Mar 1, 11:46 AM EST

Germany trusts Greece to fulfill bailout terms

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BERLIN (AP) -- Germany's finance minister said Sunday that he trusts Greece's current government to fulfill the conditions for the bailout deal, but also made clear the country would not receive any further money if it didn't.

Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble told German newspaper Bild am Sonntag that "I trust them to implement the needed measures ... and to ultimately fulfill its obligations."

At the same time, Schaeuble warned that if Greece did not fulfill the demands laid out by the eurozone finance ministers in a four-month bailout plan, "there will be no more aid."

He also said it remains to be seen whether Greece needs more aid after the end of the current bailout plan, adding that "no matter what's going to happen, we will set very strict standards."

In a different interview Sunday afternoon with German public TV ARD, Schaeuble rejected the notion that Germany is at fault for the "problems from which the people in Greece have to suffer."

"Those who are at fault are those who were responsible for decades in Greece," Schauble said.

Germany's Parliament overwhelmingly approved the four-month extension of Greece's financial bailout on Friday, despite unease over the new government in Athens.

Last week, Greece won a four-month extension to its 240 billion-euro ($270 billion) international loan agreement earlier this month in a deal with the other members of the 19-nation eurozone. In return, Athens has pledged a series of budget reforms, which for now contain no details but will have to be turned into concrete measures by April.

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