuster will expire. "We think this has a very good chance, Obamacare is only getting worse," Trump told reporters covering the U.N.


Prospects for congressional approval of a plan to remove air traffic control operations from the government and put industry in charge appear slim
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump has made airlines' longtime goal of privatizing air traffic control a key part of his agenda to boost America's infrastructure. But his prospects for closing the deal with Congress appear slim. A House bill that would put the aviation industry in charge of air traffic control has repeatedly stalled and prospects appear even worse in the Senate, where there has been no effort to take up the issue. While the White House and airline lobbyists have pushed for privatization, there has been fierce opposition from private pilots, corporate aircraft owners and others who fear they will have to pay more to use the system and would lose access to busy airports.


A young girl at Yankee Stadium was injured by a 105 mph foul ball off the bat of Todd Frazier during a game against Minnesota, leading some players to call for protective netting to be extended
NEW YORK (AP) - A young girl at Yankee Stadium was injured by a 105 mph foul ball off the bat of Todd Frazier during Wednesday's game against Minnesota, leading some players to call for protective netting to be extended. The Yankees said the girl was taken to a hospital for treatment, and New York manager Joe Girardi said he had been told by team security that she was OK. The game was delayed for about 4 minutes while she was attended to and then carried from the seats in the bottom of the fifth inning. A shaken Frazier crouched with his hands over his face.

   
   

 

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