Latest Courts News

Members of the media set up outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Manhattan district attorney can obtain Trump tax returns while not allowing Congress to get Trump tax and financial records, for now, returning the case to lower courts. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A look at the cases behind the Supreme Court rulings

Jul. 11, 2020 12:17 AM EDT

The Supreme Court ruled in two cases involving access to President Donald Trump’s financial records. The cases were the last to be released of the high court’s term, which dragged into July because of the coronavirus pandemic. One case had to do with whether Congress could get access to...

Two people walk down the steps outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Thomas spoke, Roberts ruled in unusual Supreme Court term

Jul. 11, 2020 12:15 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Clarence Thomas spoke and Chief Justice John Roberts ruled. The Supreme Court's most unusual term featured victories for immigrants, abortion rights, LGBTQ workers and religious freedoms. The usually quiet Thomas' baritone was heard by the whole world when the coronavirus outbreak...

FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2020, file photo, the U.S. Capitol is seen at sunrise in Washington. President Donald Trump isn’t just changing the presidency during his first term in office. He’s also changing Congress.
More than perhaps any president in modern history, Trump has been willing to ignore, defy and toy with the legislative branch, asserting power and breaking norms in ways his predecessors would never dare.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

It's not just the presidency: Trump is changing the Congress

Jul. 11, 2020 12:13 AM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump isn’t just changing the presidency during his first term in office. He’s also changing Congress. More than perhaps any president in modern history, Trump has been willing to ignore, defy and toy with the legislative branch, asserting power and breaking norms in...

Workers in protective suits administer coronavirus tests at a COVID-19 testing site for those who were potentially exposed to the coronavirus at a wholesale food market in Beijing, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. As the number of cases of COVID-19 in Beijing climbed in recent days following an outbreak linked to a wholesale food market, officials announced they had identified hundreds of thousands of people who needed to be tested for the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

The Latest: China rejects food imports after virus detected

Jul. 10, 2020 10:47 PM EDT

BEIJING — New coronavirus cases have dropped sharply in China, and authorities are turning their attention to concerns that the virus could spread through imported food. Those worries have risen since a June outbreak in Beijing that was linked to the city’s largest wholesale market. Testing has...

Two people walk down the steps outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Thomas spoke, Roberts ruled in unusual Supreme Court term

Jul. 10, 2020 10:38 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Clarence Thomas spoke and Chief Justice John Roberts ruled. The Supreme Court's most unusual term featured victories for immigrants, abortion rights, LGBTQ workers and religious freedoms. The usually quiet Thomas' baritone was heard by the whole world when the coronavirus outbreak...

Washington justices void 1916 tribal rights ruling as racist

Jul. 10, 2020 9:19 PM EDT

SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state's Supreme Court on Friday vacated a 1916 ruling that allowed a prosecutor to bring criminal charges against a tribal fisherman as racist and unjust. The justices unanimously said they were compelled to void the decision, even though it was overruled in 1957, because...

FILE - In this Oct. 31 1997 file photo Danny Lee waits for his arraignment hearing for murder in the Pope County Detention Center in Russellville, Ark. A federal judge in Indiana on Friday, July, 10, 2020, halted the first federal execution planned in 17 years scheduled three days from now over COVID-19 concerns. Daniel Lee had been scheduled to die by lethal injection. Lee, 47, of Yukon, Okla., was convicted of the 1996 killings of gun dealer William Mueller, his wife, Nancy, and her 8-year-old daughter, Sarah Powell. (Dan Pierce/The Courier via AP, File)

US appeals to proceed with 1st federal execution in 17 years

Jul. 10, 2020 7:37 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Determined to proceed with the first federal execution in nearly two decades, the Justice Department plans to appeal a judge’s ruling that would halt authorities from carrying it out on Monday. The family of the victims in the case had requested that it be called off because their...

Alaska judge declines to block virus aid to businesses

Jul. 10, 2020 6:28 PM EDT

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A state court judge Friday denied a Juneau man's request to block distribution of federal coronavirus relief aid under expanded rules proposed by Gov. Mike Dunleavy's administration. Superior Court Judge Philip Pallenberg ruled Eric Forrer had not shown a “clear probability of...

Masking order blocked by state judge in Louisiana city

Jul. 10, 2020 6:24 PM EDT

SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) — A state judge on Friday blocked a northwest Louisiana city from enforcing a masking requirement recently issued by the mayor in hopes of fighting the spread of the new coronavirus. The restraining order was issued by state District Judge Craig Marcotte in a lawsuit filed by five...

Justice Department files emergency appeal after federal judge halts first federal execution in nearly 2 decades

Jul. 10, 2020 6:18 PM EDT
WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Department files emergency appeal after federal judge halts first federal execution in nearly 2 decades.