Latest Environmental science News

FILE - This June 1, 2019, file photo provided by the Center for Biological Diversity, shows the rare desert wildflower Tiehm's buckwheat in the Silver Peak Range about 120 miles southeast of Reno, Nev. An Australian mining company says its pursuit of a huge lithium deposit in Nevada is critical to accelerating the manufacture of electric vehicles and reducing greenhouse gases. Opponents argue the mine can't be built without causing the extinction of the only native population of the rare desert wildflower known to exist in the world. (Patrick Donnelly/Center for Biological Diversity via AP, File)

Who's greener? Mine fight pits electric cars against flower

Mar. 7, 2020 12:27 PM EST

RENO, Nev. (AP) — The rare Tiehm's buckwheat stands less than a foot tall (30 centimeters) in Nevada's rocky high desert, its thin, leafless stems adorned with tiny yellow flowers in spring. To the Australian company that wants to mine lithium beneath the federal land where it grows, the perennial herb is...

FILE - This satellite image provided by NASA on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2020 shows wildfires in Victoria and New South Wales, Australia. Climate change raised the chances of Australia’s extreme fire season by at least 30%, according to a study released Wednesday, March 4, 2020, by climate scientists at the World Weather Attribution group. (NASA via AP)

Hotter climate upped risk of Australia's record fires by 30%

Mar. 4, 2020 12:31 PM EST

WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate change raised the chances of Australia’s extreme fire season by at least 30%, according to a study released Wednesday by climate scientists at the World Weather Attribution group. Scientists from Australia, Europe and North America calculated just how much human-caused...

FILE - In this April 30, 2015 file photo, a man fishes along the receding banks of the Salton Sea near Bombay Beach, Calif. Scientists say that half of the world's sandy beached are at risk of disappearing by the end of the century if climate changes continues unchecked. Researchers at the European Union's Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy, used satellite images to track the way beaches changed over the past 30 years and project how global warming might affect them in the future. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

Half of world's sandy beaches at risk from climate change

Mar. 2, 2020 2:49 PM EST

BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say that half of the world's sandy beaches could disappear by the end of the century if climate change continues unchecked. Researchers at the European Union's Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy, used satellite images to track the way beaches have changed over the past 30 years...

FILE - In this April 11, 2018 file photo, water moves through a spillway of the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River near Almota, Wash. Farmers, environmentalists, tribal leaders and public utility officials are eagerly awaiting a federal report due Friday, Feb. 28, 2020, that could decide the fate of four hydroelectric dams on the Snake River. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios,File)

Feds reject removal of 4 US Northwest dams in key report

Feb. 28, 2020 7:50 PM EST

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A long-awaited federal report out Friday rejected the idea of removing four hydroelectric dams on a major Pacific Northwest river in a last-ditch effort tosave threatened and endangered salmon, saying such a dramatic approach would destabilize the power grid, increase overall...

Students to study economic impact of Fall River Vietnam wall

Feb. 15, 2020 2:44 PM EST

FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — A group of college students has launched a project to study the potential economic impact of the soon-to-open Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Fall River. Joseph Marshall, committee chairman of the group raising the wall, tells The Herald News the students from Salve Regina...

Ecologists hail freezing of funds for new Polish coal plant

Feb. 14, 2020 10:41 AM EST

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A European group fighting climate change on Friday hailed the decision by two Polish energy companies to suspend financing for the construction of a new coal power plant. Climate Action network said suspension of funding for the Ostroleka C plant in eastern Poland should lead to the...

In this photo taken Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, residents stand by the side of the road after fetching water, between Melut and Paloch town, in South Sudan. The oil industry in South Sudan has left a landscape pocked with hundreds of open waste pits with the water and soil contaminated with toxic chemicals and heavy metals, and accounts of

South Sudan ignores reports on oil pollution, birth defects

Feb. 14, 2020 3:10 AM EST

PALOCH, South Sudan (AP) — The oil industry in South Sudan has left a landscape pocked with hundreds of open waste pits, the water and soil contaminated with toxic chemicals and heavy metals including mercury, manganese, and arsenic, according to four environmental reports obtained by The Associated Press....

In this June 17, 2011, photo provided by NOAA Fisheries are freshwater seals at Iliamna Lake, in Alaska. An environmental group is petitioning the federal government to list a population of freshwater Alaska seals under the Endangered Species Act. The Center for Biological Diversity on Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, petitioned to provide protections to harbor seals that live at Iliamna Lake in southwest Alaska. (Dave Withrow/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

Group seeks endangered species listing for Alaska lake seals

Feb. 6, 2020 7:42 PM EST

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The only known freshwater harbor seals in the U.S. should be listed as threatened or endangered, an environmental group said Thursday in its second petition for the animals. The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned for additional protections for the 400 harbor seals that...

Manufacturer to stop making pesticide linked to brain damage

Feb. 6, 2020 7:04 PM EST

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The manufacturer of a commonly used pesticide that has been linked to brain damage in children will stop making the chemical this year. Corteva Inc. said Thursday that it will end production of chlorpyrifos by the end of this year. It cited shrinking demand and withering sales for...

In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Photos of 'king tides' globally show risks of climate change

Feb. 5, 2020 1:02 PM EST

DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities around...