The Latest: Official: Mail voting won’t mean faster results

HONOLULU (AP) — The Latest on Hawaii’s shift to voting by mail in the 2020 elections (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

Elections officials are warning that shifting to voting by mail won’t mean that Hawaii election results will be available sooner.

Honolulu County Clerk Glen Takahashi told lawmakers at a briefing on Wednesday that it’s going to take some time to process votes dropped off in ballot deposit boxes on election day.

He says it may be unrealistic to expect final results by the 10 p.m. news or midnight. He says processing ballots may take into the morning.

Gov. David Ige earlier this year signed legislation instituting voting by mail across all counties beginning with the 2020 primary election on Aug. 8.

Hawaii is the fourth state to shift to all-mail elections. Oregon was the first in 2000, followed by Washington state and Colorado.

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9:40 a.m.

Hawaii election officials are scheduled to brief lawmakers about next year’s start of all-mail voting.

Clerks from each of the state’s four major counties are expected to speak at the state Capitol on Wednesday, along with Chief Election Officer Scott Nago.

Gov. David Ige earlier this year signed legislation instituting voting by mail across all counties beginning with the 2020 primary election on Aug. 8.

Hawaii is the fourth state to shift to all-mail elections. Oregon was the first in 2000, followed by Washington state and Colorado.

The new law calls for some voter service centers where people may drop off their mail-in ballots or cast their ballots in person if they choose. The centers will be open starting ten business days before the election.

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