AP Radio AP Radio News:

Apr 21, 1:17 PM EDT

AP FACT CHECK: Gorsuch, SCOTUS didn't ban teaching of Islam


Multimedia
Mass. Catholics hold vigil in endangered churches
Convent shuts after helping generations 'overcome'
Inside a Voodoo Gede ceremony
Religion News
Lawmakers: Faith-based adoption groups can spurn gay couples

Court awards 3M euros to Hungary church stripped of status

Pope tells Egypt ahead of visit he comes as peace messenger

Pope pays to rent beach space for disabled youths

Philippines: Malaysian, 3 Indonesians among slain militants

Judge: Suspect in California school killings fit for trial

Pope comforts sister of French priest slain by extremists

Charleston church shooter on federal death row in Indiana

Church pastor where 9 were killed blasts political ad

The Latest: Candidate won't pull ad that angered pastor

Interactives
Video: The Struggle for Islam

Understanding Islam

Related Stories
Who speaks for Islam and reform? Debate heats up in Egypt

The Latest: San Diego school official sees Muslim bullying

Bond set for man accused of threats at anti-Islam event

San Diego schools launches effort against Islamophobia

Emirati in Islamic State group gets 10-year prison sentence

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Newly sworn in Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch didn't cast the deciding vote in a case on Islam in public schools, despite the claims of several widely shared stories. The high court has issued no such opinion in the days since Gorsuch has joined its bench.

The stories shared by several right-leaning viral content sites, including Conservative World Daily and We Conservative, say the nine justices met and voted 5-4 in favor of allowing schools to only teach the history of Islamic terrorism. It also says Gorsuch advocated that "standard Judeo-Christianity" should be the only religion taught.

The court's website shows no such opinion being released since Gorsuch joined the court.

Gorsuch was sworn in as a justice on April 10.

© 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.