Latest Weapons treaties News

In this Sept. 9, 2020, image provided by the U.S. Air Force, is Marshall Billingslea, special presidential envoy for arms control, center, and National Nuclear Security Administration Administrator Lisa Gordon-Hagerty, right, walking with Air Force personnel between meetings at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M.  The Trump administration has sketched out a framework that it hopes will avoid a three-way arms race as a deadline nears for extending the only remaining nuclear arms control deal with Russia and as China looks to expand its nuclear forces.  (Todd R. Berenger/U.S. Air Force, via AP)

Ambassador: Time is right for new arms control agreement

Sep. 16, 2020 6:08 PM EDT

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Trump administration has sketched out a framework that it hopes will avoid a three-way arms race as a deadline nears for extending the only remaining nuclear arms control deal with Russia and as China looks to expand its nuclear forces. Ambassador Marshall Billingslea, the...

US reaches milestone in destroying mustard agent in Colorado

Sep. 8, 2020 6:23 PM EDT

PUEBLO, Colo. (AP) — The Army says it has reached a milestone at a Colorado chemical weapons depot by destroying nearly 300,000 decades-old artillery shells containing mustard agent. Walton Levi, site project manager of the U.S. Army Pueblo Chemical Depot, made the announcement in a depot publication on...

US, Russia still at odds over new nuclear arms treaty

Aug. 18, 2020 12:35 PM EDT

BERLIN (AP) — The United States and Russia concluded two days of arms control talks Tuesday with the two sides still at odds over the U.S. demand to include China in any new treaty but showing signs of a possible willingness to extend the existing New START deal, which expires next year. U.S. negotiator...

Editorial Roundup: US

Aug. 12, 2020 3:29 PM EDT

Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad: ___ Aug. 11 The Los Angles Times on TikTok and WeChat: Even before President Trump signed an executive order that could soon smother social network TikTok, Microsoft emerged as a potential savior for the U.S.-based but Chinese-owned video snacking...

A man and his daughter pray for the victims of U.S. atomic bombing at the Atomic Bomb Hypocenter Park in Nagasaki, southern Japan, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. Nagasaki marked the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing on Sunday. (Takuto Kaneko/Kyodo News via AP)

Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

Aug. 9, 2020 1:40 AM EDT

TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese city of Nagasaki on Sunday marked its 75th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing, with the mayor and dwindling survivors urging world leaders including their own to do more for a nuclear weapons ban. At 11:02 a.m., the moment the B-29 bomber Bockscar dropped a 4.5-ton...

Visitors observe a minute of silence for the victims of the atomic bombing, at 8:15am, the time atomic bomb exploded over the city, at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

Survivors mark 75th anniversary of world’s 1st atomic attack

Aug. 6, 2020 8:32 AM EDT

HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Survivors of the world’s first atomic bombing gathered in diminished numbers near an iconic, blasted dome Thursday to mark the attack’s 75th anniversary, many of them urging the world, and their own government, to do more to ban nuclear weapons. An upsurge of...

Lee Jong-keun speaks his experience of atomic bombing during an interview with The Associated Press in Hiroshima, western Japan Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. For nearly 70 years, until he turned 85, Lee hid his past as an atomic bomb survivor, fearful of the widespread discrimination against blast victims that has long persisted in Japan. But Lee, 92, is now part of a fast-dwindling group of survivors, known as hibakusha, that feels a growing urgency - desperation even - to tell their stories. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

Urgency to bear witness grows for last Hiroshima victims

Aug. 4, 2020 4:21 AM EDT

HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — For nearly 70 years, until he turned 85, Lee Jong-keun hid his past as an atomic bomb survivor, fearful of the widespread discrimination against blast victims that has long persisted in Japan. But Lee, 92, is now part of a fast-dwindling group of survivors, known as hibakusha, that...