Louisiana High Court To Rule On Mayor's Reelection Bid

FILE - Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins, a Democrat, signs the registration book as he qualified for the U.S. Senate race, on July 23, 2020, in Baton Rouge, La. Louisiana law does not require that a candidate who mistakenly fills in the wrong address on a qualification form must be tossed off the ballot, a lawyer for Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins told the Louisiana Supreme Court on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte, File)
FILE - Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins, a Democrat, signs the registration book as he qualified for the U.S. Senate race, on July 23, 2020, in Baton Rouge, La. Louisiana law does not require that a candidate who mistakenly fills in the wrong address on a qualification form must be tossed off the ballot, a lawyer for Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins told the Louisiana Supreme Court on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte, File)

SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) — Louisiana law does not require that a candidate who mistakenly fills in the wrong address on a qualification form must be tossed off the ballot, a lawyer for Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins told the Louisiana Supreme Court on Tuesday.

A lawsuit says Perkins did not use the address where he claims a homestead tax exemption when he signed up to run for reelection, as the law requires. He used another address for a residence he owns in the city.

Perkins has acknowledged the mistake and none of the seven justices Tuesday accused him of perjury. The case involves the question of whether “there are some things that a candidate does not have to tell the truth about," Justice Jay McCallum said as he questioned Perkins' attorney, Scott Bickford.

Bickford said state law does not specifically call for disqualifying a candidate for using the wrong address. Jerry Harper, attorney for plaintiff Francis Deal, said the use of false information on the sign-up form for the Nov. 8 election — information the candidate swears to be true — disqualifies Perkins, who wants to run for a second term.

Justice Scott Crichton at one point suggested that allowing Perkins on the ballot would be tantamount to nullifying the law.

It was unclear when the justices would rule. So far, a district judge and an appellate court have ruled against Perkins.