Latest Domestic spying News

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2019 file photo, Colombia's army commander, Gen. Nicacio Martinez, from left, new Defense Minister Carlos Holmes Trujillo, President Ivan Duque and Armed Forces Commander Gen. Luis Fernando Navarro, review troops during a military ceremony in Bogota, Colombia. In an article published last Sunday, Semana magazine interviewed members of an elite military intelligence unit who say their superiors ordered them to use software and equipment purchased for spying on terrorist groups, to eavesdrop on high-ranking members of the opposition and on a judge who was overseeing a witness tampering case involving former president Alvaro Uribe. The magazine claims that knowledge of the espionage scandal within some sectors of the government forced the commander of Colombia's army General Nicacio Martinez to resign. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, File)

Colombian senators seek protection after surveillance report

Jan. 19, 2020 12:16 PM EST

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombian Sen. Antonio Sanguino moves around town in a bullet-proof vehicle, with three pistol-packing bodyguards watching over him as he attends meetings and political rallies. But the leftist senator says that while the bodyguards protect him from assassination attempts, they have...

FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2019, file photo, FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Washington. The FBI said Friday it was taking steps to improve the accuracy and completeness of its wiretap applications for national security investigations and to provide better training for agents. The changes were described in a 30-page filing with the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

FBI tightening up wiretap protocols after watchdog report

Jan. 10, 2020 8:58 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI laid out new protocols Friday for how it conducts electronic surveillance in national security cases, responding to a Justice Department inspector general report that harshly criticized the bureau's handling of the Russia investigation. The changes, detailed in a 30-page filing...

Ex-officer accused of shoving prisoner faces federal charge

Jan. 3, 2020 8:43 AM EST

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A fired suburban St. Louis police officer who is accused of shoving and choking a prisoner inside a booking area while a surveillance camera was rolling has been charged with a federal civil rights offense. Robert Ryan Watson, who was a Pevely police corporal, already was facing a...

FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2013 file photo, a worker looks at his mobile phone at the newly opened Al Maktoum International Airport in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. According to a New York Times report, ToTok, a chat app that quickly became popular in the United Arab Emirates for communicating with friends and family, is actually a spying tool used by the government to track its users. (Patrick Castillo/Emarat Al Youm via AP, File)

Report: Popular UAE chat app ToTok a government spy tool

Dec. 23, 2019 1:08 PM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — A chat app that quickly became popular in the United Arab Emirates for communicating with friends and family is actually a spying tool used by the government to track its users, according to a newspaper report. The government uses ToTok to track conversations, locations, images and other...

Estate of prominent federal judge leaves $100,000 to school

Dec. 18, 2019 5:36 PM EST

INSTITUTE, W.Va. (AP) — The estate of prominent Judge Damon J. Keith, who was the grandson of slaves and a figure in the civil rights movement, made a $100,000 bequest to a scholarship fund in his name, West Virginia State University announced Wednesday. Keith, who was sued by President Richard Nixon over...

FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019, in Washington. Wray says the problems found by the Justice Department watchdog examining the origins of the Russia probe are “unacceptable.

Secretive FISA court rebukes FBI over errors in Russia probe

Dec. 17, 2019 8:35 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chief judge of a secretive surveillance court said Tuesday that the FBI provided “unsupported" information when it applied to eavesdrop on a former Trump campaign adviser and directed the bureau to report back by next month on what steps it was taking to fix the problems. The...

Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz, left, speaks with Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., center, and Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., right, after testifying at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Inspector General's report on alleged abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Russia probe report spurs calls for FBI surveillance changes

Dec. 13, 2019 12:22 AM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — Revelations that the FBI committed serious errors in wiretapping a former Trump campaign aide have spurred bipartisan calls for change to the government’s surveillance powers, including from some Republicans who in the past have voted to renew or expand those authorities. Anger...

President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable on school choice in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

DOJ watchdog report takeaways: Nuance, no total absolution

Dec. 10, 2019 7:16 AM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog released a report that found the FBI had a legitimate reason to open up one of the most politically sensitive investigations ever, the Russia probe that began in secret during Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign that eventually was taken...