Nation & World

Jul 21, 5:18 AM EDT

N. Korea: No interest in something like Iranian nuclear deal


Buy AP Photo Reprints
Multimedia
Swift negotiations free U.S. journalists
Timeline of U.S.-North Korea relations
Timeline of North Korea's nuclear and missile programs
Depth of Field: North Korea
A look at Kim Jong Il
Truth emerges about Kim Soo-im
Commission: U.S. military killed Korean refugees
South Koreans Protest U.S. Beef Accord
S. Korea Women Keep Diving Tradition Alive
Bittersweet Homecoming: Koreans Return Home After 68 Years in Russia
Latest News
For North Korea, Iran-style nuclear deal not an option

Malibu it's not, but North Korea seen as possible surf spot

North Korea official says not interested in Iran-style deal

With warning to US, North Korea marks end of Korean War

S. Korea man arrested over alleged death threat on US envoy

Interactives
Nuclear plants that have leaked tritium
Not enough money to close old nuclear plants
How a nuclear power plant works
Latest News
Russian Orthodox Church pushes for control over St. Isaac's

Russia's central bank cuts key interest rate

AP PHOTOS: New Russian Army store opens in Moscow

FSB: US, Georgia helped prevent attacks at Sochi Olympics

Russia to upgrade air defense missiles intended for Iran

Sepp Blatter deserves the Nobel Prize, Vladimir Putin says

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- North Korea said Tuesday that it's not interested in an Iran-type nuclear disarmament deal, saying it won't abandon its atomic weapons as long as the United States maintains hostile policies toward the country.

The North's nuclear deterrent is "not a plaything to be put on the negotiating table," an unidentified Foreign Ministry spokesman said in a statement carried by the official Korean Central News Agency. It was the country's first official response to the Iran nuclear accord reached earlier this month.

North Korea's nuclear program is a major regional concern, with the country having conducted atomic weapons tests in 2006, 2009 and 2013. International nuclear disarmament talks have been stalled since early 2009, and outside analysts believe the North has built a small but growing nuclear bomb arsenal.

The Foreign Ministry spokesman said North Korea is different from Iran because it already has nuclear weapons. He said the North faces constant military and nuclear threats from the U.S., citing its regular military exercises with South Korea.

North Korea "is not interested at all in the dialogue to discuss the issue of making it freeze or dismantle its nukes unilaterally first," he said, adding that the North "remains unchanged in the mission of its nuclear force as long as the U.S. continues pursuing its hostile policy toward" the country.

The U.S. stations about 28,500 troops in South Korea as deterrence against potential aggression from North Korea, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty.

Under the Iranian nuclear deal reached by Tehran, Washington and others, Iran's nuclear program will be curbed for a decade in exchange for potentially hundreds of billions of dollars' worth of relief from international sanctions. Many key penalties on the Iranian economy, such as those related to the energy and financial sectors, could be lifted by the end of the year.

© 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

advertisement

NEWSLETTER

Sign up today for the latest headlines from U.S. News and World Report delivered to you free.

RSS FEEDS

Personalize your U.S. News with our feeds of blogs and breaking news headlines.

USNews MOBILE

U.S. News daily briefings are also available on your mobile device.

advertisement