Mount Vernon News
 
Feb 12, 2:15 PM EST

Libya's air force chief of staff says a fighter jet was shot down while carrying out airstrikes against Islamic militants, the third jet to be downed in nearly 40 days



Interactive
Inside Libya
Interactives
Libya's air force chief of staff says a fighter jet was shot down while carrying out airstrikes against Islamic militants, the third jet to be downed in nearly 40 days

The Pentagon seeks $200 million in the 2017 budget for counterterrorism operations in Libya and elsewhere in North and West Africa, but Defense Secretary Ash Carter says Libyans must take the lead in eliminating the Islamic State threat in their country

The Obama administration is struggling to find the right mix of military and diplomatic moves to stop the Islamic State in Libya

The EU is urging Libya's factions to support a broad-based unity government or face the prospect of more chaos

Buy AP Photo Reprints
Multimedia
Libya Opening Doors to Tourists

BENGHAZI, Libya (AP) -- Libya's air force chief of staff says a fighter jet was shot down while carrying out airstrikes against Islamic militants, the third jet to be downed in nearly 40 days.

Brig. Gen. Saqr al-Jaroushi told The Associated Press that a Libyan MIG32 came under fire by militants' anti-aircraft guns in the eastern city of Benghazi on Friday. He says the pilot ejected and landed safely. The pilot has been rescued before in a similar incident on Jan. 4.

Al-Jaroushi said army is investigating whether "terrorists have acquired new weapons capable of shooting down our planes."

The air force answers to the internationally-recognized government in eastern Libya, where forces have been fighting Islamic militants since 2014. In western Libya a rival parliament, backed by Islamist-allied militias, is in control.

© 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

 


© Copyright 2015 Progressive Communications. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed, without the expressed permission of Progressive Communications.