AP Radio AP Radio News:

May 18, 2:02 PM EDT

Siberian tiger that terrified Vladivostok gets new wild home


Multimedia
Tiger Woods' life with Elin
A look at Tiger Woods' troubled marriage.
How they apologize
911 call from Tiger Woods' home seeking help for his mother-in-law.
PDF copy of portion of Tiger Woods' crash report.
Latest News
Barred by Russian TV, Navalny creates YouTube revolution

Russia: Islamic State group 'prepared attacks' in Moscow

Editor shot dead in Russia's Siberia

US official urges vigilance over Russia's role in Balkans

Russian defense minister boasts about arms upgrade

Putin sits down at piano in China, plays Soviet songs

Audio
Excerpts of a 911 call from one of the men mauled by a tiger at SF Zoo (MP3)
A Former Zookeeper on Animal Escapes
Multimedia
Russia Celebrates Summer Solstice
Interactive
AP's Athlete of the Decade

MOSCOW (AP) -- A Siberian tiger that terrorized Russia's Far East city of Vladivostok by prowling its suburbs has been relocated to a vast Russian national park where officials hope he will thrive.

The tiger, nicknamed Vladik, was captured in October on the edge of Vladivostok. He flown by helicopter Monday to Bikin National Park, 500 kilometers (350 miles) further north.

Russia has declared Siberian, or Amur, tigers a protected species. Only about 540 are estimated to live in the wild.

World Wildlife Fund video shows the tiger appearing initially bewildered when his cage was opened. But he then leapt out with a growl, ran around the space where the helicopter landed and disappeared into the woods.

Pavel Fomenko of WWF says Vladik "has little chance of wandering into urban jungles again."

---

A previous version of this story said the number of tigers in the wild is estimated at 54.

© 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.