Latest Science News

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine acknowledges members of the media while entering his residence after testing positive for COVID-19 earlier in the day Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Bexley, Ohio.  DeWine tested positive using a rapid test Thursday, before testing negative later in the day using a more sensitive laboratory-developed test.  No test for coronavirus infection is perfect, and test results can be affected by a variety of factors, including the type of test used, the quality of the sample and when it was taken during the course of any infection. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Ohio governor’s COVID-19 results show tests imperfections

Aug. 7, 2020 2:43 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine's positive-then-negative test results for the coronavirus are a reminder that no test is definitive. The governor tested positive using a rapid test Thursday, before testing negative later in the day using a more sensitive laboratory-developed test. He was tested...

FILE - In this May 1, 2013, file photo, Carmen Blandin Tarleton speaks at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston following a face transplant. In February 2007 her estranged husband doused her with industrial strength lye, burning more than 80 percent of her body. In July 2020, Tarleton became the first American and only the second person globally to undergo a second face transplant procedure after her first transplant failed. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

AP Exclusive: Woman is 1st in US to get 2nd face transplant

Aug. 7, 2020 2:40 PM EDT

BOSTON (AP) — For the second time in a decade, a New Hampshire woman has a new face. Carmen Blandin Tarleton, whose face was disfigured in an attack by her ex-husband, became the first American and only the second person globally to undergo the procedure after her first transplant began to fail six years...

FILE - In this July 23, 2020 file photo, health care workers prepare a COVID-19 test sample before a person self-administered a test at the COVID-19 drive-thru testing center at Miami-Dade County Auditorium in Miami.  Racial disparities in the the U.S. coronavirus epidemic extend to children, according to two sobering government reports released Friday, Aug. 7.  One of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports looked at hospitalizations of children with COVID-19. Hispanic children were hospitalized at a rate eight times higher than white kids, and Black children were hospitalized at a rate five times higher, it found.(David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP)

US reports show racial disparities in kids with COVID-19

Aug. 7, 2020 2:33 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — Racial disparities in the the U.S. coronavirus epidemic extend to children, according to two sobering government reports released Friday. One of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports looked children with COVID-19 who needed hospitalization. Hispanic children were...

FILE - In this July 9, 2020, file photo California Gov. Gavin Newsom visits the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection's McClellan Reload Base in Sacramento, Calif. As Newsom unveiled details for California elementary schools seeking to reopen with in-person instruction amid the coronavirus pandemic, one of the state's two powerful teachers unions warned that reopening schools would be

The Latest: California tops 10,000 virus deaths, 3rd highest

Aug. 7, 2020 1:40 PM EDT

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California has surpassed 10,000 deaths from the coronavirus, making it the U.S. state with the third-highest deaths since the start of the pandemic. The figure was reported Friday by Johns Hopkins University, with 10,024 dead since the outbreak began in California in February. New...

In this photo made from footage provided by the Russian Defense Ministry on Wednesday, July 15, 2020, medical workers in protective gear prepare to draw blood from volunteers participating in a trial of a coronavirus vaccine at the Budenko Main Military Hospital outside Moscow, Russia. Russia is boasting that it’s about to be the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, but scientists worldwide are sounding the alarm that the headlong rush could backfire. (Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP)

Russia's race for virus vaccine raises concerns in the West

Aug. 7, 2020 7:11 AM EDT

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia boasts that it’s about to become the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, with mass vaccinations planned as early as October using shots that are yet to complete clinical trials -- and scientists worldwide are sounding the alarm that the headlong rush could backfire....

Mendy McNulty swabs the nose of her son, Andrew, 7, Tuesday, July 28, 2020, in their home in Mount Juliet, Tenn. Six thousand U.S. parents and kids are swabbing their noses twice a week to answer some of the most vexing mysteries about the coronavirus. The answers could help determine the safety of in-class education during the pandemic. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

US kids, parents perform DIY tests for coronavirus science

Aug. 7, 2020 5:42 AM EDT

In a comfy suburb just outside Nashville, a young family swabs their noses twice a month in a DIY study seeking answers to some of the most vexing questions about the coronavirus. How many U.S. children and teens are infected? How many kids who are infected show no symptoms? How likely are they to spread it to...

Cemetery workers bury 65-year-old Maria Joana Nascimento, whose family members, behind, suspect died of COVID-19, at Vila Formosa cemetery in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020. Brazil is nearing 3 million cases of COVID-19 and 100,000 deaths. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

The Latest: UN says cybercrime hindering pandemic response

Aug. 7, 2020 12:00 AM EDT

UNITED NATIONS — The United Nations’ counterterrorism chief says a 350% increase in phishing websites was reported in the first quarter of the year and many of them targeted hospitals and health care systems, hindering their response to the coronavirus pandemic. Vladimir Voronkov told the U.N....

FILE - Boats are piled on each other in the marina following the effects of Hurricane Isaias in Southport, N.C., Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020.  Hurricane season has already been busy this year, but forecasters say it should get even nastier soon. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Thursday, Aug. 6 increased its forecast for the number of named storms, hurricanes and major hurricanes this year to far above normal. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Hurricane Alpha? Amped up season forecast, names may run out

Aug. 6, 2020 12:12 PM EDT

Already smashing records, this year’s hyperactive Atlantic hurricane season is about to get even nastier, forecasters predict. In the coming months, they expect to run out of traditional hurricane names and see about twice as much storm activity as a normal year. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

FILE - In this Nov. 30, 1999, file photo, Seattle police use tear gas to push back World Trade Organization protesters in downtown Seattle. The Associated Press found that there is no government oversight of the manufacture and use of tear gas. Instead, the industry is left to regulate itself. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

Aug. 6, 2020 11:43 AM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water bottles and rocks...

FILE - In this July 26, 2020, file photo, federal officers launch tear gas at demonstrators during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse in Portland, Ore. The Associated Press found that there is no government oversight of the manufacture and use of tear gas. Instead, the industry is left to regulate itself. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Lack of study and oversight raises concerns about tear gas

Aug. 6, 2020 11:41 AM EDT

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On June 2, Justin LaFrancois attended a protest against police violence and racism in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, where he planned to livestream the event for his alternative newspaper’s website. Shortly into the march, police, who reported that water bottles and rocks...