Latest Workers' rights News

FILE - This Nov. 4, 2019, file photo shows cargo cranes at the Port of Tacoma in Tacoma, Wash. U.S lawmakers are pushing for a ban on exports from an area of northwest China following a report that found widespread use of forced labor. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Congress seeks to block goods from China over forced labor

Sep. 22, 2020 5:23 PM EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan bill aimed at keeping goods out of the U.S. that are made with the forced labor of detained ethnic minorities in China passed overwhelmingly Tuesday in the House of Representatives despite concerns about the potential effects on global commerce. The House voted 406-3 to...

FILE - In this July 20, 2020, file photo, Audrey Reed, 8, holds up a sing through the sunroof of a car during a rally in Los Angeles. Ahead of Labor Day, major U.S. labor unions say they are considering work stoppages in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

Unions threaten work stoppages amid calls for racial justice

Sep. 5, 2020 1:31 PM EDT

NEW YORK (AP) — Ahead of Labor Day, unions representing millions across several working-class sectors are threatening to authorize work stoppages in support of the Black Lives Matter movement amid calls for concrete measures that address racial injustice. In a statement first shared with The Associated...

FILE - In this Dec. 20, 2019 file photo, construction is underway at the Lusail Stadium, one of the 2022 World Cup stadiums, in Lusail, Qatar. A U.N. labor body says new labor rules in the energy-rich nation of Qatar “effectively dismantles” the country’s long-criticized “kafala” employment system. The International Labor Organization said Sunday, Aug. 30, 2020, that as of now, migrant workers can change jobs before the end of their contracts without obtaining the permission of their current employers. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)

UN labor body: Qatar 'dismantles' kafala employment system

Aug. 30, 2020 8:44 PM EDT

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — New labor rules in the energy-rich nation of Qatar “effectively dismantles” the country's long-criticized “kafala” employment system, a U.N. labor body said Sunday. The International Labor Organization said as of now, migrant workers can...

FILE - President Donald Trump points to a question as he speaks during a briefing with reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, in Washington.  TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take the Trump administration to court over a sweeping order that could ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits. The employees’ legal challenge to Trump’s executive order will be separate from a pending lawsuit from the company that owns the app, says Mike Godwin, an internet policy lawyer representing the employees. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

TikTok and its employees prepare to fight Trump over app ban

Aug. 13, 2020 7:52 PM EDT

TikTok and its U.S. employees are planning to take President Donald Trump's administration to court over his sweeping order to ban the popular video app, according to a lawyer preparing one of the lawsuits. The employees' legal challenge to Trump's executive order will be separate from a pending lawsuit from the...