Top Stories

Aug 28, 11:29 PM EDT

Rescuers seek survivors of China landslide

AP Photo
AP Photo
World Video

Multimedia
Video photo gallery on trash in China
China celebrates 60th year
Panorama of Tiananmen Square
Remembering Tiananmen
A year after China quake
Migrant laborers struggle to find work
Checking Beijing's Air
China's morning exercises in parks
Exploring Chinese Cuisine
Beijing Architecture Changes For Games
Woman Rescues Homeless Quake Dogs
China Holds Funeral for Panda
China's 1-child Policy Causes Extra Pain
Map of Earthquake Zone in Central China
Entrepreneurs Move Into, Out of China
Olypmics in Beijing Highlight China's Water Woes
Foreign Buyers Head to China Despite Problems
Coal Use Produces Pollution, Illness
Coal Means Profit, Woes for China
China Extending Its Reach Around the World
In China, the Desert Closes In
Latest News
Tight security, unity drive clash in China's west

China's top leaders remember victory over Japan

3 Chinese inmates kill guard, break out of jail

Report: Water shortages crimp China shale gas plan

3 children killed in knife attack at China school

Buy AP Photo Reprints
Audio Slideshow
Panorama of Tiananmen Square
Remembering Tiananmen

BEIJING (AP) -- Hundreds of rescuers hunted Friday for survivors of a massive landslide in southwestern China that killed at least 14 people.

More than 600 members of specialized search and rescue teams were working in a pair of destroyed villages in Guizhou provinces, state media reported. They came equipped with electronic devices to detect signs of life, as well as backhoes and other specialized equipment, the reports said.

Another 11 people were still missing and 22 left injured from the collapse of a mountainside on Wednesday night following three days of heavy rain.

The official Xinhua News Agency said 77 houses collapsed or were buried in the landslide. The breaching of a small reservoir during the landslide also caused flooding that covered houses up to their roofs.

State-run China National Radio cited villagers saying they had complained for years to authorities about weakening of the mountainside caused by past mining operations.

Unrestricted mining and quarrying is frequently blamed for causing landslides in China's remote, mountainous southwestern provinces.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

  • 490 First Avenue South
  • St. Petersburg, FL 33701
  • 727-893-8111