Latest Higher education News

Cambridge University ending fossil fuel investments

Oct. 1, 2020 7:24 AM EDT

LONDON (AP) — The University of Cambridge said Thursday that it will kick all fossil fuel investments out of its portfolio within the next decade as part of a plan to end the emissions of greenhouse gases it's responsible for by 2038. The centuries-old English institution is joining a growing list of...

A group of five people have lunch together at the Newton Food Center Friday, June 19, 2020, in Singapore. Singaporeans can now wine and dine at restaurants, work out at gyms and get together with five people or less after most lockdown restrictions were lifted Friday. (AP Photo/YK Chan)

The Latest: US extends ban on cruise ships through October

Sep. 30, 2020 11:58 PM EDT

WASHINGTON — Federal health officials are extending the U.S. ban on cruise ships through the end of October amid reports of recent outbreaks of the new coronavirus on ships overseas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday that it was extending a no-sail order on cruise ships...

In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, traders, foreground center,  gather at a post on the NYSE trading floor during the direct listing of Palantir Technologies, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020. Shares of data-mining company Palantir jumped 47% to $10.67 on their first day of trading. The company was born 17 years ago with the help of CIA seed money. Palantir isn't selling new shares to raise money. Instead, it's listing existing shares for public trading. (NYSE Photo/Courtney Crow via AP)

Secretive, never profitable Palantir makes market debut

Sep. 30, 2020 5:06 PM EDT

BOSTON (AP) — Seventeen years after it was born with the help of CIA seed money, the data-mining outfit Palantir Technologies is finally going public in the biggest Wall Street tech offering since last year's debut of Slack and Uber. Never profitable and dogged by ethical objections for assisting in the...

Engineering graduates of the Universite Libre De Bruxelles, cheer after a graduation ceremony at the Grand Place in Brussels, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020. Many of these students were supposed to graduate in June, but with exams cancelled and COVID-19 regulations in place many students were unable to manage that in time. Pandemic restrictions limited the guest invitations to only 2 persons for each graduate. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

In virus boon, Belgian students graduate at UNESCO site

Sep. 30, 2020 11:31 AM EDT

BRUSSELS (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has put a massive damper on student life across the globe. But in Brussels it has one boon: graduation at a UNESCO Word Heritage location. The Belgian capital has made its world-famous Grand-Place square available as an open-air location for nearly 4,000 students...

FILE - In this July 19, 2018, file photo, civil rights movement activist James Meredith, right, greets a friend with a black power salute as he takes a coffee break at a north Jackson, Miss., grocery store.

James Meredith film weighs 'complicated' civil rights figure

Sep. 30, 2020 7:34 AM EDT

RIO RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — A new documentary is diving into the complicated, and sometimes contradictory life of James Meredith, a Black civil rights figure who helped change Mississippi. “Walk Against Fear: James Meredith,” scheduled to air Thursday on the Smithsonian Channel, examines the...

In this photo provided by Charlie Vallejo, Dr. Carlos Vallejo, right, celebrates Dr. Jorge Vallejo's birthday on June 12, 2020, at a Cuban restaurant in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Dr. Jorge Vallejo was hospitalized the night before Father's Day due to COVID-19. His son, the internist Dr. Carlos Vallejo, who was treating elderly residents infected with the coronavirus, was taken to another hospital hours later with shortness of breath due to the virus. They both died at ages 89 and 57, respectively. Dr. Jorge Vallejo, his wife and two sons arrived from Cuba in 1965 in an old navy torpedo boat. (Charlie Vallejo via AP)

Lives Lost: Father, son doctors started as Cuban refugees

Sep. 30, 2020 12:02 AM EDT

MIAMI (AP) — Almost fifty-five years ago, Dr. Jorge Vallejo told his colleagues at a Havana hospital that he needed to rush home to check on one of his toddler sons who had a fever. That was a lie. He actually went home to pack some clothes before he, his wife and two boys boarded a torpedo boat named...

In this Sunday, Oct. 22, 2017 photo, Kwanza Hall  answers a question during the Atlanta Police Foundation's Atlanta Mayoral debate hosted by WSB-TV at their studios in Atlanta.. Crime and safety were the main topic of discussion during live debate. (Phil Skinner/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

Hall, Franklin head to runoff for rest of John Lewis’ term

Sep. 29, 2020 10:23 PM EDT

ATLANTA (AP) — Former Atlanta City Councilman Kwanza Hall and former Morehouse College President Robert Franklin advanced to a runoff in Tuesday’s special election to fill the short remainder of the late John Lewis’ term in Congress. Hall and Franklin led five other candidates in...

Michelle Winings, R.N., prepares to give Gov. Roy Cooper his flu shot at the Wake County Health Department in Raleigh, N.C., Friday, Sept. 25, 2020. (Ethan Hyman/The News & Observer via AP)

The Latest: UN chief cites pandemic's 'unprecedent toll'

Sep. 29, 2020 9:48 PM EDT

UNITED NATIONS -- The United Nations chief says the COVID-19 pandemic has taken “an unprecedent toll” especially on the economies of many developing countries and the world has not responded with “the massive and urgent support those countries and communities need.” Secretary-General...

Homeless man accused of smearing blood on sorority house

Sep. 29, 2020 6:22 PM EDT

GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A homeless man has been charged for smearing satanic messages in blood on a sorority house and on a vehicle belonging to a student living there, police in North Carolina said Tuesday. Patrick Canter, 25, was charged with injury to real property, WITN reported, citing East Carolina...

Appalachian League leads off in minor league contraction

Sep. 29, 2020 6:22 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — Major League Baseball started the process of eliminating minor league affiliates Tuesday, with the Appalachian League converted to a college summer circuit for rising freshmen and sophomores. The agreement between MLB and the minor leagues expires Wednesday. MLB has proposed cutting the...