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Dec 7, 12:27 PM EST

Border crossings start to rise in spite of 'Trump effect'


AP Photo
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Multimedia
Summer on the northern border
Border Patrol horses
Multimedia
Border fence transforms the landscape
Unmanned Drones Used to Patrol Border
Travelers React to New Border Security Rules
Flier Outlining New Border Identification Rules (01/31/08)
Interview with Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff

MISSION, Texas (AP) -- The election of President Donald Trump contributed to a dramatic downturn in migration.

That caused the number of arrests at the border to hit an all-time low earlier this year, helping the U.S. end the 2017 fiscal year at a 45-year low.

But since bottoming out in April, the number of immigrants caught at the southern border increased monthly.

Border Patrol agents interviewed by The Associated Press say they expect numbers to keep rising. They say that's a sign that families in Central America are testing the Trump administration.

But experts who closely follow migration patterns say any drop-off was bound to be temporary as long as the countries that most people are fleeing remain ravaged by shootings and gang violence.

Those countries include El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

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