Latest Glaciology News

FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2017, file photo, Pete Frates, right, who inspired the ice bucket challenge, looks at his wife Julie during a ceremony at City Hall in Boston by Boston Mayor Marty Walsh declaring the day the Pete Frates Day. Frates, who was stricken with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, died Monday, Dec. 9, 2019. He was 34. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes, File)

Ice bucket challenge inspiration Pete Frates dies at 34

Dec. 9, 2019 5:00 PM EST

BOSTON (AP) — Pete Frates, a former college baseball player whose battle with Lou Gehrig’s disease helped inspire the ALS ice bucket challenge that has raised more than $200 million worldwide, died Monday. He was 34. Frates died peacefully, surrounded by his family, they said in a statement....

Man with Lou Gehrig’s disease who helped popularize ice bucket challenge, raising millions for ALS research, dies at 34

Dec. 9, 2019 2:03 PM EST
BOSTON (AP) — Man with Lou Gehrig’s disease who helped popularize ice bucket challenge, raising millions for ALS research, dies at 34.
FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2019, file photo, a firefighter battles the Maria Fire in Somis, Calif. Since leaders first started talking about tackling the problem of climate change, the world has spewed more heat-trapping gases, gotten hotter and suffered hundreds of extreme weather disasters. Fires have burned, ice has melted and seas have grown. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, Fire)

Warming toll: 1 degree hotter, trillions of tons of ice gone

Dec. 1, 2019 5:06 AM EST

Since leaders first started talking about tackling the problem of climate change, the world has spewed more heat-trapping gases, gotten hotter and suffered hundreds of extreme weather disasters. Fires have burned, ice has melted and seas have grown. The first United Nations diplomatic conference to tackle climate...

This Jan. 5, 2010, photo provided by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in Utqiagvik, Alaska, shows a functioning ice cellar, a type of underground food cache dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Mike Brubaker/Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium via AP)

Failing ice cellars signal changes in Alaska whaling towns

Nov. 25, 2019 5:30 PM EST

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their whale and walrus meat to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath these...