Latest Zoology News

In this Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020, photo, Norm Bishop sits inside his home with a photo and award from his years of working with wolves, outside Bozeman, Mont. Bishop, who was Yellowstone’s resource interpreter, had spent years giving public presentations about the science of wolf reintroduction. He would explain what the experts thought would happen if gray wolves were restored to the Yellowstone ecosystem. (Ryan Berry/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP)

Wolves' return to Yellowstone recalled on 25th anniversary

Jan. 19, 2020 11:55 AM EST

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — The day the wolves arrived in Yellowstone National Park was busy. At least that’s how Norm Bishop remembers it. The wolves came in aluminum crates on horse trailers Jan. 12, 1995. Passing through the gates, the Canadian-born carnivores were the first of their kind in the park...

Migration routes are an energy, environmental balancing act

Jan. 19, 2020 11:50 AM EST

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — It’s 35 degrees outside. About nine mule deer shuffle through the bitter waters of Fremont Lake. A buck shakes, sending droplets of water flying. He pauses to look back at the herd trailing behind him and then trudges ahead, taking another step along a 150-mile journey to his...

Maine biologist to begin capturing, collaring 130 moose

Jan. 5, 2020 11:07 AM EST

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife biologists are getting ready to round up some moose. Starting in the coming week, biologists will be capturing and collaring 130 moose as Maine’s moose survival study enters its sixth year and focuses on a new study area. The...

Hawaii officials want to deploy wasp to protect native trees

Dec. 31, 2019 10:17 AM EST

WAILUKU, Hawaii (AP) — Hawaii officials want to deploy a wasp throughout the state to combat another type of wasp that threatens a species of native trees. A biological control plan issued by the state Department of Agriculture and Department of Land & Natural Resources calls for the use of wasps named...

In a Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019 photo, Robert T. Brown, right, president of the Maryland Waterman's Association, dredges for oysters with Matt Bernd on the Chesapeake Bay near Ridge, Md. A study estimated market-sized oysters dropped from 600 million in 1999 to about 300 million in the Maryland portion of the bay in 2018. (AP Photo/Brian Witte)

Chesapeake Bay oysters get more attention at pivotal time

Dec. 23, 2019 11:53 AM EST

RIDGE, Md. (AP) — Robert T. Brown pulled an oyster shell from a pile freshly harvested by a dredger from the Chesapeake Bay and talked enthusiastically about the larvae attached — a sign of a future generation critical to the health of the nation's largest estuary. On an overcast November morning,...

In this May 23, 1956 photo, a net is placed over a baby's crib to protect them against mosquitoes in St. Petersburg, Fla. Dengue and yellow fever epidemics slammed Florida in the 1700s. According to Gordon Patterson, a professor at the Florida Institute of Technology and an expert on the history of mosquitoes in Florida, in the last 20 years of the century, disease-harboring mosquitoes killed more human beings than any other animal on this planet.  (George Travant/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

'Pest hellhole': Inside Florida’s itchy war on mosquitoes

Dec. 22, 2019 12:46 PM EST

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Battling the winged beasts before modern methods wasn’t easy. Desperate early Floridians tried everything, from slathering their bodies in lumps of bear fat to burning oily rags. Indigenous people avoided mangrove trees, where mosquitoes breed in the summertime, and used nets to...

FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2010, file photo, Bart Siegel of New Orleans looks through binoculars for birds during the National Audubon Society's annual Christmas bird count on the Gulf Coast in Grand Isle, La. It's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. And the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. (AP Photo/Sean Gardner, File)

Audubon's annual Christmas Bird Count stronger than ever

Dec. 16, 2019 11:02 AM EST

Ít's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. Today, the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. “He realized that we were...

This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)

Science Says: Diet plays big role in how huge whales can get

Dec. 14, 2019 9:10 AM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach sensors...

FILE - This Oct. 6, 2016, file photo shows an exterior of the Javits Center during the first day of New York Comic Con. New York City lawmakers are poised to adopt legislation requiring “bird-friendly” glass on all new construction to cut down on the tens of thousands of birds who die flying into the city's buildings every year. (AP Photo/Steve Luciano, File)

NYC set to require 'bird-friendly' glass on new construction

Dec. 7, 2019 11:39 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — New York City lawmakers are poised to adopt legislation requiring “bird-friendly” glass on all new construction in an effort to cut down on the tens of thousands of birds who die flying into the city's buildings every year. New York will be the largest city in the nation to...

FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

Lobster catch headed for decline, not crash, scientists say

Dec. 1, 2019 1:51 PM EST

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds (32...