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AP Top News at 5:03 p.m. EDT

James Bond meets Samuel Colt: Seeking to build a safer gun
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) - Jonathan Mossberg is among a small number of pioneers looking to build a safer gun. But unlike many others, he was in the gun business when he started down that path. His family is renowned for its premier line of shotguns treasured by law enforcement, hunters and the military. Mossberg already has spent more than a decade working to develop - and someday bring to the market - a firearm that the wrong person cannot fire. It is intended to work without fail in the hands of its owner in a life-or-death situation. "We're gun people, so we know when you pick up a gun you want to shoot it," Mossberg said.


From new to old, some of the gun safety features over time
Daytona Beach, Florida-based iGun Technology Corp. has been developing a "smart gun," a firearm that uses a ring with a chip in it to send a signal to a circuit board embedded in the firearm so that only an authorized user can fire the gun. But this isn't the only technology that exists or is being developed. A look at other efforts to build a "smart gun" and earlier efforts at making firearms safer: RFID or RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION Armatix GmbH of Unterfoehring, Germany, has developed a handgun that uses a watch that sends signals to the handgun. The iP1 is a .22-caliber pistol that carries a 10-round magazine.


Protests disband after IS group carries out 2nd Iraq bombing
BAGHDAD (AP) - Anti-government protesters disbanded at least temporarily Sunday from the heavily fortified Green Zone they had stormed a day earlier after the Islamic State group carried out its second major attack in Iraq in as many days - a pair of car bombs that killed more than 30 people. The country's political crisis intensified Saturday when hundreds of supporters of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr tore down walls and poured into the zone that is home to the seat of the Iraqi government and most foreign embassies. Loudspeaker announcements on Sunday evening urged protesters to leave peacefully. When the call came, hundreds calmly packed up and left, carrying flags and overnight bags away with them.


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US once again forced to turn to Russia for help on Syria
GENEVA (AP) - Scrambling to resuscitate a nearly dead truce in Syria, the Obama administration has again been forced to turn to Russia for help, with little hope for the desired U.S. outcome. At stake are thousands of lives and the fate of a feeble peace process essential to the fight against the Islamic State group, and Secretary of State John Kerry has appealed once more to his Russian counterpart for assistance in containing and reducing the violence, particularly around city of Aleppo. "We are talking directly to the Russians, even now," Kerry said on his arrival in Geneva as he began talks with Jordanian Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh.


Longtime chef: Prince fought throat, stomach pains recently
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - On stage, Prince was still captivating audiences at recent performances in Australia and California. He hosted a pop-up party at his Paisley Park studio, and there were few outward signs in his final months that anything was wrong. But off stage, something was different. Prince began wanting meals that were easier to digest and was fighting off waves of sore throats and frequent upset stomachs, the musician's personal chef told The Associated Press. A law enforcement official has told the AP that investigators are looking into whether Prince, who was found dead at his home on April 21, died from an overdose and whether a doctor was prescribing him drugs in the weeks beforehand.


Elephants to perform for final time at Ringling Bros. circus
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) - Elephants will perform for the last time at the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus on Sunday, as the show closes its own chapter on a controversial practice that has entertained audiences since circuses began in America two centuries ago. Six Asian elephants will deliver their final performances in Providence, Rhode Island, and five will perform in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, during several shows on Sunday. The last Providence show will stream live on Facebook and at Ringling.com at 7:45 p.m. Alana Feld, executive vice president of Feld Entertainment, which owns the circus, said the animals will live at its 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida.


South Africa: Rescued lions explore new home in sanctuary
Vaalwater, South Africa (AP) - Lions rescued from circuses in Colombia and Peru and airlifted to South Africa scratched their manes on trees and explored their new territory in the African bush after being released into a sanctuary north of Johannesburg Sunday. One of the 33 lions, a male known as Zeus, let out a mighty roar before stepping out of his cage into an enclosure where he will spend the coming months being monitored by a vet. The lions arrived at the Emoya Big Cat Sanctuary shortly after dawn on Sunday to end a two-day journey from South America. The lions were freed after the use of wild animals in circuses was outlawed in Peru and Colombia.


Train derails in Washington, DC; leaks hazardous chemical
WASHINGTON (AP) - A CSX freight train heading to North Carolina derailed near a Metro stop in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, sending 14 cars off the tracks and spilling hazardous material, officials said. No injuries were reported and no evacuations were ordered. The train derailed about 6:40 a.m. near the Rhode Island Avenue Metro station and one of the cars leaked sodium hydroxide, which is used to produce various household products including paper, soap and detergents, CSX spokeswoman Kristin Seay said. Sodium hydroxide, also known as corrosive lye, is a chemical that can irritate and burn the skin and eyes. CSX said hours later the leak was plugged.


Trade unions hold rallies to mark May Day; clashes in Paris
Trade unions and other groups are staging rallies around the world to mark International Workers Day. A look at some May Day events: FRANCE Fearing France's worker protections are under threat, hundreds of angry youths on the sidelines of a May Day labor rally hurled stones and wood at police in Paris, receiving repeated bursts of tear gas in response. Trade unions, teenagers, pensioners and families held largely peaceful marches Sunday in Paris and cities around the country. The traditional May Day rallies took on greater weight this year as parliament is debating a bill that would allow longer working hours and let companies lay workers off more easily.


Malia Obama to take gap year before entering Harvard in 2017
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama's daughter Malia will take a year off after graduating high school in June before enrolling at Harvard University in 2017, a year later than had been widely expected, the president and his wife said in a long-awaited announcement Sunday. Harvard encourages admitted students to defer for one year to travel, pursue a special project or activity, work or spend time in another meaningful way. The student must not enroll in a program at another college that would grant the student a degree. Malia, who turns 18 in July, is the elder of the Obamas' two daughters.


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