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The Associated Press
AP Top News at 4:10 a.m. EDT

Ruling in travel ban leaves myriad questions unanswered
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court's decision to partially reinstate President Donald Trump's temporary travel ban has left the effort to keep some foreigners out of the United States in a murky middle ground, with unanswered questions and possibly more litigation ahead. The justices ruled Monday in an unsigned opinion they would hold a full hearing on the case in October. In the meantime, the administration can bar travelers from six majority-Muslim countries from the U.S. if they don't have a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship" with someone or some entity in the country. It's unclear what will ultimately constitute a "bona fide relationship," though the ruling suggested that an American job, school enrollment or a close relative could meet that threshold.


These senators will make or break the GOP's health care push
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's campaign promise to repeal and replace "Obamacare" is now in the hands of a key group of GOP senators who are opposing -or not yet supporting - legislation Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is pushing to bring to a vote this week. These lawmakers range from moderate to conservative Republicans, and include senators who were just re-elected and a couple facing tough re-election fights. Their concerns about the legislation vary along with their ideology, from those who say it's overly punitive in ejecting people from the insurance rolls, to others who say it doesn't go far enough in dismantling former President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.


Medicaid mission creep threatens GOP's 'Obamacare' repeal
WASHINGTON (AP) - Somewhere along the way, the Republican crusade to repeal "Obamacare" also turned into an effort to limit the future growth of Medicaid. That bit of mission creep is complicating prospects for the GOP, and could lead to deadlock. The federal-state program for low-income people has long been stigmatized as substandard. But over time it has grown and changed to become a mainstay for hospitals, nursing homes, insurers, and now drug treatment centers confronting the opioid epidemic. With about 70 million enrolled, Medicaid covers more people than Medicare, from newborns to nursing home residents. Republicans including Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Dean Heller of Nevada, and Govs.


White House warns Syria's Assad against chemical attack
WASHINGTON (AP) - The White House issued a stern warning to Syrian President Bashar Assad on Monday night as it claimed "potential" evidence that Syria was preparing for another chemical weapons attack. In an ominous statement issued with no supporting evidence or further explanation, Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the U.S. had "identified potential preparations for another chemical weapons attack by the Assad regime that would likely result in the mass murder of civilians, including innocent children." He said the activities were similar to preparations taken before an April 2017 attack that killed dozens of men, women and children, and warned that if "Mr.


Inmate details 4 prison killings: 'I did it for nothing'
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - One by one, Denver Simmons recalled, he and his partner lured inmates into his cell. William Scruggs was promised cookies in exchange for doing some laundry; Jimmy Ham thought he was coming to snort some crushed pills. Over the course of about a half-hour, four men accepted Simmons' hospitality. None of them made it out alive. Calmly, matter-of-factly, the 35-year-old inmate told The Associated Press how he and Jacob Philip strangled and beat their blockmates to death and hid their bodies to avoid spooking the next victims. They had nothing against the men; one of them was even a friend, Simmons admitted.


What's next for Brazil's Temer following corruption charge?
SAO PAULO (AP) - Embattled in Congress and unpopular on the streets, President Michel Temer has now been charged with corruption by Brazil's top prosecutor in the wake of a plea bargain signed by executives of meatpacking company JBS. It is the first time that a sitting Brazilian president has been charged, but Temer has pledged to stay in office. In less than two months, he could be suspended from office, raising even more doubts about Brazil's future until October 2018 general elections. Here are the next steps in Temer's case: CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES After the formal accusation by Attorney Rodrigo Janot, the chief justice on Brazil's top court, Carmen Lucia, will request that the Chamber of Deputies authorize or reject the opening of proceedings against the president.


Saudi demolition of historic Shiite homes stokes violence
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) - Saudi Arabia is demolishing centuries-old homes in a Shiite town, leveling a historic district that officials say has become a hideout for local militants. The destruction has sparked shootouts in the streets between Saudi security forces and Shiite gunmen and stoked sectarian tensions that resonate around the region. The violence in the Shiite town of al-Awamiya, which is centered in the Sunni kingdom's oil-rich east coast, adds a new source of instability at a time of increasing confrontation in the Gulf. Tensions between Saudi Arabia and its Shiite-led rival Iran have spiked in recent weeks. Also, Saudi Arabia and its allies severed ties with neighboring Qatar, demanding among other things that it cut off ties with Iran.


Cosby venue could move to California in sex abuse lawsuit
SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AP) - The stage for Bill Cosby's next legal challenge shifts to California with a hearing scheduled Tuesday to set a trial date in a lawsuit accusing him of sexually assaulting a teen at the Playboy Mansion more than 40 years ago. Judy Huth accused the comedian of forcing her to perform a sex act on him in a bedroom at the mansion around 1974 when she was 15. The hearing comes less than two weeks after a Pennsylvania jury deadlocked on criminal charges against Cosby. A mistrial was declared June 17 on charges Cosby drugged and molested Andrea Constand, the former Temple University director of women's basketball, at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004.


Questions raised about Liu Xiaobo's prison medical treatment
SHENYANG, China (AP) - As recently as February, Liu Xiaobo's brother dismissed reports that the Nobel Peace laureate might be ill in prison. Then came the bombshell Monday that Liu has been diagnosed with late-stage liver cancer and released on medical parole. A brief video has also emerged of Liu's wife tearfully telling a friend that no treatment - surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy - would work for Liu at this point. The news has shocked and angered Liu's supporters and human rights advocates, who are questioning if China's best-known political prisoner received inadequate care while incarcerated, or whether the authoritarian government deliberately allowed the 61-year-old to wither in prison.


U2 bassist thanks band for helping him through addiction
NEW YORK (AP) - In a frank and heartfelt speech, U2 bassist Adam Clayton thanked his bandmates of four decades for their support during his treatment and recovery for alcohol abuse years ago, and then joined them for a rollicking rendition of a few hits. "We have a pact with each other," said Clayton, 57, who was receiving an award from MusiCares, the charity arm of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. "In our band, no one will be a casualty. We all come home, or none of us come home. No one will be left behind. Thank you for honoring that promise, and letting me be in your band."