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Nov 30, 6:13 PM EST

The Latest: American captured in Syria has asked for lawyer


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WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Latest on a captured American citizen accused of fighting with the Islamic State (all times local):

6:10 p.m.

The U.S. government is acknowledging that it has detained an American citizen accused of fighting with the Islamic State for more than two months without fulfilling his request to see a lawyer.

In response to a court order, the government said Thursday that the unidentified man picked up on the Syrian battlefield said he was willing to talk to FBI agents but "felt he should have an attorney present."

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a court petition to provide legal counsel to the detainee, saying he is being held in Iraq in a legal "black hole" without access to counsel.

The government is contesting the ACLU's standing in the case.

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1:15 p.m.

A federal judge is giving the U.S. government until 5 p.m. to say whether an American citizen accused of fighting with the Islamic State has been told of his constitutional rights. The judge also wants to know if he's asked for a lawyer.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan grew impatient Thursday when a government lawyer would not answer the questions about the individual picked up on the Syrian battlefield and detained in Iraq for more than two months.

The American Civil Liberties Union is challenging his detention and wants to provide him legal counsel.

The government lawyer repeatedly declined to answer the judge's questions and argued that the U.S. military is still trying to ascertain what to do with him.

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